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Day 1 :

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fanjun Meng  photo
Biography:

Fanjun Meng has his expertise in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The Modified Subcutaneous Buried Horizontal Mattress Suture he proposed in the paper is a new technique to close the tensioned wound. In vitro study and clinic practice, it is proved to be an efficient technique to reduce the tension of the wound and to prevent scarring postoperation of the large skin lesion excision.

 

Abstract:

Background: Wound tension reduction is still a challenge to surgeons. Over the years, many techniqueshave been proposed to avoid this issue. In this paper, we present a new suture technique.

Objectives: To investigate the tension-reduction effectiveness of the modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture compared with the vertical buried mattress suture technique.

Methods: Two suture techniques, the vertical buried mattress suture (group A) and the modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture (group B), were performed on paired samples of symmetrical skin flaps. An equal pulling force was applied to each paired sutured flap, and the dehiscences of the samples in the two groups were compared. Then, after the periodic mechanical pulling force was recorded, the dehiscences were compared again.

Results: The dehiscences of the vertical buried mattress suture samples(group A) were much wider than their corresponding samples. Modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture samples (group B) remained well closed with no or minimal dehiscence, under various

Background: Wound tension reduction is still a challenge to surgeons. Over the years, many techniqueshave been proposed to avoid this issue. In this paper, we present a new suture technique.

Objectives: To investigate the tension-reduction effectiveness of the modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture compared with the vertical buried mattress suture technique.

Methods: Two suture techniques, the vertical buried mattress suture (group A) and the modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture (group B), were performed on paired samples of symmetrical skin flaps. An equal pulling force was applied to each paired sutured flap, and the dehiscences of the samples in the two groups were compared. Then, after the periodic mechanical pulling force was recorded, the dehiscences were compared again.

Results: The dehiscences of the vertical buried mattress suture samples(group A) were much wider than their corresponding samples. Modified subcutaneous buried horizontal mattress suture samples (group B) remained well closed with no or minimal dehiscence, under various

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Trisha Dunning Am  photo
Biography:

Professor Dunning is the inaugural Chair in Nursing and a member of the Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Barwon Health Deakin University Partnership. Her research and care focus in on older people with diabetes and diabetes and end of life care. She is widely published in these areas. She serves on many professional committees and advisory boards, including Diabetes Victoria, College of Nursing Australia and the International Diabetes Federation She was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2004 for her work in nursing and diabetes.


 

Abstract:

Diabetes is an underlying cause of death in over 60% of deaths due to diabetes complications and other comorbidities. People with diabetes have a shorter life expectancy than the population. Quality diabetes palliative and end of life care requires a personalized approach and should be a proactive collaborative endeavor. Clinicians are reluctant to discuss these issues with people with diabetes and there is limited guidance to support their decision-making.

Keynote Forum

Tazeen Jamal Siddiqui

Mansha Educational Society, India

Keynote: Mind and Heart aligned to Nonagon Leadership skills
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tazeen Jamal Siddiqui photo
Biography:

Abstract:

This Paper intends to explain that Leadership is a strong word by its pronunciation and its essence  of existence in every heart and mind encourages to transform themselves and others at each step of life.

Introduction: Every human is a born leader,but few make it to the strength of its word as among all the eople only  few realize their true strengths to lead themselves and others to the journey of excellence with the true guidance of vision and perseverance to their strength to rise each day to create a better version of themselves. Leadership is not about a good leader or a bad leader its about understanding the functioning of the system of heart and mind aligned to take a decision of excellence with love, care and kindness with firm perseverance to positive outcomes.
 
Conclusion: The nine pillars of leadership called Nonagon Leadership Helps every heart and mind to lead in an effective way with great courage and happiness of creating leaders to be true leaders.

Keynote Forum

Stef Stienstra

Armed forces of the Netherlands, Netherlands

Keynote: The threat of zoonotic diseases and Ebola virus disease specifically
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stef Stienstra photo
Biography:

Stef Stienstra works internationally for several Medical and Biotech companies as Scientific Advisory Board Member and is also an Active Reserve-Officer of the Royal Dutch Navy in his rank as Commander (OF4). For the Dutch Armed Forces. He is CBRNe specialist with focus on Microbiological and Chemical threats and Medical- and Environmental functional specialist within the 1st CMI (Civil Military Interaction) Battalion of the Dutch Armed Forces. For Expertise France he is now managing an EU CBRN CoE public health project in west Africa. In his civilian position, he is at this moment developing with MT-Derm in Berlin (Germany), a novel interdermal vaccination technology as well as a new therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis for which he has won a Canadian ‘Grand Challenge’ grant. With Hemanua in Dublin (Ireland), he has developed an innovative blood separation unit, which is also suitable to produce convalescent plasma for Ebola virus disese therapy. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry in The Netherlands with a Doctorate and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-haematology, infectous diseaases, biodefense and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence helps to initiate new successful businesses, often generated from unexpected combinations of technologies.

 

Abstract:

Public health systems are not always prepared for outbreaks of infectious diseases. Although in the past several public health institutes, like the French ‘Institute Pasteur’ and the Dutch ‘Tropeninstitute, were prominent surveyors of infectious diseases, the investments in worldwide public health have decreased. Now more attention is given to curative healthcare compared to preventive healthcare. The recent Ebola virus disease outbreak in west Africa initiated a new wave of interest to invest in Worldwide Public Health to prevent outbreaks of highly contagious diseases. Zoonotic diseases are threatening as the population does not have natural nor artificial (from vaccination) immune response to new diseases like in the Ebola virus disease outbreak in 2014. The new strain of the Ebola virus in west Africa was slightly less lethal, compared to other Ebola virus strains, but the threat of spreading was far bigger as it had a longer incubation time. Most public health systems are not trained well enough to mitigate highly infectious and deadly disease outbreaks. NGO’s helping to fight the outbreak are often better trained in curative treatments and have less experience with biological (bioweapon) threats for which the military are trained for. The UNMEER mission was unique in this. It was a setting in which military and civilian actors cooperate in fighting a biological threat. Protection is essential for health workers. Smart systems should be developed to prevent further spreading of the disease, but it is not only the biosafety, which should be considered, but also the biosecurity, as misuse of extremely dangerous strains of microorganisms cannot be excluded. Several zoonotic infectious diseases, like anthrax, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers are listed as potential bioweapons. Therefor both biosafety and biosecurity should be implemented in all measures to fight outbreaks of highly infectious diseases.

Keynote Forum

Limin Chen

University of Toronto,Canada and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, China

Keynote: Activation of the ubiquitin-like ISG15/USP18 signaling pathway contributes to interferon resistance of HCV and HBV
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Limin Chen photo
Biography:

Dr. Limin Chen, affiliate scientist with the University of Torontoa and also a professor with the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), now is the director and chief scientific officer of the center for transfusion transmitted diseases, Institute of Blood Transfusion (IBT), CAMS/PUMC, Member of the American Association for Studies of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and Canadian Association for Studies of Liver (CASL). He obtained his MD, MSc in biochemistry and molecular biology in China, PhD in molecular genetics at the University of Toronto. Dr. Chen obtained his postdoctoral training both at the Merck Research Laboratories and at the Harvard Medical School . Currently Dr. Chen’s research focuses on the virus-host interaction of the hepatitis viruses, especially HCV and HBV.  He pioneered the work on identification of the response signature of HCV non-response to interferon treatment and proposed a novel mechanism on how HCV exploits host innate immune response to benefit its persistent infection and resistance to interferon-based therapy.

 

Abstract:

Activation of the type-I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway poses the first line of defense against many virus infections, including HCV and HBV. Our previous work identified, using high throughput gene expression profiling,  18 differentially-expressed hepatic genes between treatment responders (Rs) and non-responders (NRs) to IFN treatment of patients chronically infected with HCV. 3 out of these 18 genes are involved in the same ubiquitin-like ISG15/USP18 signaling pathway, with higher expression levels in the pre-treatment liver tissues of NRs, indicating that activation of the ISG15/USP18 signaling contributes to treatment non-response leading to persistent infection. Similar findings were observed in chronic HBV infection. Mechanistically, some of these ISGs, such as ISG15 and ISG16 stimulated HCV replication and blunted IFN anti-HCV activity. All these data point out that type-I IFN signaling is a “double-edged” sword: while activation of this pathway is indeed necessary to control viral spread, over-activation of this pathway leading to the activation of the ISG15/USP18signaling  actually benefits virus to facilitate its persistent infection.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cheng-Cheng Tung photo
Biography:

Cheng-Cheng Tung is currently working as a General Surgeon in Yuan Rung Hospital, Taiwan. He has completed his medical degree in Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine. Earlier, he had worked as Trauma and General Surgeon at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Further, he did his Fellowship at University of Maryland Medical Center and R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. He has done his PhD in Asia University College of Medical and Health Science. His research interest is general surgery, endoscopic surgery and acute care surgery.

Abstract:

Background & Purpose: Pelvic fracture bleeding generally destines hemorrhagic shock. Trans-arterial-embolization (TAE) is
regarded as the most useful treatment. However, there are still some initial presentations of the patient impacting the effectiveness of TAE in pelvic fracture bleeding. This retrospective study is to explore profitability of available initial presentations for TAE in pelvic fracture bleeding.
Method: There were 27 charts reviewed retrospectively. The definition of TAE failure was that the patient eventually received
an exigent laparotomy due to uncontrolled bleeding after TAE or that the patient was defunct. We analyzed available initial presentations like age, gender, systolic-blood-pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, Glasgow-coma-scale (GCS), injury-severity-score (ISS) and associated-injuries through Pearson’s correlation and independent t-test when the patient received therapeutic TAE. Odds-ratio preceded the cut-off point disclosed through an independent t-test for successful TAE and used to assess the congruity.
Result: Successful TAE didn’t associate with age and gender. Hierarchical statistically significant associations between successful TAE and initial presentations were the patient’s body temperature, associated injury, respiratory rate, systolic-blood-pressure, GCS and ISS. Odds-ratios for all statistically significant initial presentations were within a 95% confidence interval.
Conclusion: Profitability of available initial presentations for TAE is hypothermia prevention with upholding a body temperature of more than 36 °C, determining associated injuries within two organ-systems, keeping the respiratory rate around 22 per minute, sustaining systolic-blood-pressure around 90 mmHg, maintaining a heart-rate of around 100 per-minute as well as the permissiveness of a minor head injury with the GCS more than 13 and a moderate ISS of less than 20.

Keynote Forum

Paul H Hughes

University of NSW, Australia

Keynote: Diagnosis and Management trends of Dry Eye Disease in 2020
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul H Hughes photo
Biography:

Paul H Hughes is a renowned refractive surgeon in Australia gaining his BSc and MBBS from the University of NSW in Sydney, Australia. He introduced the early refractive procedures into Australia and was one of the first ophthalmologists to have his own private refractive suites, an ophthalmic centre of excellence (Southline eye centre).

He has made the journey from Refractive Keratectomy (RK) through Automated Lamellar Keratoplasy (ALK) to Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) then to laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with the excimer laser and is now using the femtosecond laser (Visumax) to perform 3rd generation refractive surgery Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE). Hughes has published many peer reviewed papers and spoken regularly at international ophthalmic meetings over the years. As a refractive surgeon he is very aware of the importance of Ocular Surface Disease (OSD) and its effect on excellent surgical outcomes.

Abstract:

Ocular surface disease is a common and often chronic condition that can have a lasting negative effect on quality of life and visual outcomes. The condition is extremely prevalent and environmental and lifestyle factors are partially responsible.

It is grossly under diagnosed and is exacerbated by surgical procedures and it affects refractivediagnostic techniques with poor keratometry affecting IOL calculations.

The literature describes several definitions, classifications and treatment methods and will be discussed in the paper.

The cause, differential diagnosis, masquerade syndrome and the various approaches to take in the treatment of OSD will be highlighted.Classification of dry eye disease will be discussed in detail compared to normal tear film physiology. The role of Meibomian gland dysfunction in the disease will be discussed.

Ocular surface disease data from the ESCRS 2018 Clinical Trends Survey Results will be mentioned.

OSD is a complex disease where treatment is dependent on the cause. There is no quick fixand it is essential to work together with the patient in developing a treatment plan to optimize the ocular surface prior to surgical procedures especially refractive.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ibrahim Saleh Alharbi photo
Biography:

Ibrahim Saleh Alharbi is currently working as an Internal Medicine Resident-R4 at the hospital of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Introduction: Diabetes is an established risk factor for coronary artery disease. In addition, hyperglycemia has been shown to be associated with increased markers of vascular inflammation and myocardial perfusion defect on contrast echocardiography. However, data regarding the effect of blood glucose level (BS) on myocardial blood flow (MBF) on Positron emission tomography (PET) is limited. We sought to examine the effect of BS and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) on MBF and coronary artery reserve (CFR) measured by vasodilator PET.
 
Methods: All hospitalized consecutive patients referred to clinically indicated PET between May 2011 and December 2017 who had fasting blood glucose in the day of the test and HbA1C within three months of the test were included in the analysis. Patients with known CAD, ischemia (sum difference score > 2), scar (sum stress score >3), transient ischemic dilatation and abnormal resting left ventricular function were excluded. MBF was measured by single compartment method and CFR is calculated as stress MBF/rest MBF.
 
Results: A total of 184 patients (mean age 60 ± 10, 50% female) were included. 68 patients had HbA1C above 7 mg/dl. Patients with elevated HbA1C were older and have higher prevalence of cardiac risk factors (p<0.001). Using spearman correlation, there was a weak, but statistically significant correlation between CFR and HbA1C (r=0.2199, p=0.0027) and fasting BS (r=0.178, p=0.0596) However, there was no correlation between peak MBF with HbA1C(r=0.0614, p=0.4079) or fasting blood sugar (r=0.0863 p=0.3589). Using multivariate linear regression, the correlation between HbA1C and CFR was significant after adjusting for confounders (Beta=0.366, p=0.022)
 
Conclusions: Coronary artery circulation is affected by the glucose status in the blood. Whether BS should be corrected for to improve the accuracy of CFR by PET is yet to be determined.

Keynote Forum

Guy Hugues Fontaine

Université Pierre et Marie Curie, France

Keynote: Mechanism of Torsades de Pointes elucidated in human AV block
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Guy Hugues Fontaine photo
Biography:

Guy Fontaine has made 15 original contributions at the inception of cardiac pacemakers in the mid-60s. He has published more than 900 scientific papers including 201 book chapters. He is included in the Profiles in Cardiology (W Hurst 2003) book of the 216 individuals who have made a significant contribution to the study of cardiovascular diseases since the 14th century. He has been included in the book “500 greatest Geniuses of the 21st century” of the American Biographical Institute (ABI 2005). He was the reviewer of 17 journals both in clinical and basic Science. He served during 5 years as a Member of the Editorial Board of Circulation. He has been invited to give 11 master lectures of 90 minutes each during three weeks in the top universities of China (2014).

Abstract:

Two successive mechanisms may explain Torsades de Pointes (TdP) in patients with complete AV block. (1) A phase 2 reentrant phenomena in adjacent side-to-side myocardial fibers based on dispersion of action potential duration to explain the first TdP beat (2) this phenomenon is followed by a fast circus movement reentry in agreement with the “leading circle” concept with a speed only limited by the ventricular refractory period. The initiation of multiple “rotors” may result in VF because long episodes may lead to myocardial ischemia (Fig.1). However, intraventricular myocardial conduction blocks may explain that most TdPs stop spontaneously. Because this phenomenon needs a thin myocardial structure as demonstrated by optical mapping we suspect that its origin is located in the “crista supraventricularis”. Two exit sites of the circus movement can take place along the antero-superior and postero-inferior sulcia explaining the opposite orientation of the initial vectors observed at the beginning of most of the torsades. This is followed by a Wenkebach phenomenon on at least one of these two pathways. This may explain the feature of the twisting of the QRS tips around the isoelectric line. This theory is comforted by the abrupt change in the direction of activation suggesting a Mobitz type 2 block occurring on one of these two preferential pathways. The same mechanism can be observed on a reentrant loop around an anatomical obstacle producing a TdP-like arrhythmia in case of two exit sites of opposite directions

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dehua(David) Zheng  photo
Biography:

Dehua Zheng has completed his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering from North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China in 1982 and 1987, respectively. He has also graduated another M.Sc. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Manitoba, Canada in 1995. His profesional experience includes the Manitoba Hydropower Company, University of Manitoba MB Canada (he involved in the PSCAD & RTDS development teams), Saskachewan Polytech Institute SK Canada, China Goldwind Science and Technology Co., Ltd., and others. Dehua Zheng is currently a Deputy Director of China Smart Distribution System & Decentralized Generation Committee, Deputy Director of China National Wind Power Engineering Technology Research Center, Chief Scientist of Goldwind Science and Technology Co., Ltd., IEC project leader for IEC/TS 62898-3-1: Microgrids – Technical Requirements – Protection and Dynamic Control, IEEE Senior Member, and registered senior electrical engineer, PhD. professor in many universities. He is also leading the Microgrid and Energy Internet Technology and Business in China, and devotes himself to research and development of Chinese and world microgrid and energy internet technology.

Abstract:

Introduction  
Microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources (including microturbines, diesel generators, energy storage, renewable resources, and all other kinds of distributed energy resources) at distribution level with defined electrical boundaries that has black start capacity and can operate in island mode and/or grid-connected mode.       Because of the uncertainty, intermittent, and discontinuity of the renewable resources, transient disturbance and dynamic disturbance exist in the microgrid. For the fault current is small in the system and the microgrid has very little inertia, the disturbance control and fault protection of microgrids are more difficult than the ones of traditional grids.       The most challenging part of protection and dynamic control of microgrids is figuring out whether a fault or disturbance is occurring in the system. In the microgrid, there may appear transient characteristics similar to the transient and dynamic disturbance at the initial faults. If there is a fault, the transient disturbance control should be used to prevent the system from collapsing and make sure the right breakers should be tripped. But if there are transient and dynamic disturbances, even the initial characteristics of the transient and dynamic are very similar to the fault ones, the breakers should not be tripped.       So that Mr. Zheng has been leading his team to propose and develop the dynamic disturbance control, transient disturbance control and fault protection technologies, and they all have been well applied in practical projects. The main innovations are as follows:       (1) Relying on the dynamic disturbance control technology of the energy storage system, it can achieve safe and stable operation under the condition of high permeability of renewable energy, and can support 100% consumption of renewable energy generation in microgrid system.       (2) Through real-time load and power generation monitoring, analysis and control technology, relying on power and energy storage energy to effectively suppress transient disturbances and dynamic disturbances, respectively, to achieve unplanned seamless switching from grid connected mode to island mode or vice versa (time less than 10 
milliseconds), Improve the safe and stable operation level of the system.       (3) Based on the Park transformation and the fault identification technology of branch current and voltage harmonic rapid changing rate, the precise positioning and fast isolation of the fault components of the microgrid are realized.       (4) Based on the power and load side comprehensive treatment technology, the total harmonic distortion rate (THD) of voltage and current is less than 3% when operating on an island.       The microgrid dynamic disturbance control technology, transient disturbance control technology and fault protection technology have been evaluated by domestic and foreign experts as reaching the international leading level. The dynamic security issue is one of the most basic issues, which face the force framework architects. Dynamic security alludes to the capacity of the electrical force framework to keep up the synchronism when exposed to a cut off trainset unsettling influence. In this way, the dynamic security manages unsettling influences that force pivotal changes into the framework factors. Among these are short out flaws, loss of a predominant age source, and loss of a huge burden. The framework reaction to these aggravations remembers huge deviations for the framework factors, for example, voltage extents and edges, generator speed, and framework recurrence. Subsequently, the harmony between the information mechanical force and the yield electrical force is upset. And afterward, the confound makes the coordinated generators (SGs) either quicken or decelerate.  Then again, saving unique security is diverse between the mass force frameworks and MGs. On account of the mass force frameworks, the customary simultaneous generators are viewed as the wellspring of the elements. Moreover, in MGs, the RESs are the host of elements. In addition, the greater part of the accessible strategies for saving the dynamic security of the mass force frameworks are viewed as wasteful for MGs because of these techniques are conceived dependent on the highlights of the mass force framework, which are critical inactivity consistent and rather moderate elements. Subsequently, this exploration examines the dynamic security issue in the microgrids. In the MGs, the RESs trade capacity to 
   
This work is partly presented at 8th World Congress and Expo on Green Energy June 15-16, 2020 
Vol.4 No.2 Short Communication Journal of Nuclear Energy & Power Generation Technologies 2020 
the MGs through inverters/converters. The force electronic interface-based RESs are static gadgets with no turning mass so the related inactivity steady is about zero.  
Microgrid framework:  The MG is a little force framework, which comprised of Distributed Generators (DGs), local burdens, vitality stockpiling frameworks (EES), and force molding units. The MG is dispersed through low voltage appropriation frameworks and the electric force is primarily created by DGs, for example, photovoltaic (PV), wind turbines (WT), hydropower plant, power devices, and so on. This exploration centers around the islanded MG, which incorporates 20 MW of Thermal force plants, 6 MW of a breeze ranch, 4.5 MW of a sun based homestead, and 15 MW of household loads. The streamlined model of an islanded MG with impact of the proposed coordination Keywords: Smart microgrid; Microgrid protection and control technology; Renewable energy.  

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sergey Suchkov photo
Biography:

Sergey Suchkov graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and was awarded with MD.In 1985, Suchkov obtained his Ph.D. As a Ph.D. student of the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and Institute of Medical Enzymology, USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia. In 2001, Suchkov finished the PostDoc Research Fellowship Program and maintained his Doctor Degree at the National Institute of Immunology, Russia. From 1987 through 1989, Dr. Suchkov was a senior Researcher, Lab of Developmental Immunology, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, USSR Academy of Sciences to deal to developmental immunology. From 1989 through 1995, Dr. Suchkov was being a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology and Im-munobiotechnology, Helmholtz Eye Research Institute in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004, Dr. Suchkov was being a Chairman of the Department for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute (MONIKI) and the Immunologist-in-Chief of the Moscow Regional Ministry of Health. At present, Dr Sergey Suchkov, M, Ph.D., is Professor in Immunology, Department of Pathology, School for Pharmacy, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Dean of the Department (Faculty) of The PPPM Development, and the First Vice-President of the University of World Business, Politics and Law and Secretary General, United Cultural Convention (UCC), Cambridge, UK.

Abstract:

Abs against myelin basic protein/MBP endowing with proteolytic activity (Ab-proteases) are of great value to monitor demyelination to illustrate the evolution of multiple sclerosis (MS). Anti-MBPautoAbs from MS patients and mice with EAE exhibited specific proteolytic cleavage of MBP The activity of the MBP-targeted Ab-proteases markedly differs between: (i) MS patients and healthy controls; (ii) different clinical MS courses; (iii) EDSS scales of demyelination to correlate with the disability of MS patients to predict the transformation prior to changes of the clinical course.
The sequence-specificity of Ab-proteases demonstrates five sites of preferential proteolysis to be located within the immunodominant regions of MBP confirmed by the structural databanks.Two of them falling inside the sequence covering a 81-103 peptide and its 82-98 subsegment as well, with the highest encephalitogenic properties both to act as a specific inducer of EAE and to be attacked by the MBP-targeted Ab-proteases in MS patients with the most severe (progradient) clinical courses.
Sites localized within the frame of 43-68 and 146-170 peptide subsegments whilst being less immunogenic happened to be EAE inducers very rare but were shown to be attacked by Ab-proteases in MS patients with moderate (remission-type) clinical courses.
The activity of Ab-proteases was first registered at the subclinical stages 1-2 years prior to the clinical illness. About 24% of the direct MS-related relatives were seropositive for low-active Ab-proteases from which 38% of the seropositive relatives established were being monitored for 2 years whilst demonstrating a stable growth of the Ab-associated proteolytic activity. Registration in the evolution of highly immunogenic Ab-proteases to attack 81-103 and 82-98 sites pre-dominantly would illustrate either risks of transformation of subclinical stages into clinical ones, or risks of exacerbations to develop.
The activity of Ab-proteases in combination with the sequence-specificity would confirm a high subclinical and predictive (translational) value of the tools as applicable for personalized moni-toring protocols. And close association between the proteolytic sensitivity of MBP and post-translational modifications of the latter may represent one of the key regulatory mechanisms in the epitope generation.
Ab-proteases can be programmed and re-programmed to suit the needs of the body metabolism or could be designed for the development of principally new catalysts with no natural counter-parts. By changing sequence specificity of the Ab-mediated proteolysis one may reach reduction of a density of points of the negative proteolytic effects within the myelin sheath and minimizing scales of demyelination. And, autoAb-mediated proteolysis could thus be applied to isolate from Ig molecules the efficient catalytic domains directed against particular autoimmune epitopes pa-thogenically and clinically relevant (encephalitogenic epitopes).

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dehua(David) Zheng  photo
Biography:

Dehua Zheng has completed his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering from North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China in 1982 and 1987, respectively. He has also graduated another M.Sc. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Manitoba, Canada in 1995. His profesional experience includes the Manitoba Hydropower Company, University of Manitoba MB Canada (he involved in the PSCAD & RTDS development teams), Saskachewan Polytech Institute SK Canada, China Goldwind Science and Technology Co., Ltd., and others. Dehua Zheng is currently a Deputy Director of China Smart Distribution System & Decentralized Generation Committee, Deputy Director of China National Wind Power Engineering Technology Research Center, Chief Scientist of Goldwind Science and Technology Co., Ltd., IEC project leader for IEC/TS 62898-3-1: Microgrids – Technical Requirements – Protection and Dynamic Control, IEEE Senior Member, and registered senior electrical engineer, PhD. professor in many universities. He is also leading the Microgrid and Energy Internet Technology and Business in China, and devotes himself to research and development of Chinese and world microgrid and energy internet technology.

Abstract:

Introduction  
Microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources (including microturbines, diesel generators, energy storage, renewable resources, and all other kinds of distributed energy resources) at distribution level with defined electrical boundaries that has black start capacity and can operate in island mode and/or grid-connected mode.       Because of the uncertainty, intermittent, and discontinuity of the renewable resources, transient disturbance and dynamic disturbance exist in the microgrid. For the fault current is small in the system and the microgrid has very little inertia, the disturbance control and fault protection of microgrids are more difficult than the ones of traditional grids.       The most challenging part of protection and dynamic control of microgrids is figuring out whether a fault or disturbance is occurring in the system. In the microgrid, there may appear transient characteristics similar to the transient and dynamic disturbance at the initial faults. If there is a fault, the transient disturbance control should be used to prevent the system from collapsing and make sure the right breakers should be tripped. But if there are transient and dynamic disturbances, even the initial characteristics of the transient and dynamic are very similar to the fault ones, the breakers should not be tripped.       So that Mr. Zheng has been leading his team to propose and develop the dynamic disturbance control, transient disturbance control and fault protection technologies, and they all have been well applied in practical projects. The main innovations are as follows:       (1) Relying on the dynamic disturbance control technology of the energy storage system, it can achieve safe and stable operation under the condition of high permeability of renewable energy, and can support 100% consumption of renewable energy generation in microgrid system.       (2) Through real-time load and power generation monitoring, analysis and control technology, relying on power and energy storage energy to effectively suppress transient disturbances and dynamic disturbances, respectively, to achieve unplanned seamless switching from grid connected mode to island mode or vice versa (time less than 10 
milliseconds), Improve the safe and stable operation level of the system.       (3) Based on the Park transformation and the fault identification technology of branch current and voltage harmonic rapid changing rate, the precise positioning and fast isolation of the fault components of the microgrid are realized.       (4) Based on the power and load side comprehensive treatment technology, the total harmonic distortion rate (THD) of voltage and current is less than 3% when operating on an island.       The microgrid dynamic disturbance control technology, transient disturbance control technology and fault protection technology have been evaluated by domestic and foreign experts as reaching the international leading level. The dynamic security issue is one of the most basic issues, which face the force framework architects. Dynamic security alludes to the capacity of the electrical force framework to keep up the synchronism when exposed to a cut off trainset unsettling influence. In this way, the dynamic security manages unsettling influences that force pivotal changes into the framework factors. Among these are short out flaws, loss of a predominant age source, and loss of a huge burden. The framework reaction to these aggravations remembers huge deviations for the framework factors, for example, voltage extents and edges, generator speed, and framework recurrence. Subsequently, the harmony between the information mechanical force and the yield electrical force is upset. And afterward, the confound makes the coordinated generators (SGs) either quicken or decelerate.  Then again, saving unique security is diverse between the mass force frameworks and MGs. On account of the mass force frameworks, the customary simultaneous generators are viewed as the wellspring of the elements. Moreover, in MGs, the RESs are the host of elements. In addition, the greater part of the accessible strategies for saving the dynamic security of the mass force frameworks are viewed as wasteful for MGs because of these techniques are conceived dependent on the highlights of the mass force framework, which are critical inactivity consistent and rather moderate elements. Subsequently, this exploration examines the dynamic security issue in the microgrids. In the MGs, the RESs trade capacity to 
   
This work is partly presented at 8th World Congress and Expo on Green Energy June 15-16, 2020 
Vol.4 No.2 Short Communication Journal of Nuclear Energy & Power Generation Technologies 2020 
the MGs through inverters/converters. The force electronic interface-based RESs are static gadgets with no turning mass so the related inactivity steady is about zero.  
Microgrid framework:  The MG is a little force framework, which comprised of Distributed Generators (DGs), local burdens, vitality stockpiling frameworks (EES), and force molding units. The MG is dispersed through low voltage appropriation frameworks and the electric force is primarily created by DGs, for example, photovoltaic (PV), wind turbines (WT), hydropower plant, power devices, and so on. This exploration centers around the islanded MG, which incorporates 20 MW of Thermal force plants, 6 MW of a breeze ranch, 4.5 MW of a sun based homestead, and 15 MW of household loads. The streamlined model of an islanded MG with impact of the proposed coordination Keywords: Smart microgrid; Microgrid protection and control technology; Renewable energy.  

Keynote Forum

Wai Kwong TANG

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Keynote: Structural and functional MRI correlates of Poststroke Depression
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wai Kwong TANG photo
Biography:

Professor WK Tang was appointed to professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2011. His main research areas are Addictions and Neuropsychiatry in Stroke. Professor Tang has published over 100 papers in renowned journals, and has also contributed to the peer review of 40 journals. He has secured over 20 major competitive research grants, including Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 02130726. Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 01120376. National Natural Science Foundation of China, reference number: 81371460. General Research Fund, reference number: 474513. General Research Fund, reference number: 473712. He has served the editorial boards of five scientific journals. He was also a recipient of the Young Researcher Award in 2007, awarded by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Abstract:

Depression is common following an acute stroke. Poststroke Depression (PSD) have notable impacts on the function recovery and quality of life of stroke survivors. Incidence decreased across time after stroke, but prevalence of PSD tend to be stable. Many studies have explored the association between lesion location and the incidence of PSD. For example, lesions in frontal lobe, basal ganglia and deep white matter have been related with PSD. Furthermore, cerebral microbleeds and functional changes in brain networks have also been implicated in the development of PSD. In this presentation, evidences of such association between the above structural and functional brain changes and PSD will be reviewed. This project is supported by the following grants: Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 02130726; Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 01120376; National Natural Science Foundation of China, reference number: 81371460; General Research Fund, reference number: 474513; General Research Fund, reference number: 473712.

Keynote Forum

Jamal Ouazzani

National Center for Scientific Research CNRS, Institute for Chemistry of Natural Products ICSN, France

Keynote: Ethnopharmacology and neurodegenerative diseases: Past achievements and future expectations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jamal Ouazzani photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) cover various pathologies and associated disorders. The most known and disabling are
Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease, causing motor disorders and dementia. NDs affect the
ageing population and represent one of the most challenging public health issues worldwide. The situation is particularly critical
due to the increasing number of patients, the cost of treatment, and the societal impact of day-to-day care and dependence. As
an example, around 7 million European citizens suffer from Alzheimer's disease with a total care cost reaching 155 billion euros
each year. Besides existing drugs addressing the symptoms rather than the cause, alternative natural solutions based on natural
extracts or pure compounds are driving growing interest. This presentation begins with an overview of the current state of the
art in the use of natural resources and the products they contain, to combat the potential causes and consequences of NDs.
We will then move on to the results we have obtained in the field, by using innovative extraction technologies and controlled
biotransformation processes to enhance the effectiveness and the safety of the end products.

Keynote Forum

Jamal Ouazzani

National Center for Scientific Research CNRS, Institute for Chemistry of Natural Products ICSN, France

Keynote: Ethnopharmacology and neurodegenerative diseases: Past achievements and future expectations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jamal Ouazzani photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) cover various pathologies and associated disorders. The most known and disabling are
Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease, causing motor disorders and dementia. NDs affect the
ageing population and represent one of the most challenging public health issues worldwide. The situation is particularly critical
due to the increasing number of patients, the cost of treatment, and the societal impact of day-to-day care and dependence. As
an example, around 7 million European citizens suffer from Alzheimer's disease with a total care cost reaching 155 billion euros
each year. Besides existing drugs addressing the symptoms rather than the cause, alternative natural solutions based on natural
extracts or pure compounds are driving growing interest. This presentation begins with an overview of the current state of the
art in the use of natural resources and the products they contain, to combat the potential causes and consequences of NDs.
We will then move on to the results we have obtained in the field, by using innovative extraction technologies and controlled
biotransformation processes to enhance the effectiveness and the safety of the end products.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dusan Berek photo
Biography:

Dusan Berek, employed at Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. He served as elected member of the Presidium of the Slovak
Academy of Sciences, President of the Slovak Chemical Society, Chairman of the Czecho-Slovak and Slovak National Committees of Chemistry for IUPAC.
Corresponding member of the Central European Academy of Sciences and Academician of the Learned Society of the Slovakia. Author or co-author of two
monographs and 300+ scientific papers in extenso published in refereed periodicals, proceedings and chapters of books, as well as 60+ patents (five of
them were licensed) - cited more than 3,000x. Presented over 140 invited plenary, key and main lectures, as well as over 900 regular lectures and poster
contributions on symposia and conferences, as well as during lecturing tours to over fourty countries. Elected Slovak scientist of the year 1999 and Slovak
innovator of the year 2002.

Abstract:

Synthetic block copolymers represent an important group of advanced materials with numerous specific applications. Polymer chains with different chemical or physical characteristics are bonded together in the block copolymers to obtain required properties. Most block copolymers however, contain free, non-attached chains, their parent homopolymers, which form expensive ballast. The separation and molecular characterization of parent homopolymers from the block copolymers is an analytical challenge. The selectivity of exclusion based gel permeation chromatography, which is commonly applied for separation of macromolecules according to their size, usually does not enable separation of parent homopolymers from the block copolymers. Coupled liquid chromatography methods, CLC that combine exclusion with interaction separation mechanisms may solve the problem. A novel, high selectivity CLC approach is liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption, LC LCD. LC LCD column is packed with polar, porous, adsorptive material. Eluent suppresses sample adsorption. The multicomponent polymers are separated due to the action of a zone of appropriate liquid barrier injected into a column before sample solution. The molecules of the barrier permeate the packing pores and elute slowly, while the pore-excluded macromolecules tend to proceed fast.  The barrier promotes adsorption of interactive polymer chains within the column and decelerates their elution. Then non-interactive chains elute freely. As result, macromolecules with distinct polarities are efficiently separated based on the difference in their adsorptivity. Numerous parent homopolymers were separated from their block copolymers with help of LC LCD.  However, high polarity polymer chains such as poly(4-vinyl pyridine) and poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) are fully retained within common bare silica gel column packing’s even using the strongest desorbing eluents available. To solve the problem, various less polar adsorptive column packing’s were tested. We will show that silica gel with bonded poly(ethylene oxide) chains enables to efficiently separate above parent homopolymers from their block copolymers.

Recent Publications

  1. Berek D (2017) Separation of parent homopolymers from nonpolar block copolymers by means of liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of enthalpic interactions. Macromolecular Chemistry Physics 218:137-142.
  1. Berek D (2016) Critical assessment of “critical” liquid chromatography of block copolymers (2016) Journal of Separation Science 39(1):93–101.
  1. Berek Dand Macova E (2015) Liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption 6: Separation of a four-component polymer blend. Journal of Separation Science 38(4):543-549.
  1. Rollet M, Pelletier B, Altounian A, Berek D and Maria S (2014)  Separation of Parent Homopolymers from Polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene Triblock Copolymers by Means of Liquid Chromatography: 1. Comparison of Different Methods, Analytical Chemistry 86:2694−2702.
  1. Šiskova A, Macova E and Berek D (2012) Liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption 4: Separation of blends containing low-solubility polymers. European Polymer Journal 48(1):155-168.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keynote Forum

Jamal Ouazzani

National Center for Scientific Research CNRS, Institute for Chemistry of Natural Products ICSN, France

Keynote: Ethnopharmacology and neurodegenerative diseases: Past achievements and future expectations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jamal Ouazzani photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) cover various pathologies and associated disorders. The most known and disabling are
Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease, causing motor disorders and dementia. NDs affect the
ageing population and represent one of the most challenging public health issues worldwide. The situation is particularly critical
due to the increasing number of patients, the cost of treatment, and the societal impact of day-to-day care and dependence. As
an example, around 7 million European citizens suffer from Alzheimer's disease with a total care cost reaching 155 billion euros
each year. Besides existing drugs addressing the symptoms rather than the cause, alternative natural solutions based on natural
extracts or pure compounds are driving growing interest. This presentation begins with an overview of the current state of the
art in the use of natural resources and the products they contain, to combat the potential causes and consequences of NDs.
We will then move on to the results we have obtained in the field, by using innovative extraction technologies and controlled
biotransformation processes to enhance the effectiveness and the safety of the end products.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jianyong Wang photo
Biography:

Jerry Wang received his PhD from the Deaprtment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Medical Univisity of Ohio (Toledo, OH). After post-doctoral studies at Univsersity of Michigan Medical Center, he began his industry career as a pharmacologist. He is currently a scientist in the Department of Biochemical and Cellular
Pharmacology at Genentech. His group supports the therapeutic antibody programs during research and early development phases. His main responsibilities include antibody screening and characterization by in vitro and in vivo studies to select clinical candidates. He has worked in biopharmaceutical industry for more
than 15 years including 10 years at Genentech for biotherapeutics R&D.

Abstract:

Assessing immunogenicity, the propensity of a therapeutic protein product (including antibody drugs) to generate immune responses or to induce immunologically related adverse events, is recommended during the development phase of a biotheraputic drug. Even though immunogenicity assessment in nonclinical animal studies are not relevant in predicting potential immunogenicity in humans, it can still be very useful in assisting the interpretation of PK/PD/TK study results. This is because for non-clinical studies, immunogenicity can impact exposure (PK), response (PD & efficacy), and safety (toxicity and adverse events). Thus immunogenicity assessment, i.e. measurement of anti-drug antibodies (ADA), should be evaluated when there are evidence of altered PD activity; unexpected changes in drug exposure in the absence of a PD marker;or evidence of immune-mediated reactions (immune complex disease, vasculitis, anaphylaxis, etc.). In this presentation, several commonly used ADA assay formats and technology platforms will be reviewed. Key assay design elements and assay development procedures, including approaches that improve ADA assay drug tolerance, will be discussed in detail. We will also share ADA results from three monkey PK/PD case studies by comparing different ADA assay formats. Lastly, we will recommend fit-for-purpose strategies of ADA assay development and characterization for non-clinical animal studies.

Keynote Forum

Arie Franx

University Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands

Keynote: Reproduction and pregnancy as stress test for lifelong cardiovascular health
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arie Franx photo
Biography:

Arie Franx holds an MD-degree of the Free University in Amsterdam and a PhD-degree of the University of Utrecht. He specialized in obstetrics/ gynaecology and attended leadership programs at INSEAD (Fontainebleau, France) and at Harvard Business School and Harvard School of Public Health (Boston, MA, USA). He is currently Professor of Obstetrics, Chair of the Division Woman and Baby en Director of the Ob/Gyn Specialty Training in the University Medical Centre Utrecht. His research interest include pregnancy complications, cardiovascular health in women, and organization and quality of care. He has published over 150 papers in international peer-reviewed scientific journals .

Abstract:

The aim of this presentation is to review the relationship of reproductive and pregnancy disorders with cardiovascular disease. Women who experience vascular-related complications in reproduction and pregnancy, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), premature ovarian failure (POI), spontaneous preterm birth (SPB), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and preeclampsia (PE) have increased prevalence of traditional, modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including all the major defining criteria of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that women with PIH and PE are at two to eight fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease at (median) 14 years after pregnancy. Because of the relatively young age at which reproductive and pregnancy complications occur, absolute 10-year CVD risks are low at diagnosis and therefore most current guidelines on CVD risk management do not include recommendations on screening and preventive interventions in these women. Nevertheless, they may benefit from secondary CVD prevention on the long term. We have investigated the feasibility of screening and preventive intervention for CVD risk factors in these women, and also developed a national guideline for cardiovascular risk management in women with reproductive and pregnancy disorders. For a better understanding of the relationship of reproductive and pregnancy disorders with cardiovascular disease, including evidence-based preventative strategies, its pathophysiologic mechanisms need to be unravelled and longer-term follow-up studies are needed to evaluate the development or decline of cardiovascular health in these women in the course of life. Ultimately, cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce CVD in these women needs to be evaluated in large-scale randomized studies.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad A. Obeid photo
Biography:

Mohammad Obeid is an Assistant professor at the Faculty of pharmacy, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan. He is the head of pharmaceutics and pharmaceutical technology department and specialized in designing lipid based nanoparticles as a delivery system. He was successfully developed stable nanoparticles and tested their efficacy in the delivery of different therapeutic agents such as siRNA, curcumin, doxorubicin and various types of antibiotics and vaccines. The aim of his work is to prepare these nanoparticles at industrial scale for large batches production.

 

Abstract:

Purpose:

Lipid nanoparticles are self-assembling vesicles obtained by hydrating a mixture of non-lipids and cholesterol and are suitable as carriers of drugs and biopharmaceuticals. It is desirable to be able to accurately control size and polydispersity of the vesicles as this can impact on biological outcome. Moreover, its crucial to formulate these nanoparticles in a scalable method that can be used in industrial settings. One approach that has been successful for lipid-based systems is the use of microfluidics (MF). In this study we compared a MF-based method with traditional methods such as thin film hydration (TFH) method and heating method using niosomes as a model nanoparticles.

Method:

Niosomes using MF were prepared on a NanoAssemblrÔ. Monopalmitin, cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate were dissolved in ethanol at specific molar ratios. The lipids and aqueous buffer were injected into separate chamber inlets of the micromixer. The flow rate ratio (FRR; ratio between aqueous and solvent streams) and the total flow rate (TFR) of both streams were controlled by syringe pumps. An established TFH and heating methods were used to prepare niosomes followed by extrusion through an Avanti-polar miniextruder. The particles generated from these methods were compared for their size and potential by dynamic light scattering and morphology using atomic force microscopy.

Results and Discussion:

The size of niosomes produced by MF was controlled by altering the FRR and TFR in both the lipid and aqueous phases (Table 1). In contrast, niosomes prepared by the TFH method and heating method were large, polydisperse and required a post-manufacturing extrusion size reduction step (around 4µm ± 0.2 before extrusion). A stability study was performed on NISV generated by both methods, at four temperatures (4, 25, 37 and 50°C) for 4 weeks, and the vesicles were shown to be stable in terms of size and polydispersity index (PDI) (Table 2).

Conclusion:

Stable, controlled size niosomes, were manufactured by MF in seconds. The TFH method and heating method also produced stable niosomes, but the process took several hours and the resulting vesicles were polydisperse and required an extrusion step to control the size. Studies are on-going to determine the drug entrapment efficiency and biological impact of controlled size vesicles.

 

Keynote Forum

Jun Ren

Professor ,University of Wyoming College of Health Sciences

Keynote: Deficiency in the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin Exacerbates Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy: Role of Mitophagy
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jun Ren photo
Biography:

Dr. Ren earned his Ph.D. in 1994 from the University of Alberta, Canada, in the area of cellular physiology, following his medical training in China (Beijing University and Peking Union Medical College). In 1994, he became a post-doctoral fellow in the Wayne State University School of Medicine (Internal Medicine), where he served for two years. He remained at Wayne State University until 1998, working as a research instructor of physiology. He was an Assistant Professor of Physiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences from 1998-2002 and then an Associate Professor of University of Wyoming from 2002-2005. He was promoted to full professor in 2005 and was appointed as Associate Dean for Research in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Ren recently relocated to the Department of Cardiology at Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University. His major area of research is related to cardiac pathophysiology in alcoholism, diabetes, obesity and aging. His research has been funded by the American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association and NIH. He is a first or corresponding author of more than 500 peer-reviewed papers and 200 published abstracts. He is editor or on editorial board for a number of journals including Hypertension, Diabetes, Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, BBA Molecular Basis of Disease, American Journal of Physiology, Cardiovascular Toxicology and Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology.

 

Abstract:

Background: Long-term heavy alcohol consumption has been shown to promote mitochondrial injury, unfavorable geometric and contractile changes in the heart. Parkin, a cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase encoded by PARK2 gene, plays an important role in the regulation of selective mitophagy. This study was designed to examine the role of Parkin in alcohol-induced myocardial injury (aka alcoholic cardiomyopathy) and the underlying mechanism with a focus on mitophagy.

Methods: Adult male wild-type C57 and PARKIN2 knockout (Parkin-/-) mice were placed on alcohol (4%) or control diet for 4 weeks. Echocardiographic and cardiomyocyte mechanical properties were assessed. Mitochondrial morphology, function and mitophagy were examined using transmission electronic microscopy, Clark-type oxygen electrode, and Western blot, respectively.

Results: Our results revealed that chronic alcohol consumption triggered unfavorable geometric and contractile changes [decreased fractional shortening (FS) and ejection fraction (EF), with enlarged left ventricular chamber; decreased peak shortening (PS) and velocity of shortening +dL/dt, increased time-to-90% relengthening TR90], the effects of which were exacerbated by Parkin deficiency. In addition, our data showed that chronic alcohol intake promoted myocardial mitochondrial swelling with cristae disarrangement, induced myocardial mitochondrial depolarization and respiration inhibition, which were exacerbated by Parkin knockout. Furthermore, chronic alcohol consumption promoted accumulation of Parkin and LC3BII in mitochondria and mitochondrial ubiquitination in the heart, the effects of which were nullified by Parkin knockout.

Conclusion: These data suggest that chronic alcohol consumption triggered mitophagy by stimulating Parkin translocation to the mitochondria, which may be an adaptive response in the heart. Our findings implicated the therapeutic potential of mitophagy as a target in the management of alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

 

Keynote Forum

Denis Larrivee

Loyola University Chicago, USA

Keynote: Regulation of global brain states: Orienting oscillatory trajectories
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Denis Larrivee photo
Biography:

Denis Larrivee is a Visiting Scholar at Loyola University Chicago and has held professorships at the Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City and Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. A former fellow at Yale University's Medical School and Department of Biology he received the Association for Research in Vision and Opthalmology's first place award for studies on photoreceptor degenerative and developmental mechanisms. He is the current editor of a text entitled Brain-Computer Interfacing and Brain Dynamics with InTech Publishing and an editorial board member of the journals Annals of Neurology and Neurological Sciences (USA) and EC Neurology (UK). An International Neuroethics Society Expert he is the author of more than 50 papers and book chapters in such varied venues as the Journal of Cell Biology, Journal of Neuroscience, and Journal of Religion and Mental Health, and IEEE Explore

Abstract:

Autonomy, the hallmark of advanced living systems, depends on how the brain and extended nervous system are self-regulated to accommodate the multiplicity of tasks and temporal sequencing that comprises cognitive operation. Directed to the good of the whole organism, self-regulation reveals both the need for and existence of global brain mechanisms that modulate local neural events and oversee their spatiotemporal organization. Hence, there is an implicit coupling between global and local scales that characterize large-scale, systemic operation, requiring that oversight mechanisms be regionally distributed for local activation. Existing evidence indicates that mediating control depends on a distribution of oscillatory, electropotential activity, that is, brain dynamical elements that exhibit repetitive and cyclical profiling. There is a broad consensus that oscillations detectable in EEG patterns, for example, can be grouped in frequency bands denoting different brain states. Because of their significance for human health, this paper considers underlying processes that activate and disengage such oscillatory mechanisms, and that is, therefore, responsible for modulating these states. Controlling such oscillatory networks globally is thought to be achieved through modulation of their frequency patterning, which may, for example, include synchronization, desynchronization, or cross-frequency coupling. Synchronization entails oscillatory overlap, which is thought to bind together various feature elements in cognitive representations, like those of emotions and sensory events; desynchronization, by contrast, entails oscillatory disengagement. Accordingly, the capacity for selectively engaging and disengaging oscillator activity is key to directing different brain states, that is, to mediating the orientation of bifurcations to different dynamical elements. This paper will explore the roles of two processes likely to be critical to inducing regulatory directionality, neural pulsing and neural noise. The two will be considered in the special case of memory circuits, which will be used here as a general model for achieving global brain regulation.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ghanshyam Mali photo
Biography:

Ghanshyam Mali has completed his Master of Pharmacy at the age of 24 years from Manipal University Karnataka, India and currently pursuing his PhD from Jamia Hamdard, deemed to be University, New Delhi. He has more than 5 years of experiance in Medical Writing in Pharmaceutical Organization. He has published 3 papers in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

The use of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues has been linked with the risk of pancreatic and thyroid cancer. Exenatide and liraglutide carry a boxed warning in their pack insert regarding the possible association with medullary thyroid cancer and caution regarding acute pancreatitis. Our objective was to detect from EudraVigilance database, a signal of pancreatic and thyroid cancer with exenatide and liraglutide treatments in patients with diabetes.

Methods: Herein, we analyzed all spontaneous cases of pancreatic and thyroid cancer reported with exenatide and liraglutide in EudraVigilance database from their inception till 30th January 2020. A case/noncase method was used to detect the association, calculating proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) as a measure of disproportionality.

Results: There were 4349 cases of pancreatic cancer and 1697 cases of thyroid cancer in the 6,665,794 reports recorded in EudraVigilance during the study period. From the inception of exenatide and liraglutide, the total numbers of pancreatic cancer cases identified with them in EudraVigilance database were 222 and 313, respectively, and the total numbers of thyroid cancer cases were 36 and 53, respectively. Significant disproportionality was observed between pancreatic cancer and exenatide and liraglutide with PRR of 36.4 (95% CI, 31.8-41.7) and 42.4 (95% CI, 37.7- 47.6), respectively. Disproportionality was also observed between thyroid cancer and exenatide and liraglutide with PRR of 14.7 (95% CI, 10.5-20.4) and 17.6 (95% CI, 13.4-23.2), respectively.

Conclusions: This study based on EudraVigilance database further confirms signals for both thyroid and pancreatic cancer with exenatide and liraglutide.

 

Keynote Forum

Rory Mulvey

AVP & Satellite Communications, USA

Keynote: High Altitude Platform Solutions for Today
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rory Mulvey photo
Biography:

Responsible for Satellite business development in North America and expanding ecosystems within Communication Service Providers. Working with companies that are looking to design new solutions, engineer POC's, take advantage of AI/ML to support networks, enable DevOps and automated Testing Solutions, enable Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and build Software Defined Networks (SDN), provide software frameworks to accelerate growth deployment of new solutions, and design and engineer Cloud ready apps and platforms.

 

Abstract:

Throughout the long term, a few terms have been utilized for this kind of airplane, for example, "High Altitude Powered Platform", "High Altitude Aeronautical Platform", "High Altitude Airship", "Stratospheric Platform", "Stratospheric Airship" and "Environmental Satellite". The expression "High Altitude Long Endurance" (HALE), which has now and then been utilized to name HAP, is commonly more connected with customary automated airborne vehicles (UAVs), with administration roof of around 18 km, as the Global Hawk. Presently, the articulation "High Altitude Platform" (HAP), received by the ITU, has been the most usually utilized

A striking actuality for the HAPs idea was the underlying meaning of a recurrence band for its broadcast communications administrations on the World Radio communication Conference 1997 (WRC-97), sorted out by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which manages the guideline of the utilization of radio frequencies. At this gathering, the expression "High Altitude Platform Station” has been built up, characterized as a broadcast communications station situated at an elevation of 20 to 50 km and at a predetermined fixed direct relative toward the Earth. This reality shows that, at that point, there was a developing enthusiasm for HAP use as a supplement to earthbound and satellite-based correspondences organization.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker James B. McCarthy photo
Biography:

Dr. McCarthy’s publications are in the areas of psychotherapy with adolescents and adults with personality disorders and psychosis, developmental psychopathology, child and adolescent psychotherapy, and thought disorder in children. His research interests include: severe psychopathology in adults and children; child and adolescent psychotherapy; trauma in childhood; thought disorder; cognitive weaknesses in psychopathology.  His recent publications and research projects have focused on psychosis in childhood and adolescence, the continuum of psychosis, and symptom severity and cognitive deficits associated with Major Depression and Bipolar Disorder.

Abstract:

Psychotic symptoms are moderately widespread in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders and are somewhat frequent in children who have been the victims of maltreatment by adults. The incidence of discreet psychotic symptoms among children and adolescents in the United States is between 8% and 9% of the general population.  Aside from psychotic symptoms associated with medical conditions, psychotic manifestations of severe mood disorders, such as Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder have the greatest frequency in addition to the intermittent psychotic features associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in highly traumatized children and youth. There have been groundbreaking advances in understanding the genetics, neurobiology, etiology and developmental course of psychotic disorders in children and adolescents as well as the appropriate utilization of antipsychotic medications. However, psychotic disorders often interrupt cognitive, social and emotional development in children and adolescents leading to noticeably compromised functioning. Several studies colleagues and I and other investigators have conducted suggest that children and adolescents with psychotic features associated with mood disorders have greater cognitive deficits than those who have mood disorders without psychotic features; in addition, cognitive and social declines in children and adolescents with schizophrenia have been well documented. Although there are developmental differences in the symptoms of psychotic disorders and there is considerable variability in the outcome of patients with pediatric psychotic disorders, there is a continuity of psychotic disorders from childhood to adolescence to adulthood. There is thus a critical need for research on the role of psychotherapy, supportive services and cognitive interventions that may help to improve the functioning of very high risk children and those with psychotic disorders. Individual psychotherapy approaches with psychotic children aim to improve reality testing, coping skills and anxiety tolerance while examining the stimuli for the exacerbations of their experience of stress and anxiety.  Studies on family-based psychotherapeutic interventions consistently point to the need for supporting family members and their efforts to try to restore the psychotic child’s age-appropriate functioning.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Tokuşoğlu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Dept of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working
as Associate Professor Dr faculty member in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. Tokuşoğlu
performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington,USA during April-May 2010. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of selected journals. Tokuşoğlu published the scientific edited three international books entitled Fruit and Cereal Bioactives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis,USA Publisher,as third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders by CRC Press,too; Dr Tokusoglu also published three national books entitled Cacao and Chocolate Science and Technology, Special Fruit Olive: Chemistry, Quality and Technology and third one as Frying Oils Science and Technology. She organized and/or administered as Conference Chair and Group Chair of Food and Nutrition at many conferences and congress in different continental countries as majorly in USA, Canada, Europe and Asia Pasific.

Abstract:

Alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring chemical compounds that mostly contain biologically important amine structures and include some related compounds in plants and animal foods. Alkaloids show greatly diverse matrix and origins as well as pharmacological and/or nutraceutical action that often demonstrate a marked physiological action. The only thing that unites all these natural compounds under the term ‘alkaloids’ (alkali-like) is the nitrogen atom that is present in all of them. They are known to be adrenergics, antibiotics,
poisons, stimulants, diuretics, astringents, anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensives, anti-mydriatics, analgesics, anti-gout, expectorant, emetic, anti-spasmodic and many others. Food alkaloids can be take part in chemistry, food industrial applications, food supplement and medical drug fortifier. Chemical alkaloid taxonomy in plants and animal foods, originating from protein and aminoacids like this xanthinealkaloids, phenolic based alkaloids, originating from plant cell cultures, pseudoalkaloids, ergot alkaloids and tropane alkaloids in plants and cereals, glycoalkaloids in potatoes, their properties, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical effects. It has been carried out methylxanthine alkaloids including caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in most consumed non-alcoholic beverages such as tea, coffee, cocoa majorly and chocolate and herbal teas as less. Phenolic alkaloids containing piperidine alkaloid from black pepper with pyridine structure and sanguinarine, narceine alkaloids from pomegranate fruits with isoquinoline based structure are also important compounds. Alkaloids are usually derivatives of aminoacids, many have a bitter taste and are found as secondary metabolites in plants (including potatoes glycoalkaloids as solanine, solanidine and their derivatives and tomato glycoalkaloids as
tomatine), animals (such as shellfish neurotoxic alkaloids and marine alkaloids; saxitoxin and its analogs), and fungi alkaloids. Many plant and marine based alkaloids are poisonous at dose over, but some are used medicinally as analgesics (pain relievers) or anesthetic, particulary morphine and codeine; some as vinblastine are used to treating certain cancer types. Taxol is an anti-cancer (antineoplastic or cytotoxic) chemotherapy drug and taxol is classified as a plant alkaloid, a taxane and an antimicrotubule agent. As others, phenethylamine alkaloid ephedrine is also used as stimulant, decongestant and appetite suppressant in diet processed foods and nutraceuticals. A specific alkaloids in foods can alter after food processing. In this point; toxicity, carcinogenic,
toxigenic structure and cancer formation should be dealed. Food sensitivity is an adverse reaction to a food which other people can safely eat, and includes food allergies, food intolerances, microbial toxications, and chemical sensitivities, whereas food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by body’s immune system. Foodborne allergic reactions can sometimes cause serious illness and death. Food allergy is a reaction of the body’s immune system to a certain food or beverage. In this context, food allergy is a very specific reaction involving the immune system of the body. At this point, distinguishing food allergy from other food sensitivities is the most important. Whereas food allergies are rare, food intolerances, which are the other  classification of food sensitivities, are more prevalent. Several specific foods are responsible for the majority of food allergies, even though any food can stimulate an immune response in allergic individuals. It is known that peanuts are the leading cause of severe allergic reactions, followed by shellfish, fish, tree nuts, and eggs. Peanuts, tree nuts including almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts (filberts), macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts (pignolias), pistachio nuts, walnuts, sesame seeds, milk, eggs, fish including shellfish and crustaceans, soy, glüten, fava beans, garlic and onion, mustard are some of the most known allergic foods. HHP processing improved the reducing of allergenic structure and allergenicity of some foods. Recently, limited studies have
been performed on HHP effects on the structure of known allergens and the elimination of allergen compounds in foods. Further studies are needed for some allergenic proteins in various food matrices.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker JPN Mishra photo
Biography:

J P N Mishra has his basic expertise in Life Science with specialization in Human Physiology. His previous dimensions of research included the discipline of Neurobiology, Sleep Medicine and Yogic sciences. He has explored the mechanism of operation in Circadian rhythm and sleep quality following yoga practices. His area of research also includes applied efficacy of different natural phytochemicals on various carcinoma cells.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The system of Preksha Meditation (PM) is originated from Jain Canonical literature which is based on “Perception of Thoughts”. It is imbued with spiritual powers that cleanse the mind and body of negative energy and thereby facilitate the improvement in various sensory and motor functions of brain, reduces level of stress and enhances the sleep quality and level of consciousness.

Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of PM on adolescent post-graduate students by measuring parameters related to psychological status, neurological functions, sleep quality and level of consciousness.

Methodology: Four components of PM were applied on 50 adolescents. The assessment parameters viz. alpha brain waves, sleep duration, component of REM and Non-REM, Sleep spindles; awareness subjectivity and state of awareness; neurotic reactions, anxiety level, mental ability, fear and emotional level were applied.

Findings: The experimental participant students exhibited significantly enhanced number of alpha brain wave omission and reduced level of stress hormones in blood, which led them to remain in state of relaxation. Total Non-REM duration of sleep was found increased with significantly improved sleep quality too, with greater awareness. They were having reduced fear, frustration and anxiety level and emotionally well balanced.

Conclusion with Significance: Synchronization of brain waves with alpha waves predominating may be correlated with deep relaxation associated with better sleep quality and improved psychological state. Positive changes recorded may be attributed to decreased sympathetic activity and parasympathetic dominance, modulated by cortical functions in Central Nervous System. Findings of the study provided a viable and composite programme for health and well-being in adolescents.

Recent Publications:

• Singh A and Srinivasan N (2019) Concentrative (Sahaj Samadhi) meditation expands subjective time. PsyCh J 8(1):28-35.

• Deepak KK (2019) Meditation induces physical relaxation and enhances cognition: A perplexing paradox. Progress in Brain Research 244:85-99.

• Parker S (2019) Training attention for conscious non-REM sleep: The yogic practice of yoganidrā and its implications for neuroscience research. Progress in Brain Research 244:255-272.

• Raffone A, Marzetti L Del Gratta C2, Perrucci MG, Romani GL and Pizzella V (2019) Toward a brain theory of meditation. Prog Brain Res. 244:207-232.

• Balaji PA, Varne SR and Ali SS (2012) Physiological effects of yogic practices and transcendental  meditation in health and disease. North American Jounals of Medical Sciences 4(10):442-448.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marja T Nevalainen photo
Biography:

Marja Nevalainen, MD, PhD is an internationally recognized leader in the field of cytokine and steroid hormone signaling in prostate cancer. Dr Nevalainen holds the title of Eminent Scholar at MCW. She is also Director of Prostate Cancer Center of Excellence at MCW Cancer Center, which is a multi-disciplinary hub for prostate cancer research with an international collaborative network. Dr Nevalainen serves as Assistant Dean for Research at MCW, and Associate Director of Education for the MCW Cancer Center. Her primary appointment is in the Department of Pathology, and a secondary appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

 

Abstract:

Jak2-Stat5 signaling plays a significant role in promoting growth and progression of Bcr-Abl-driven hematological malignancies as well as prostate cancer. Bypassing tyrosine kinases compelled for Stat5a/b phosphorylation would be favourable for therapy development for Stat5a/b- controlled cancers. To identify small-molecule inhibitors of Stat5a/b for lead optimization and therapy development, in silico screening of chemical structure databases combined with medicinal chemistry was used for identification of a group of small-molecule forestalling to block SH2-domain-mediated docking of Stat5a/b to the receptor-kinase complex and subsequent phosphorylation and dimerization. The lead compound Inhibitor of Stat5, IST5-002, (IST5) binds directly to the SH2-domain of Stat5 in fluorescence polarization assays. We additionally tried the viability of the lead-compound IST5 in exploratory models and patient examples of two best-known Stat5a/b-driven tumors, prostate cancer (PC) and interminable myeloid leukemia (CML). IST5 forestalled both Jak2 and Bcr-Abl-interceded phosphorylation and dimerization of Stat5a/b, and specifically hindered the transcriptional action of Stat5a (IC50 1.5μM) and Stat5b (IC50 3.5μM). IST5 suppressed nuclear translocation of Stat5a/b, binding to DNA and Stat5a/b target gene expression. IST5 had no significant inhibitory activity on a panel of 52 kinases, including Jak2 and Abl. Importantly, no signs of toxicity were noted at the dose of 100 mg/kg in acute or chronic toxicity studies conducted in mice. IST5 incited broad apoptosis of PC cells, weakened development of PC xenograft tumors and prompted cell demise in quiet inferred PCs when tried ex vivo in explant organ societies. Critically, IST5 initiated hearty apoptotic passing of imatinib-delicate as well as imatinib-safe unending myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines and essential CML cells from patients. IST5 gives a lead structure to advance synthetic alterations for clinical improvement for Stat5a/b-driven strong tumors and hematological malignancies.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marja T Nevalainen photo
Biography:

Marja Nevalainen, MD, PhD is an internationally recognized leader in the field of cytokine and steroid hormone signaling in prostate cancer. Dr Nevalainen holds the title of Eminent Scholar at MCW. She is also Director of Prostate Cancer Center of Excellence at MCW Cancer Center, which is a multi-disciplinary hub for prostate cancer research with an international collaborative network. Dr Nevalainen serves as Assistant Dean for Research at MCW, and Associate Director of Education for the MCW Cancer Center. Her primary appointment is in the Department of Pathology, and a secondary appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

 

Abstract:

Jak2-Stat5 signaling plays a significant role in promoting growth and progression of Bcr-Abl-driven hematological malignancies as well as prostate cancer. Bypassing tyrosine kinases compelled for Stat5a/b phosphorylation would be favourable for therapy development for Stat5a/b- controlled cancers. To identify small-molecule inhibitors of Stat5a/b for lead optimization and therapy development, in silico screening of chemical structure databases combined with medicinal chemistry was used for identification of a group of small-molecule forestalling to block SH2-domain-mediated docking of Stat5a/b to the receptor-kinase complex and subsequent phosphorylation and dimerization. The lead compound Inhibitor of Stat5, IST5-002, (IST5) binds directly to the SH2-domain of Stat5 in fluorescence polarization assays. We additionally tried the viability of the lead-compound IST5 in exploratory models and patient examples of two best-known Stat5a/b-driven tumors, prostate cancer (PC) and interminable myeloid leukemia (CML). IST5 forestalled both Jak2 and Bcr-Abl-interceded phosphorylation and dimerization of Stat5a/b, and specifically hindered the transcriptional action of Stat5a (IC50 1.5μM) and Stat5b (IC50 3.5μM). IST5 suppressed nuclear translocation of Stat5a/b, binding to DNA and Stat5a/b target gene expression. IST5 had no significant inhibitory activity on a panel of 52 kinases, including Jak2 and Abl. Importantly, no signs of toxicity were noted at the dose of 100 mg/kg in acute or chronic toxicity studies conducted in mice. IST5 incited broad apoptosis of PC cells, weakened development of PC xenograft tumors and prompted cell demise in quiet inferred PCs when tried ex vivo in explant organ societies. Critically, IST5 initiated hearty apoptotic passing of imatinib-delicate as well as imatinib-safe unending myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines and essential CML cells from patients. IST5 gives a lead structure to advance synthetic alterations for clinical improvement for Stat5a/b-driven strong tumors and hematological malignancies.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker David M Parish photo
Biography:

David M. Parish Staff Scientist in Protective & Marine Division at Sherwin Williams Company Staff Scientist at Glatfelter, Chilicothe, OH. Sean Zuckerman, PhD (2013): Case Western Reserve University, and Nivasu Venkata Muram, PhD (2012). Ohio State University – BS (Organic Chemistry), 1986.

Collaborators & Other Affiliations- Horst von Recum, PhD (Biomedical Engineering, Case); Patrick Ziemer (Corporate Polymers Group, Sherwin Williams (SHW)); Andrew Taylor, PhD (Lead Scientist-UK, SHW); Petra Allef, PhD (Innovation, Evonik); Thomas Klotzbach, PhD (Senior Lab Manager-Additives & Silicone Resins, Evonik); Gerald L. Witucki, (Assoc. Scientist, DOW Corning); Maria Nargiello, PhD, (Technical Director, Evonik); Jeffery A. Klang, PhD (R&D Manager, Sartomer Corp.); Leo J. Procopio, PhD (Group Leader-Industrial Coatings, DOW); Seth T. Taylor, PhD (Senior Materials Engineer, Chevron); Jacque Pointcloux, PhD ( Technical Manager, Huntsman Corp.); Ray Drumwright, PhD (Research Fellow, DOW); Dean Webster, PhD (Coatings Science &Technology, Dean, NDSU); William D. Coggio, PhD (Bio-derived Raw Materials, Bio Amber, Inc.)

 

Abstract:

Academia has always used analytical techniques to characterize, test, and further promote the outcome of their respective research. Industry, on the other hand, has primarily utilized analytical science as a forensic tool to help solve product and/or process issues. Each endeavor has merit, and definitely is needed, especially in their respective genre. Each physical laboratory is constructed with these types of needs in mind. The Academic laboratory usually contains the equipment required to perform these analytical functions, since it is so central to their project work. Whereas, most industrial laboratories have a completely separated analytical department/lab area due to the fact that their major function is in support of the sales and/or manufacturing arm of the company.

These two endeavors need to be better aligned, such that industry can learn from Academia the importance of analytical sciences to build robust formulations/products during the development phase in order to eliminate the potential for problems after product launch. This will also allow for the building of a better understanding of the structure/property relationship.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hazem Gallagher-Alagha photo
Biography:

Hazem Gallagher-Alagha has completed his Membership of the Faculty of Occupational Medicne at the Royal College of Physicians of London in 2015. He is the Head of the Department of Occupational Medicine in Qatar Airways Clinic in Doha. He is an Honorary Clinical Lecturer at the University of Glasgow.

Abstract:

This study aimed to establish whether the results of repeat Health Surveillance (HS) for Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) are predictive of the development of new cases and the progression of existing cases of HAVS amongst exposed employees. A secondary objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures for Hand Transmitted Vibration (HTV) exposure. The study describes and analyses trends of HS scores over 10 years. The use of previous HS records allows for the retrospective analysis trends of annual HS results and scores. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate
that the number of new cases of HAVS in the exposed population declined sharply between 2003 and 2007 and continued to decline, albeit it at a lesser rate between 2007 and 2012, Using HS scores as a linear function of time, the results suggest that scores consistently decreased over time and that the influence of time on the scores was highly significant in all cases. Annual HS for HAVS is, to an extent, predictive of the development of new cases and the progression of existing ones amongst exposed employees. Furthermore, it can be demonstrated that control measures are relatively effective for Hand Transmitted Vibration exposure

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anna Tompa photo
Biography:

Anna Tompa, Semmelweis University, Hungary

  • Occupations:
  • University: Semmelweis University Faculty of Medicine 1964-1970
  • Institute of Pathology and Cancer Research: assistant professor: from 1970 to 1979
  • Eppley Institute Omaha NE. visiting scientist: from1976 to1978.
  • National Institute of Occupational Health: chief scientist, from 1979 to 1998
  • DKFZ, Heidelberg: visiting scientist  annually one month from 1986 to 1989
  • National Institute of Chemical Safety: director from1998 to 2005
  • present: research director
  • Semmelweis University Department of Public Health: professor and director from 2005 to 2010,
  • present: deputy director
  • Memberships:
  • The International society for Preventive Oncology
  • European Association of Public Health
  • Fellow of Collegium Ramazzini
  • European Association of Oncology
  • European Association of Mutagenesis

 

Abstract:

Health professionals chronically exposed to anesthetic gases in the operating rooms are at higher risk of lung diseases, hematological, immunological and reproductive alterations. Anesthetic gas exposure often exceeds the safety limits, especially in the case of pediatric anesthetists, or when no proper ventilation has been installed in operating theaters. In the present study we assessed the health risk among anesthetics exposed nurses and measured genotoxicological and immune parameters in the presence or absence of confounding factors such as smoking. The investigations were carried out in 127 subjects exposed to anesthetic gases from health services. The data was compared to healthy, non-exposed controls. The measured biomarkers were: clinical laboratory routine tests, completed with genotoxicological (chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchange), and immunotoxicological monitoring (ratio of lymphocyte subpopulations and activation of lymphocytes). In the group of health personnel exposed to anesthetic gases, we did not find significant changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations or sister-chromatid exchanges. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the ratio of CD25+/CD8+ cells - activated cytotoxic T cells - compared to the control. In workplaces where protective measures were strictly adhered to (with quality assurance) the activation of lymphocytes was at control level. However, where there was no quality assurance, activation of lymphocytes increased significantly compared to the control. In the anesthetic gas exposed smokers, there was a statistically significant shift in the T cell subpopulations: the percentage of helper T cells increased, while the percentage of cytotoxic T cell decreased, leading to an elevated Th/Tc ratio compared to the nonsmokers. The frequency of sister-chromatid exchanges also increased significantly compared to nonsmokers. We also found that anaemia, elevated serum glucose levels, thyroid dysfunction and benign tumours were more frequent in the exposed group than in controls. Our results suggest that our biomarkers can be useful in tracking occupational/environmental immunotoxic effects. We can confirm that quality assurance and protective measures can prevent exposures to harmful substances, and have shown that smoking as a confounding factor has to be taken into account when assessing occupational exposures.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Douglas N Ishii photo
Biography:

Douglas N Ishii was born in US concentration camp at the onset of WWII, and grew up in a government housing project in San Francisco. He received a B.A. Biochemistry from Univ. Calif. Berkeley, a Ph.D. Pharmacology from Stanford Univ. Medical Sch., and conducted postdoctoral work in Neurobiology at Stanford. He became Assistant than Associate Prof. Pharmacology at Columbia Univ. NYC. He is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State Univ. He served on various scientific study sections for National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the Juvenile Diabetes nternational Foundation. Press coverage on his laboratory’s research on pathogenesis of diabetic neurological complications, and causation of brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease, includes articles in Der Spiegel, Hong Kong Standard, NY Times, LA Times, Denver Post, Chicago Tribune, ABC News, Forbes News, USA Today, National Public Radio, and elsewhere. Nineteen patents were awarded based on this research.

Abstract:

Statement of Problem: A meta-analysis of clinical trials with 34,533 T2D patients shows that intensive lowering of glucose
levels does not prevent neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular death, nor excess mortality. Exposing patients to
adverse effects from unbeneficial drugs is unjustified, yet remains standard therapy. An alternative hypothesis for pathogenesis of diabetic complications is greatly needed to develop meaningful rational therapies.
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Following discovery that insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are neurotrophic factors, the inter-related hypotheses were developed that loss of insulin and IGF activities is the dominant cause of diabetic neuropathy, and that replacement of such activities should ameliorate diabetic complications irrespective of unabated hyperglycemia. These hypotheses were tested by infusing IGFs, insulin, or their combination into diabetic rats to determine whether neuropathy is alleviated under conditions in which hyperglycemia is not prevented.
Conclusion & Significance: IGF gene expression is reduced in peripheral nerves, brain and spinal cord in diabetes. Replacement
IGF infusion prevented impaired sensory and motor nerve regeneration, hyperalgesia, abnormal ultrastructure in autonomic
axons, loss of epidermal nerve fiber density, and poor gastric wound healing, but did not diminish hyperglycemia. To study mechanism, insulin and/or IGF was infused into diabetic rat brains under conditions that did not reduce hyperglycemia. A decrease in total mRNA, protein, and DNA levels was associated with brain atrophy and impaired learning/memory in diabetic rats. Insulin and IGF i.c.v. infusion prevented all of these disturbances despite unabated hyperglycemia. Insulin and IGFs are master switches controlling the levels of hundreds of proteins in tissues; loss of protein regulation, not hyperglycemia, is proposed as the most likely pathogenic cause for diabetic complications. Governments should manufacture clinical grade IGF (off-patent). Clinical trials are urgently needed to test insulin/IGF therapy.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cris Renata Grou Volpe photo
Biography:

Cris Renata Grou Volpe has completed her PhD in Nursing from the Graduate Nursing Program University of Brasilia UNB, Brazil, at the age of 30 years. She is a professor of College of Ceilandia, University of Brasilia, Brazil. It has experience in nursing, with emphasis on fundamental nursing, medical and gerontology acting on the following topics: nursing in adult health and elderly, medicine, nursing in public health, semiotics / semiotics and nursing process. She has over 200 publications that have been cited over 200 times, and her publication H-index is 20 and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed Journals.

Abstract:

Objective: To measure the patient's safety culture and climate in a private hospital according to the nursing professionals' vision.

Method: Quantitative, exploratory cross-sectional study between June and July 2018 with 313 nursing professionals. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used to collect data. In the analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the groups.

Results: The institution did not present a score for a favorable climate for patient safety. Significant differences (p <0.001) were identified between the domains: Safety climate, teamwork climate, work satisfaction, perception of stress and perception of unit management. Conclusion: The SAQ demonstrated fragility for the safety climate and was able to detect significant needs for patient safety, indicating areas that need to be worked at the managerial level to have an impact on the operational sphere.

Keywords: Safety patient; Culture; Nursing; Perception; Evaluation

Keynote Forum

Christopher Niezrecki

Chair, Professor, Director - Center for Wind Energy, Co-director - Structural Dynamics & Acoustic Systems Laboratory

Keynote: Recent advances in wind turbine technologies and sensing for structural health monitoring
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christopher Niezrecki photo
Biography:

Dr. Niezrecki is Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the Co-Director of the Structural Dynamics and Acoustics Systems Laboratory, the Director of the Center for Wind Energy at UML, and also the Director of the National Science Foundation-Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Wind Energy Science, Technology and Research (Windstar). He has been directly involved in structural dynamics, acoustics, smart structures and materials, and sensing research for over 23 years, with more than 100 publications.  He has conducted over $11M USD of sponsored research through grants from numerous federal and state agencies as well as several companies.

Abstract:

A significant amount of interest exists in performing wind turbine structural health monitoring, characterization, and evaluation.  The presentation highlights some recent advances in optical sensing, acoustic methods, infrared, UAV sensing, and radar technologies that can be applied to characterize wind turbine structural health, structural dynamics, damage, and embedded defects.  Non-contacting, full-field surface dynamic measurements are presented that leverage three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC), point tracking (PT), and motion magnification methods.  The approaches are able to obtain full-field geometry data, in three dimensions.  Information about the change in geometry of an object over time can be found by comparing a sequence of images and virtual strain gages (or position sensors) can be applied over the entire visible surface of an object of interest.  Non-contact structural dynamic information can be extracted.  Results from the structural interrogation of acoustic monitoring, infrared sensing, and radar sensing are also presented on a variety of test objects.  Several examples of various sensing technologies are presented on wind turbine rotors and blades.  Additionally, some recent advances in wind energy research that originated within the National Science Foundation-Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Wind Energy Science, Technology and Research (Windstar) will be presented.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter Bernius  photo
Biography:

Dr Peter Bernius studied medicine at the University of Heidelberg. In his orthopaedic and pediatric orthopaedic training, he went through various stages at the Surgical Clinic in Darmstadt, at the University Hospital Oskar-Helene-Heim in Berlin and the University Hospital in Freiburg. Since 2001 Dr Bernius works as chief physician of the Center for Pediatric and Neuro-Orthopedics of the Schön Klinik Munich Harlaching. He is an internationally recognized specialist in minimally invasive surgical procedures, early functional rehabilitation, functional orthotics, and specialized learning programs to support neuroplastic regeneration

Abstract:

Introduction:
Hips displacement is one of the main problems in children with cerebral palsy behind pes eqinus. Without treatment we see a progression of about 7% per year (Terjesen et al 2006). Main cause beside belayed verticalisation is pathologic muscle drawing of hip surrounding muscles (Flynn et al 2002, Cornell et al. 1995, doll et al 2006). Mostly concerned are children with restricted possibility of walking and standing self-contained, which is graded with the gross motor function classification system.

Methods:

It is common to stabilize muscle imbalance with soft tissue balancing in young age. Here we prefer percutaneous myofasziotomie to lengthen short muscle. The iliopsoas muscle must be lengthen with an mini-open access.
As muscle lengthening is not sufficient enough in risky hips in older patients, we use additional growth guiding as a minimal invasive method to prohibit further hip displacement. Therefore two studies could show a positive effect (Lee et al 2016, Portinaro et al 2016).

Results:
In 99 hips observed for in mean 4,2 years in children with GMFCS 3-5 under 6 years we found an improvement of hip displacement in 33%, a worsening in 5% and a stabilization in 62% as reported in Congress Focus CP 2019.

In our patients older than 6 years we combined percutaneous myofasziotomy with guided growth of the femoral head and we found in 16 hips a mean improvement of migration index of 5% and an improvement of femoral neck ankle of 9° within 16 month mean follow up as we reported in 2018 during the congress for orthopaedic child surgery in Dresden.

Discussion:

Minimal invasive soft tissue release seem to be as effective as open release as performed in many countries with hip surveyance programs and recovery of children treated minimal invasively is faster. Less surgical dissection, faster recovery of motion, and less comorbidity than varus osteotomy make guided growth surgery a treatment option for coxa valga in spastic hip displacement in nonambulant cerebral palsy children.

Conclusion:
Further studies must show the efficiency of this method in long term

Keynote Forum

Rafal Abdank-Kozubski

Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland

Keynote: Chemical ordering phenomena in nanostructured FePt: Monte Carlo simulations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rafal Abdank-Kozubski photo
Biography:

Rafal Kozubski has completed his PhD from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1984. He has worked as a Post-doctorate at the Strasbourg Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials (IPCMS), France (1987 to 1988). He was an Academic Visitor in the Institute for Applied Physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland (1988 and 1990). He also stayed at the Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Vienna, Austria as a Lise-Meitner Fellow from 1993 to 1995. After completing his Habilitation (DSc) from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1997, he has worked there as an Associate Professor (1997-2006) and in 2006, he was appointed as Full Professor at the same university. His international experience includes International Fellowship at the Queen’s University in Belfast (2006-2008) and Visiting Professorships at the L.Pasteur University in Strasbourg/University of Strasbourg, France (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011). In 2016, he was appointed as a Conjoint Professor of the University of Newcastle, Australia. He has published over 100 scientific papers in international reviewed journals and is an author of over 150
communications on international conferences.

Abstract:

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies of free-surface-induced selective destabilization of L10 superstructure variants in FePt
nanolayers, nanowires and nanoparticles were carried out. The system was modeled with nn and nnn interatomic pair interactions deduced from ab initio results for Fe-Pt. The heterogeneous nucleation of a- and b-L10 variant domains reported previously for FePt nanolayers was induced by the (100)-type surfaces limiting the nanostructures. While the initial c-variant L10 superstructure of nanowires transformed totally to the L10 a-variant with Fe and Pt monoatomic planes perpendicular to the wire axis and to both (010) and (001) surfaces, in the case of nanocubes the competition between the a- and b-variant L1domains nucleating at the (100), (010) and (001) surfaces resulted in suppression of their growth. As a consequence, most of the cube volume remained untransformed and showed the c-variant L10 chemical long-range order (LRO) with a degree lowered by homogeneously creating antisite defects. The results quantified by the calculated a- and b-L10 domain penetration depth and the LRO and SRO degree in particular cases are important for the development of magnetic storage media technologies
requiring stable L10 superstructure variants determining easy magnetization directions.

Keynote Forum

Rafal Abdank-Kozubski

Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland

Keynote: Chemical ordering phenomena in nanostructured FePt: Monte Carlo simulations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rafal Abdank-Kozubski photo
Biography:

Rafal Kozubski has completed his PhD from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1984. He has worked as a Post-doctorate at the Strasbourg Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials (IPCMS), France (1987 to 1988). He was an Academic Visitor in the Institute for Applied Physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland (1988 and 1990). He also stayed at the Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Vienna, Austria as a Lise-Meitner Fellow from 1993 to 1995. After completing his Habilitation (DSc) from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1997, he has worked there as an Associate Professor (1997-2006) and in 2006, he was appointed as Full Professor at the same university. His international experience includes International Fellowship at the Queen’s University in Belfast (2006-2008) and Visiting Professorships at the L.Pasteur University in Strasbourg/University of Strasbourg, France (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011). In 2016, he was appointed as a Conjoint Professor of the University of Newcastle, Australia. He has published over 100 scientific papers in international reviewed journals and is an author of over 150
communications on international conferences.

Abstract:

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies of free-surface-induced selective destabilization of L10 superstructure variants in FePt
nanolayers, nanowires and nanoparticles were carried out. The system was modeled with nn and nnn interatomic pair interactions deduced from ab initio results for Fe-Pt. The heterogeneous nucleation of a- and b-L10 variant domains reported previously for FePt nanolayers was induced by the (100)-type surfaces limiting the nanostructures. While the initial c-variant L10 superstructure of nanowires transformed totally to the L10 a-variant with Fe and Pt monoatomic planes perpendicular to the wire axis and to both (010) and (001) surfaces, in the case of nanocubes the competition between the a- and b-variant L1domains nucleating at the (100), (010) and (001) surfaces resulted in suppression of their growth. As a consequence, most of the cube volume remained untransformed and showed the c-variant L10 chemical long-range order (LRO) with a degree lowered by homogeneously creating antisite defects. The results quantified by the calculated a- and b-L10 domain penetration depth and the LRO and SRO degree in particular cases are important for the development of magnetic storage media technologies
requiring stable L10 superstructure variants determining easy magnetization directions.

Keynote Forum

Rafal Abdank-Kozubski

Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland

Keynote: Chemical ordering phenomena in nanostructured FePt: Monte Carlo simulations
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rafal Abdank-Kozubski photo
Biography:

Rafal Kozubski has completed his PhD from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1984. He has worked as a Post-doctorate at the Strasbourg Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials (IPCMS), France (1987 to 1988). He was an Academic Visitor in the Institute for Applied Physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland (1988 and 1990). He also stayed at the Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Vienna, Austria as a Lise-Meitner Fellow from 1993 to 1995. After completing his Habilitation (DSc) from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków in 1997, he has worked there as an Associate Professor (1997-2006) and in 2006, he was appointed as Full Professor at the same university. His international experience includes International Fellowship at the Queen’s University in Belfast (2006-2008) and Visiting Professorships at the L.Pasteur University in Strasbourg/University of Strasbourg, France (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011). In 2016, he was appointed as a Conjoint Professor of the University of Newcastle, Australia. He has published over 100 scientific papers in international reviewed journals and is an author of over 150
communications on international conferences.

Abstract:

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies of free-surface-induced selective destabilization of L10 superstructure variants in FePt
nanolayers, nanowires and nanoparticles were carried out. The system was modeled with nn and nnn interatomic pair interactions deduced from ab initio results for Fe-Pt. The heterogeneous nucleation of a- and b-L10 variant domains reported previously for FePt nanolayers was induced by the (100)-type surfaces limiting the nanostructures. While the initial c-variant L10 superstructure of nanowires transformed totally to the L10 a-variant with Fe and Pt monoatomic planes perpendicular to the wire axis and to both (010) and (001) surfaces, in the case of nanocubes the competition between the a- and b-variant L1domains nucleating at the (100), (010) and (001) surfaces resulted in suppression of their growth. As a consequence, most of the cube volume remained untransformed and showed the c-variant L10 chemical long-range order (LRO) with a degree lowered by homogeneously creating antisite defects. The results quantified by the calculated a- and b-L10 domain penetration depth and the LRO and SRO degree in particular cases are important for the development of magnetic storage media technologies
requiring stable L10 superstructure variants determining easy magnetization directions.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wondu Reta Demissie photo
Biography:

Krzysztof Cudzik is a Medical doctor, graduate from Warsaw Medical University, Poland in 2017. In 2018 he started his residency in internal medicine on Cardiology Ward in District Hospital in Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski.

Abstract:

Aim and Objective: The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias among patients with COPD

Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on COPD patients visiting chest clinic of Jimma Medical Center (JMC) located at Jimma town, South west Ethiopia; from May 18 to August 18, 2017 G.C. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 80 sampled COPD patients; and an investigation for 12 Lead resting supine ECG was performed. The results of ECG patterns and other variables were entered into EPI data (3.1) and exported to SPSS (20) for further analysis.

Results: The prevalence of arrhythmia accounted for 50% and the magnitude of its types were classified as Sinus origin arrhythmia (30%) specifically [Sinus bradycardia (16.3%), Sinus tachycardia (8.8%) and Sinus arrhythmia (5.0%)], Ectopic arrhythmia (20%) specifically [Premature ventricular Contraction (7.5%), Atrial fibrillation (6.3%), Premature atrial contraction (3.8%), Atrial flutter (1.3%) and Multi focal atrial tachycardia (1.3%)], Conduction block arrhythmia (23.8%) specifically[Bundle branch block (17.5%) for instance: Complete right bundle branch block (3.8%), Complete left bundle branch block (5%), Incomplete right bundle branch block (7.5%), Incomplete left bundle branch block (1.3%), Hemi fasicular block (5%)] and Atrioventricular block (1.3%)], and Other arrhythmia (11.4%) like Prolonged QTc interval (8.8%) and Preexcitation syndrome or Wolf Parkinson white syndrome (2.5%) as a single COPD patient presented with more than one arrhythmias.

Conclusion: Routine ECG investigation should be performed at the setup to screen and initiate early management of Cardio vascular diseases including cardiac arrhythmias for better prognosis COPD patients which was inevitable and very common.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arup K Indra photo
Biography:

Arup K Indra has done his PhD in 2001 from Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India and did his postdoctoral training on Nuclear receptor signaling in Institut Génétique Biologie Moléculaire Cellulaire (IGBMC), ILLKIRCH, France under the guidance of Prof Pierre Chambon. He is currently an Associate Professor in the OSU/OHSU College of Pharmacy and co-director of the OHSU-OSU Cancer Prevention and Control Initiative. He has published more than 43 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member in many journals. He regularly serves on the grant review panel for NIH, DOD and Welcome Trust, UK.

Abstract:

Surgical site infections constitute nearly 25% of all healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and are the most common cause of infections in patients undergoing surgery. Current treatment plan utilizes wound dressings that deliver antibiotics, but their use can lead to selection and survival of drug-resistant microorganisms. The increasing frequency of multidrug-resistant bacterial species highlights the need for new approaches with distinct modes of action in order to boost the antimicrobial treatment modules used for prevention of surgical site infections. In collaboration, we and others have demonstrated that 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3[(1,25(OH)2D3); an active and more potent form of vitamin D] induces expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene, the encoded hCAP18 protein and secretion of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 that is cleaved from the C-terminal end of hCAP18 in human immune cells, epithelial cells and skin keratinocytes. We recently demonstrated that local sustained delivery of 1,25(OH)2D3 by biocompatible and biodegradable, nanofibrous dressings can induce expression of endogenous antimicrobial peptide hCAP18/LL-37 in vitro in keratinocytes and immune cells, in vivo in skin wounds from a humanized transgenic mouse that expresses a human hCAMP gene, and in ex vivo human skin wounds. We also showed that nanofibers loaded with Calcipotriol, a low calcemic analog of 1,25(OH)2D3 can accelerate cutaneous wound healing and promote efficient wound closure in vivo in the humanized mouse model expressing the human CAMP gene (hCAMP) in place of the mouse counterpart.  The cellular and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient wound healing following treatment with Vitamin D3 loaded nanofibers is currently being investigated.

Keynote Forum

Prof.Antonio Iannetti

Professor

Keynote: Liver Diseases and Hepatology
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof.Antonio Iannetti photo
Biography:

Degree in Medicine and Surgery and Specialties in "Gastroenterology" and "Internal Medicine" at the University of Rome.

1980-1983 University of Los Angeles (USA), he is interested endoscopic sclerosis of esophageal varices and retrograde cholangiopancreatography-endoscopically.

University Professor - Chair of Gastroenterology - University of Rome.

Head of the Digestive Endoscopy Service of the University Hospital Umberto I in Rome.

Professor of "Endoscopy" and "Digestive System Diseases" at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome - "La Sapienza."

Lecturer in E.C.M. Courses (Continuing Medical Education), national and international.

Expert of the Ministry of Health for Gastroenterology

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Carol Wells

Canadore College, Canada

Keynote: Unhealthy mouth = Unhealthy body
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Carol Wells photo
Biography:

Carol Wells graduated from Canadore College, North Bay, Ontario Canada in 1977 with a degree in Dental Hygiene. Graduated with Honors from Expanded Duties Program Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1991.  Carol worked in private practice from 1977 till 2007.  During her career as a clinical dental hygienist she specialized in a Preventive Dental Hygiene Practice as a Periodontal Co-Therapist.  Carol’s expertize was in Oral Systemic Link with the use Phase Contrast Microscope.

 

 

Abstract:

How many people do we see, on a daily basis, in the dental office with gums like this?  The gums may appear to look healthy but as soon as you touch the gums they start to bleed.

Does this look healthy?

If any other part of your body bled like this when you touched it would you put a bandage on it and then see your Doctor 3 months later?  Of course not. When did this become an acceptable form of treatment for our patients? Yet we do it every day to the majority of our patients.  The patient arrives to see the Registered Dental Hygienist, R.D.H.  During the evaluation of oral cavity the gums start bleeding.  Discussions arise about the bleeding gums.  Talks about home care tools, regime and maybe changes to their diet.  Then the R.D.H. will proceed to clean the patient’s teeth for them.  Another discussion, “When should the next appointment should be”?  “Well now because of the condition of your mouth today, your bleeding gums, you should return in 3 months instead of your regular 6 month appointment. “Is that not putting on a bandage on the bleeding gum problem?  Why are we waiting 3 months to see what changes have occurred?

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Leonardo Faverani and Roberta Okamoto photo
Biography:

Leonardo Faverani has completed his PhD in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in 2013 and currently he is pursuing his Post-doctoral in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Implantology from Sao Paulo State Univsersity-UNESP Aracatuba Dental School. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals.

Roberta Okamoto is an Associate Professor of Anatomy and she is the Post-graduate Coordinator at Sao Paulo State Univsersity -UNESP Aracatuba Dental School. She has more than 67 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Osteoporosis is one of the systemic changes that is of worldwide public health concern, characterized by a decreased bone mass and a deterioration of bone microstructure. Several drugs has been used to osteoporosis treatment with the main goal to increase the bone mineral density and decrease the bone fractures. In dentistry, one of the determining factors for the proper dental implants osseointegration is the quality of bone tissue which is impaired in this situation. Therefore, we aim in this presentation to show the behavior of alveolar bone and peri-implantar bone affected by osteoporosis and its treatment through in vivo studies. In the begining, we will show the alveolar bone in homeostasis situation and then we will discuss some of our studies about alveolar and peri-implantar bone healing in osteoporatic rats treated with different drugs such as estrogen replacement, biphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators and other current medications indicated to treatment of female and male osteoporosis. Our results will be presented through histology, histometric, immunohistochemistry, microtomographic, fluorochromes and molecular analysis, leading to clinical responses. 

Keynote Forum

Garry Kolafa

University of Miami, US

Keynote: A new approach for handling flares gas
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Garry Kolafa photo
Biography:

Garry N Kolafa is has completed his Graduation from University of Miami. After that he directly entered the Oil and Gas Industry and worked in standard operations in wireline logging and exploration surveys worldwide. He became the technical and sales manager of a small but highly active geophysical supply and service company (WDS, Western Data Systems) based in Munich and Houston, and helped break the ice with Eastern Europe.

 

Abstract:

The practice of ‘flaring gas’ at many oil and gas production sites is a safety measure, which protects against the dangers of over-pressuring the wells or industrial equipment. When petroleum crude oil is extracted and produced, raw natural gas associated with the oil is brought to the surface. This natural associated gas is often vented or flared as waste or unusable gas, especially in areas lacking infrastructure. As we have become more aware of the necessity to strive to work cleaner, more efficiently, and with minimal environmental impact, it makes perfect sense to devise systems which are capable of making use of this gas that would otherwise be wasted and have negative influences on our environment. In this presentation, a new approach to handling flare gas is given where the benefits over conventional designs are discussed to improve and manage environmental sustainability.

 

Keynote Forum

Rajesh Sunasee

State University of New York at Plattsburgh, USA

Keynote: Design of cellulose nanocrystals-based functional biomaterials for innovative applications
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rajesh Sunasee photo
Biography:

Rajesh Sunasee completed his PhD in Organic Chemistry in 2009 from the University of Alberta in Canada and was the recipient of an NSERC-IRDF Industrial Postdoctoral Scholarship at Omegachem Inc., Quebec, Canada. He is currently an Associate Professor of Chemistry at SUNY Plattsburgh. His research focuses on surface modifications of cellulose nanocrystals for potential biomedical applications and has published 20 peer-reviewed papers, 3 book chapters, and 1 encyclopedia chapter. He was recently the recipient of SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. He continues to serve as an Alternate Councilor for the Northern New York American Chemical Society local chapter.

Abstract:

Research on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) continues to garner a high level of attention in both academia and industrial sectors due to their unique physicochemical properties. Their large surface area, excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, renewability, biodegradability and the presence of ample hydroxyl groups for surface chemical modifications have rendered them as attractive bionanomaterials for a number of innovative applications. CNCs can be easily derived via the acidic hydrolysis of native cellulose, the latter being the world most ubiquitous and abundant biopolymers. Depending on the source and extraction procedures, the resulting rod-like CNCs possess a nanoscale dimensions ranging from 50 to 3000nm in length with the cross-sections of 3-20nm. This talk will highlight the use of CNCs in various applications with the main focus on surface chemical modifications of CNCs. Surface chemical modifications of CNCs is an important process as it needs to be done in a such a way it does not affect the morphology and structural integrity of CNCs. Different fabrication strategies will be discussed for the design of CNC-based functional advanced biomaterials.

Keynote Forum

Baris Cankaya,

Marmara University Pendik Training Hospital, Turkey

Keynote: Perioperative renal injury: Is fluid management the only determinant ?
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Baris Cankaya,  photo
Biography:

Baris Canaya is an Anesthesiologist at Marmara University Pendik Training Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. He has deep interest for resuscitation, acute critical illness, trauma anesthesia, pediatric congenital cardiovascular anesthesia and perioperative patient safety. 

Abstract:

Perioperative fluid therapy management is a very difficult process. Perioperative morbidity is associated with the amount of intravenous fluid delivered and consequent postoperative complications. Not only fluid, its component and hemodynamic parameters also play important role. Studies have shown that combining fluid therapy with the goal of hemodynamic stabilization can minimize postoperative complications. Perioperative hypovolemia leads to organ dysfunction, since adaptive mechanisms cause peripheral vasoconstriction to maintain blood flow to the vital organs. Anesthetized patients often present with a functional intravascular volume deficit depending on many factors. Fluid management is a key topic for achieving advanced recovery after surgery. It is important to plan a tailor-cut fluid resuscitation for the patient perioperatively avoiding postoperative complications.
 

Keynote Forum

Clay J Cockerell

Cockerell Dermatopathology, USA

Keynote: What’s new in diagnostic dermatology and dermatopathology
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Clay J Cockerell photo
Biography:

Clay J Cockerell is a Clinical Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Director of the Division of Dermatopathology. He is the President and Owner of Cockerell Dermatopathology and the past Medical Director of Cockerell and Associates Dermatopathology as well as a Diplomat of the American Academy of Dermatology and American Board of Dermatopathology. He is internationally recognized for his contributions to both dermatology and dermatopathology. He is the Past President of the American Academy of Dermatology. For many years, he has overseen an educational program designed to train the next generation of dermatopathologists. He has served as an Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and is on the Editorial Boards of a number of medical journals including the American Journal of Dermatopathology.

Abstract:

Objectives: become aware of new techniques available to assist in diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma\r\n\r\nIn this lecture, a number of new cutaneous disorders recently described will be presented as well as information about new molecular techniques that have been recently developed that are now beginning to be introduced into dermatopathology and dermatology practice.\r\n\r\n

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elsayed Abdel-Sattar El-Meleigy photo
Biography:

Elsayed El-Meleigy is Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University and president of General Syndicate of Scientific Professionals in Egypt. He obtained his PhD in 1989, Ain Shams University, and spent postdoctoral sabbaticals in Purdue University, USA (2000). He has a Bachelor in Shariaa Law, Al-Azhar University (2004). He is a member of the Supreme Council of Universities and Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University. He authored numerous cultural and scientific books in plant physiology. Professor El-Meleigy supervised many PhD and MSc Thesis and examined many others. He is a member of many scientific organizations and participated in numerous conferences and scientific events at national, regional and international levels. He offered hundreds of public lectures, carried out many projects and activities for the community. He attended specialized courses in Egypt, America, and Germany, and took consultancies in the fields of plastics, paints, inks, adhesives, dry-ink pens and detergents.

Abstract:

Oil-mining companies have to subject waste water to expensive treatment before it can be discharged on land or at sea to comply with environment regulations. This study aims at developing an economically valid and applied comprehensive solution that takes advantage of oil-contaminated brackish salty water disposed by the General Petroleum Company in Egypt, maximizes its economic value and ensures its safe use in the environment. Three fields in RasSidr site of the company were inspected. Two main common plant species to RasSidr, Tamarix niloteca tree and Phragmites australis grass, that are tolerant to salinity along with Pongamia pinnata tree that is a leguminous and suitable for the RasSidr environment and grow close to saline-tiled beaches were used. These plants together with their associated bacteria of endophytes and rhizosphere that utilize crude oil as a carbon and energy source was considered a useful combination of bioremediation agents. Initially, soil characteristics were determined by analyzing soil samples taken at depths of 25 cm and 50 cm, and bacterial content of soil around the roots and within plant tissues was examined. Discharged water (@50 m3day-1) was used in irrigating plant fields in amounts sufficient to plant needs only. Growth parameters of plants were assessed four times in an interval of two months. Preliminary results indicated that growth rates in plant length, number of branches and stem girth, and chlorophyll content of oil-polluted water-irrigated plants of the two plant species were not significantly different (p≤0.05) from plants irrigated with fresh water. The number of bacteria in the soil increased significantly (p≥0.05) over time, and the color of residual oil in the soil was fading, indicating its decomposition. Soil under Tamarix niloteca contained similar quantities of microorganisms in both coastal saline-alkali soil and inland arid region indicating that colonization of the plant provided stable growth conditions for microorganisms. These plants and endophytes and rhizosphere combination played the main rule in the in-situ bioremediation process, and were efficient in removing around 70 % of the initial traces of crude oil within two months. They also provide safe environment and promote plant growth. They were able to decompose hydrocarbons and residues of crude oil as they possess special physiological mechanisms (PGPR) turns polluted water to safe water for human and environmental, and meanwhile achieving the objectives of this work. These results indicated that Tamarix niloteca and Phragmites australis are promising agents for treating oil-polluted salty wastewater in other fields of crude oil mining.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ergi Sener photo
Biography:

Ergi Sener, who is indicated as one of the 20 Turkish people to be followed in the field of technology, received a BS in Microelectronics Engineering in 2005 and double MS in Telecommunications & Management in 2007 from Sabanci University. He is pursuing a PHD degree in Technology Management & Innovation. He began his career as the co-founder and business development director of New Tone Technology Solutions in 2007 with the partnership of Sabancı University's Venture Program. Between 2009 and 2013, he worked as a CRM specialist at Garanti Payment Systems. In 2013, he joined MasterCard as a business development and innovation manager. He was also one of the co-founders and the managing director of Metamorfoz ICT, a new generation Fintech company and Bonbon Tech, the leader IoT focused new generation analytics company. He is currently acting as the Executive Board Member & CDO of a Dutch-based incubation center IdeaFiedl BV. During his career, along with many others he received “Global Telecoms Business Innovation Award" in 2014, "MasterCard Europe President's Award for Innovation" in 2013, "Payment System of the Year Award" by Payment Systems Magazine in 2012, and "Best Mobile Transaction Solution Award" by SIMagine in 2011.

Abstract:

In recent years, the increasing importance of "big data" has also led to "big" expectations. Particularly with the introduction of the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT), each object is linked to the internet and with the continuous increase in mobile and digital applications and services, data has been gathered at a surprising rate from various sources. When used and evaluated correctly, data has become a crucial competitive weapon, so in the technology world, data is frequently expressed as "new gold” or “new oil”. However, data does not represent a value by itself; "value" is formed as a result of processing data to solve a unique problem or fulfill a need. BonAir makes sense of big data by analyzing the data collected from customer visits, customer behaviors and customer profiles and uncovers the potential of big data and lead to provide competitive advantages for clients. With its unique technology, BonAir aims to perform the real-time behavior-based analysis. Based on their needs, customers can be directed at the right time to the right location with an ‘optional’ app integration as well. BonAir platform is being improved with the use of more advanced technology and better customer use cases. At the heart of the new platform lies the new hardware, which is recognized as an all-in-one device, that contains wi-fi sensors, beacon and several other sensor capabilities (such as heat, motion, pressure, etc) as well as camera integration. The camera will be used to count visitors with the best accuracy. Wi-fi sensors will provide all BonAir v1.0 capabilities including real-time heat maps, trend analysis, duration information, visit history, frequency and branch comparisons. Beacons will be used to send personalized notifications on iOS platform and in-door navigation use cases. Last, but not least, other sensors will be used to understand the effect of several factors and create predictive analytics. By getting insights into each different technology, BonAir + will be a major tool to be used in management decisions and business analytics. BonAir solution is currently the widest wi-fi based analytics network in several countries with more than 5.000 sensors deployed in the field. Some of the clients include Benetton, BMW, Volvo, Mercedes, Turkcell, Turk Telekom etc.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andreas Engelbrecht photo
Biography:

Prof. Andreas Engelbrecht is the head of Emergency medicine at the University of Pretoria / Steve Biko Academic Hospital. He completed the MBChB degree at the age of 24 years from University of Pretoria. His other qualifications include FCEM, MMed (Fam Med), Dip PEC, DA, DTM&H and MMed in Pharmacology. He is the director of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pretoria. He has published more than 13 papers in reputed journals and chapters in emergency medicine textbooks. He developed the VAPP course (venomous animals poisonous plants) and the Pearls and Pitfalls in Emergency Medicine.

Abstract:

Background: Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) are frequently used in South-Africa due to their availability and low costs. These drugs are highly toxic in overdose. The aim of the study was to audit key aspects in the management of patients with TCA overdose against an international benchmark.\r\nMethods: A cross sectional descriptive audit of clinical records was done. The findings were measured against the Guidelines for medical therapy of the Emergency network (GEM net).\r\nResults: Thirty-two clinical records were recruited and audited. The following findings were made:\r\nThe vital signs of 30 (93, 7%) patient’s were recorded, 21(70%) were abnormal. One case with hypotension was not managed appropriately. Eighteen (56%) patients had their blood pH analyzed. Six were abnormal. None of these were managed appropriately. Thirty (93, 7%) EKG assessments were done. Only 17(56.6%) were recorded. Five (29%) printouts could be found within the files. Of these 4(80%) had an abnormal tracing but had not been treated. Of those EKGs only documented, 3(25%) were described as abnormal but were managed inappropriately. Treatment with Bicarbonate was either omitted or done inappropriately and without monitoring. The Level of consciousness of 31 (96%) patients was recorded. Three who required intubation were not intubated.\r\nConclusion:\r\nThe management of TCA overdose did not meet the standards prescribed by GEM net in our sample. This Audit had a number of limitations but was used to improve the management of this condition in our Unit and may be useful to others.

Keynote Forum

Dennis M Lox

Sports & Regenerative Medicine Centers, Florida

Keynote: Scaffolds and stem cells: A tissue engineering approach
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dennis M Lox photo
Biography:

Dennis M Lox is a world renowned Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell expert. He has lectured internationally with some of the most acclaimed Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell researchers in the world. He has a special interest in Regenerative and Stem Cell Medicine relating to athletes, osteoarthritis in athletes and the aging population, and avascular necrosis. He has edited two medical textbooks, written eight medical textbook chapters, and authored numerous scientific publications and abstracts. He maintains an active Regenerative Medicine practice in Beverly Hills, California and the Tampa Bay, Florida area. He has treated patients from around the globe at his offices, ranging from elite professional athletes, to patients in their teens to over age 90. Utilizing his vast experience he maintains an individualized approach to each patient.

Abstract:

Regenerative Medicine has found traction in numerous medical specialties, including orthopedic and rheumatologic conditions. Clinical studies have utilized various stem cell sources both allogenic and autologous. Tissue engineering strategies with long routes in wound repair models with a variety of scaffolding materials have been applied to the orthopedic model, most frequently the knee. Scaffolds incorporating stem cell medicine have also been studied and used. The most frequent ailment afflicting the knee is degenerative osteoarthritis. Traditional medical models do not alter the progression of this disorder. It is through investigation of Regenerative and Tissue Engineering strategies, that halting or reversing the progressive nature of degenerative osteoarthritis hope remains. A thorough understanding of the complex nature of degenerative osteoarthritis as a multi-factorial disorder, occurring not only as a result of repetitive stress, joint overload, but also as a function of local cytokine signaling. These signaling processes result in catabolism exceeding reparative processes. These cytokine signaling mechanisms are familiar in the Rheumatologic arena, but have not received widespread attention in mainstream medicine. Stem cells and some scaffolds exert a positive reparative or anabolism to counter the degradation of catabolic inflammatory cytokines. The utilization of scaffolds and stem cells merge Regenerative and Tissue Engineering technologies, where the future may include this as a Preventative Medicine Strategy as well.

Keynote Forum

Mr.Ronald Naumann

Head of the Transgenic Core Facility, MPI of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden/Germany

Keynote: Generating a mouse-rat chimeric brain by murine GFP-ES
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mr.Ronald Naumann photo
Biography:

Ronald Naumann has completed his academic degree in 1994 at Wernigerode/Germany. He was starting practical experience in procedures necessary to generate transgenic mice by blastocyst injection, in colony management of transgenic animals. Ronald has been the Head of the Transgenic Core Facility (TCF) since 2002. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and gave several practical workshops in meetings and conferences.

 

Abstract:

The Transgenic Core Facility at the MPI-CBG provides a centralized resource and state-of-the-art technology in production of Knock-Out mice by injection or aggregation of embryonic stem cells into mouse embryos, and transgenic mice by injection of DNA into the pronuclear of mouse oocytes. The Service provides in addition CRISPR methods into cells and mouse zygotes.

In the actual application it shown a pilot project to established a chimeric brain by injection of mouse ES-cells into a rat embryo.

All neurons generated during the development of the mammalian CNS derive from neuroepithelial (NE) cells. NE cells undergo three principal kinds of cell division, symmetric, proliferative divisions (two NE cells), asymmetric divisions (one NE cell, one neuron) and symmetric, differentiating divisions (two neurons). The rat neurogenesis is very close to human brain development.

Because the neurogenesis works different between rat and mice – we generate a chimeric model which shows both specific neuro development in only one tissue.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hischam Bassiouni  photo
Biography:

Hischam Bassiouni is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery. He is the Director of two Neurosurgical Clinics at two major academic teaching hospitals, (Klinikum Amberg and Klinikum Weiden) in Bavaria, Germany. He is also the Member of German Neurosurgical Society, European Neurosurgical Society, and German Skull Base Society. He had his Neurosurgical training at University Hospital Aachen and University Hospital Essen, Germany. His neurosurgical and scientific sub-specializations include neuro-oncology, neurovascular surgery, skull base surgery, and neuro-pediatric surgery. He is the first author of 13 publications in high-ranked Neurosurgical journals and has authored several chapters in international neurosurgical reference books.
 

Abstract:

In recent years several major technical advances, particularly in the treatment of brain and spinal tumors, vascular malformations and skull base surgery, have been introduced into neurosurgery. These include refinements in microsurgical techniques, microscopic fluorescent techniques (e.g. 5-ALA, ICG-angiography, etc.) for maximal safe resection of intrinsic brain tumors and treatment of aneurysms and AVMs, introduction of neuroendoscopy and routine usage of intra-operative neuromonitoring in appropriate cases. We present these latest technical advances in the field of neurooncology, for the resection of skull base lesions and for the treatment of vascular malformations demonstrating their impact on preserving neurological integrity with resultant preservation of patient’s life quality after micro neurosurgical resection of tumors (e.g. Glioma, meningioma, neurinoma/schwannomas, etc.) treatment of vascular malformations (aneurysm, AVM, cavernoma) and treatment of skull base lesions. Appropriate selection and application of these new techniques under discussion in neurosurgery has resulted in a better outcome after microsurgical treatment of brain and spinal tumors, vascular malformations and skull base lesions. This includes more radical and safer tumor resection with avoidance of new neurological deficits and with preservation of patient’s neurological integrity, prolonged life expectancy in malignant brain tumors and preservation of patient’s life quality after surgery.
 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Thomas Landry photo
Biography:

Thomas Landry is a Senior Marine Research Biologist with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and an Adjunct Professor at the Atlantic Veterinary College, with over 30 years of research experience and 60 publications. His work is primarily focused on the optimization of bivalve production within a healthy ecosystem for purposes of sustainable harvesting. Thomas has served as a member of the ICES Working Group on "The Interaction of Mariculture with the Environment" for the past 8 years. His present research is focused on shellfish aquaculture, aquatic invasive species, bivalve physiology and genetics, and investigations on the interactions between bivalves and the environment. He serves on various professional committees and working groups concerned with the development of shellfish aquaculture in Canada. He co-chaired and participated in the organizing committees of several international and national conferences.

Abstract:

Shellfish aquaculture in Prince Edward Island (PEI) has been impacted with the arrival of four invasive tunicates over the past two decades. Treatment methods have been developed to minimize the impact of these infestations on the shellfish aquaculture industry, with some consideration on associated ecosystems. Tunicates are important fouling organisms that compete with mussels, oysters and associated fauna for space and food. Untreated infestations have led to reduced growth rates and meat yields of farmed shellfish and significant loss in productivity due to fall-off of mussels. The main impact, however, is food depletion and bio-deposition which could lead to some disruption in the ecological function of infested estuaries. Science has played an important role in providing key knowledge and advice to identify management options, particularly relevant to environmental consideration. This knowledge now plays a key consideration in the expansion of the shellfish aquaculture in
PEI and other areas affected by tunicate infestation.

Break: 11:05-11:20
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hischam Bassiouni  photo
Biography:

Hischam Bassiouni is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery. He is the Director of two Neurosurgical Clinics at two major academic teaching hospitals, (Klinikum Amberg and Klinikum Weiden) in Bavaria, Germany. He is also the Member of German Neurosurgical Society, European Neurosurgical Society, and German Skull Base Society. He had his Neurosurgical training at University Hospital Aachen and University Hospital Essen, Germany. His neurosurgical and scientific sub-specializations include neuro-oncology, neurovascular surgery, skull base surgery, and neuro-pediatric surgery. He is the first author of 13 publications in high-ranked Neurosurgical journals and has authored several chapters in international neurosurgical reference books.
 

Abstract:

In recent years several major technical advances, particularly in the treatment of brain and spinal tumors, vascular malformations and skull base surgery, have been introduced into neurosurgery. These include refinements in microsurgical techniques, microscopic fluorescent techniques (e.g. 5-ALA, ICG-angiography, etc.) for maximal safe resection of intrinsic brain tumors and treatment of aneurysms and AVMs, introduction of neuroendoscopy and routine usage of intra-operative neuromonitoring in appropriate cases. We present these latest technical advances in the field of neurooncology, for the resection of skull base lesions and for the treatment of vascular malformations demonstrating their impact on preserving neurological integrity with resultant preservation of patient’s life quality after micro neurosurgical resection of tumors (e.g. Glioma, meningioma, neurinoma/schwannomas, etc.) treatment of vascular malformations (aneurysm, AVM, cavernoma) and treatment of skull base lesions. Appropriate selection and application of these new techniques under discussion in neurosurgery has resulted in a better outcome after microsurgical treatment of brain and spinal tumors, vascular malformations and skull base lesions. This includes more radical and safer tumor resection with avoidance of new neurological deficits and with preservation of patient’s neurological integrity, prolonged life expectancy in malignant brain tumors and preservation of patient’s life quality after surgery.
 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker David J Bearss photo
Biography:

David J Bearss, PhD, brings a consistent and successful track record of drug discovery and development that spans the last 17 years in both academic and industrial settings. He is an expert in small-molecule drug development and in the use of genetic model systems in drug discovery and has deep experience in translational research focused on drug development and the use of genetic markers to predict drug sensitivity. He served as Chief Scientific Officer at SuperGen overseeing early drug discovery and development and subsequently as Co-Director of the Center for Investigational Therapeutics at the Huntsman Cancer Institute, Associate Professor in the Department of Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah and Associate Professor of Physiology & Developmental Biology at
Brigham Young University. He has published more than 70 manuscripts and book chapters, has over 30 patents issued or pending and has won several awards for his scientific achievements.

Abstract:

Multiple phase I/II studies have shown alvocidib to be highly effective in both frontline and relapsed/refractory AML when sequentially administered before cytarabine and mitoxantrone (ACM). In frontline patients, ACM resulted in a complete remission (CR) rate of 70% versus 46% CR with ara-C and daunorubicin (7+3). The clinical activity of alvocidib in AML is significantly correlated with inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-9 (CDK9) and disruption CDK-9 mediated transcription. The MCL1 gene is regulated by CDK-9 transcriptional control and its expression is tightly regulated by alvocidib. Studies with AML cell lines to model the sequential treatment of the ACM regimen have shown that MCL1 expression and apoptosis are tightly connected to treatment with alvocidib. To further investigate the correlation of MCL-1 mediated survival, mitochondrial profiling (BH3 priming) was conducted on 63 archived ACM-treated samples taken directly from patients bone marrow or circulating blasts. Analysis of the BH3 priming states in AML clinical samples revealed NOXA priming was significantly higher in CR bone marrow samples (44.5% primed) compared with samples from non-responders (NR) (5.2%
primed) (p=0.006). NOXA is known to interact directly with MCL1, suggesting that the AML samples that are most responsive to ACM treatment may have a high survival dependence on MCL1. The correlation between NOXA and ACM response is distinct from priming states predicting response to other ara-C regimens in samples from AML patients. This work reveals a potential biomarker for identification of patients likely to respond to ACM and this biomarker is currently being prospectively tested in a phase II clinical trial

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bakhos A Tannous photo
Biography:

Bakhos A Tannous is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Director for the Interdepartmental Neuroscience Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a member of the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and also acts as Co-Director of the Molecular Neurogenetics Unit-East. His research interest includes novel imaging, high throughput discovery of gene/cell/drug therapies for brain tumors, with a primary focus on glioma stem cells, as well as detection of tumor-specific biomarkers in blood. He has published >90 papers and serves as an Editorial Board Member of several journals.

Abstract:

 

Glioblastomas (GBMs) comprises >50% of all primary brain tumors and are the most malignant type with a 5-year survival rate of only 3.3%, despite standard-of-care (surgery, radiation and temozolomide). Recently it has been shown that the glioma stem-like cells (GSCs; or tumor initiating cells) sub-population of the tumor are largely responsive for tumor resistance, recurrence and patient death, thus providing a clinically-relevant model to study GBM. GBMs are highly heterogeneous and there is a complex interaction among different subtypes of tumor cells and stromal cells associated with the tumor which can modify the tumor itself as well as its microenvironment to promote tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and immune suppression. The transcriptome profiles of GBMs has identified four major subtypes, two of which, proneural (PN) and mesenchymal (MES), predominate with multiple subtypes residing in the same tumor. GBM with enriched MES properties typically display a more aggressive phenotype both in vitro and in vivo with pronounced radio/chemo resistance. Our goal is to understand GBM progression and therapeutic resistance to help us develop novel diagnostics/therapeutics aiming at eradicating this cancer type. Over the last several years, we have developed novel efficient gene/drug/cell therapeutic strategies that bypass the blood-brain barrier to target and eradicate patient-derived GBM stem cells model.

Keynote Forum

Laura Mylott

Bouve College Northeastern University, USA

Keynote: Impact of online peer discussion on leadership development in graduate nurses
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Laura Mylott photo
Biography:

Laura Mylott is Clinical Professor at the School of Nursing, in the Bouve College of Health Care Science, Northeastern University and Program Director for the Graduate Nursing Administration and Leadership program since 2013 and the newly developed Nursing Informatics Graduate Certificate. Laura received her BSN from Salve Regina University, an MSN from Yale University and a PhD from Boston College. After serving in executive, program-based and advanced practice clinical nursing leadership roles in acute and critical care for 25 plus years, Laura brought her experience in leadership, outcomes-driven practice and acute healthcare service delivery to the classroom. Laura’s research interests include leadership development using innovative teaching strategies and role transition. Laura is a member of the American Nurses Association, American Association of Nurse Executives, the Organization of Nurse Leaders and the National Honor Society, Gamma Epsilon Chapter.

Abstract:

Graduate nursing students must develop their professional leadership capacity. There is growing evidence that leadership development should extend beyond teaching traditional knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA), and target the growth of leadership efficacy and identity. Structured, reflective peer discussions about past leadership experiences may enhance insight, develop confidence and re-frame assumptions about oneself and one’s capacity to lead. Reflecting on one’s leadership experience is critical for developing self-efficacy and leadership identity. Experience-based nursing peer discussions offer the benefit of peer feedback and require the ongoing engagement of the participants. This pilot study aimed to assess the impact of the educational intervention “Looking for Leadership”, a semi-structured web-based, peer discussion activity about first-person leadership experiences on self-reported levels of leadership self-efficacy. Forty-three students participated in a two group; pretest-posttest evaluation and leadership self-efficacy were measured using the 22 items Leadership Self Efficacy Questionnaire developed by Hannah and colleagues. Students in the intervention group (n=27) reported higher levels of Total Leader Self-Efficacy and significantly higher Leader Means Efficacy (p=.010). Leader means efficacy is the extent to which leaders believe that they can rely on others in their work environment to enhance their effectiveness as a leader. The use of structured, reflective peer discussion was effective in developing leadership capacity. Additional research is needed regarding the effectiveness of this approach using larger samples. 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter J F Henderson photo
Biography:

Peter J F Henderson is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the University of Leeds. He obtained his BSc in 1965 and PhD in 1968, both in Biochemistry, at the University of Bristol. After Postdoctoral training at the Enzyme Institute, Madison, University of Wisconsin and in the Department of Biochemistry at Leicester, he became a University Lecturer in 1973. In 1975 he moved to the Department of Biochemistry at Cambridge, where he became Reader in Molecular Biology of Membranes in 1990. He has held Visiting Professorships in Japan, Canada and Australia. He was Scientific Director of the European Membrane Protein (EMeP) consortium 2003-2008, Coordinator of the European Drug Initiative for Channels and Transporters (EDICT) 2008-2012 and held Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Research Fellowships in 2001-2002 and 2014-2017. He has published over 200 scientific papers in the fields of Membrane Transport, Enzyme Kinetics and Structural Biology.

Abstract:

The Mhp1 Na+-hydantoin membrane symport protein from Microbacterium liquefaciens is a paradigm for the nucleobase-cation-symport, NCS-1, family of transport proteins found widely in archaebacteria, bacteria, yeasts and plants. Their metabolic roles include the capture by cells of nitrogen compounds and vitamins from the environment. Mhp1 is also a structural model for the huge range of ‘5-helix-inverted-repeat’ superfamily of proteins, because, unusually, crystal structures are available for its open-outwards, occluded, and open-inward conformations. Here we accomplish a detailed dynamic model of the partial reactions in an alternating access cycle of membrane transport derived from substrate binding studies to the purified Mhp1 protein by combining novel mass spectrometry, stopped-flow and steady state kinetic analyses and mutagenesis. The mechanism of coupling substrate transport to the Na+-gradient is revealed during a sequence of mostly reversible kinetic steps that explain how transfer of substrate across the membrane is affected by changes in conformational states. The AceI H+/substrate antiport protein from Acinetobacter baumannii is a paradigm for the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of drug efflux proteins found dispersed throughout the Proteobacteria. AceI contributes to the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii towards the widely used antiseptic, chlorhexidine. Currently there is little structural information about the PACE family of transport proteins, but progress towards understanding the recognition of substrates and cations by AceI and its homologues will be discussed.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sergey Suchkov photo
Biography:

Sergey Suchkov graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and awarded with MD, then in 1985 maintained his PhD at the I M Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and in 2001, maintained his Doctorship Degree at the Nat Inst of Immunology, Russia. From 1987 through 1989, he was a senior Researcher, Koltzov Inst of Developmental Biology. From 1989 through 1995, he was a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology, Helmholtz Eye Research Institute in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004, he was a Chair of the Dept. for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute. He has been trained at: NIH; Wills Eye Hospital, PA, USA; Univ. of Florida in Gainesville; UCSF, S-F, CA, USA; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. He was an Exe Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. At present, he is a Chair, Dept. for Personalized and Translational Medicine, I M Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, USA; American Chemical Society (ACS), USA; American Heart Association (AHA), USA; EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine), Brussels, EU; ARVO (American Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology); ISER (International Society for Eye Research); PMC (Personalized Medicine Coalition), Washington, USA.

Abstract:

Catalytic Abs (catAbs) are multivalent immunoglobulins (Igs) with a capacity to hydrolyze the antigenic (Ag) substrate. In this sense, proteolytic Abs (Ab-proteases) represents Abs to provide proteolytic effects. Abs against myelin basic protein/MBP with proteolytic activity exhibiting sequence-specific cleavage of MBP is of great value to monitor demyelination whilst in multiple sclerosis. The activity of Ab-proteases was first registered at the subclinical stages, 1-2 years prior to the clinical illness and the activity of the Ab-proteases revealed significant correlation with scales of demyelination and the disability of the patients as well. So, the activity of Ab-proteases and its dynamics tested would confirm a high subclinical and predictive (translational) value of the tools as applicable for personalized monitoring protocols. Ab-proteases directly affecting remodeling of tissues with multilevel architectonics (for instance, myelin) are of tremendous value. By changing sequence specificity one may reach reduction of a density of the negative proteolytic effects within the myelin sheath and thus minimizing scales of demyelination. Ab-proteases can be programmed and re-programmed to suit the needs of the body metabolism or could be designed for the development of new catalysts with no natural counterparts. Further studies are needed to secure artificial or edited Ab-proteases as translational tools of the newest generation to diagnose, to monitor, to control and to treat and rehabilitate multiple sclerosis patients at clinical stages and to prevent the disorder at subclinical stages in persons at risks.

References:

  1. Gabibov A A, Paltsev M A and Suchkov S V (2011) Antibody-associated proteolysis in surveillance of autoimmune demyelination: clinical and preclinical issues. Future Neurology 6(3):303-305.
  2. D Kostyushev, I Tsarev, D Gnatenko, M Paltsev and S Suchkov (2011) Myelin-associated serological targets as applicable to diagnostic tools to be used at the preclinical and transient stages of multiple sclerosis progression. Open J Immunology 1(3):80-86.
  3. Gabibov A G, Ponomarenko N A, Tretyak E B, Paltsev M A and Suchkov S V (2006) Catalytic autoantibodies in clinical autoimmunity and modern medicine. Autoimmunity Reviews 2006(5):324-330.
  4. Ponomarenko N A, Durova O M, Vorobiev I I, Belogurov A A, Telegin G B, et al. (2005) Catalytic activity of autoantibodies toward myelin basic protein correlates with the scores on the multiple sclerosis expanded disability status scale. Immunol. Lett. 103(1):45-50.
  5. Ponomarenko N A, Durova O M, Vorobiev I I, Aleksandrova E S, Telegin G B, et al. (2002) Catalytic antibodies in clinical and experimental pathology: human and mouse models. Journal of Immunological Methods 2002(269):197-211.

Keynote Forum

Yakir Aharonov

Chapman University, USA

Keynote: A new approach to quantum mechanics
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yakir Aharonov photo
Biography:

Yakir Aharonov, Ph.D., is professor of theoretical physics at Chapman University, where he holds the James J. Farley Professorship in Natural Philosophy. Considered
one of the most highly regarded scientists in the world, Dr. Aharonov received the prestigious Wolf Prize in 1998 for his co-discovery of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect, one of
the cornerstones of modern physics. He is also recipient of the 2009 President's National Medal of Science, "for his contributions to the foundations of quantum physics
and for drawing out unexpected implications of that field ranging from the Aharonov-Bohm effect to the theory of weak measurement." He is one of the authors to the book
"Quantum Paradoxes" along with Dr. Daniel Rohrlich, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. The book is a pioneering work on the remaining mysteries of quantum
mechanics.

Abstract:

I discuss in my talk the reformulation of quantum mechanics in which each quantum system, at any time is described by two
Hilbert space vectors rather than one. One of the vectors propagates from past boundary condition towards the present and
the other propagates back to the present from a future boundary condition. I will show that this reformulation uncovers a host
of fascinating new phenomena, some of which will be described in detail within this talk. Finally, I will show that this new
reformulation suggests a novel solution to the notorious problem of the Quantum Measurement.

Keynote Forum

Krzysztof Cudzik

Ostrowieckie Medical Center Of Civil Company, Poland

Keynote: Every Breath Counts: Halt the rise of COPD, Prevention of COPD in Poland
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Krzysztof Cudzik photo
Biography:

Krzysztof Cudzik is a Medical doctor, graduate from Warsaw Medical University, Poland in 2017. In 2018 he started his residency in internal medicine on Cardiology. Ward in District Hospital in Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski.

Abstract:

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses and very important social problem. It is the third leading cause of death among chronic diseases worldwide causing 3,1mln deaths a year globally. About 250mln patients suff er from COPD all over the world. In Poland statistics stay that about 2mln people are diagnosed with COPD and it is 10% of screened population aft er 40 years old. On the other hand, it is estimated that the disease is diagnosed at an early stage in less than 20% of patients, and this is the reason why a signifi cant population of patients is not diagnosed or diagnosed only in the advanced stage of the disease. Regarding prevalence, direct costs of treatment COPD in
Poland are very high and estimated about 441,8mln PLN per year and include pharmacotherapy (297,1 mln PLN), general care and specialist appointments (31,6 mln PLN), hospitalization (96,1 mln PLN), rehabilitation (6,3 mln PLN), home oxygen therapy (6,3 mln PLN), nursing care (4,4 mln PLN). An important element in prevention is early smoking cessation, reduction of exposure to harmful factors and infl uenza vaccination. Limiting these factors is benefi cial to the patient's health and reduces the risk of exacerbations. Patients should pay attention to normal body weight and a healthy diet. Early diagnosis of COPD is also very important. Emotional support and a psychological support are particularly important in patients with advanced COPD. Depression signifi cantly increases the risk of exacerbations and aff ects the quality of life of patients. Systematic use of drugs and respiratory rehabilitation increases respiratory effi ciency. Prevention of this disease is most important to reduce still growing prevalence and costs.

Keynote Forum

Wang Xuefei

Peking Union Medical College & Hospital, China

Keynote: Title: CTC immune escape mediated by PD-L1
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wang Xuefei photo
Biography:

Wang Xuefei is a Medicine Doctor graduated from PUMCH (Peking Union Medical College and Hospital). Currently, she is the fellow of the breast surgery department in PUMCH. She is also a member of Beijing Breast Disease Society of Young Academic. These years, her researches are focused on metastatic breast cancer, especially on CTC of breast cancer. She has also obtained the patent of CTC hemodialysis, meanwhile, participated in a number of national projects, including Beijing Municipal Science and Technology project, National 11th Five-Year issue, National 12th Five-Year issue. She has published more than 14 articles and books, including 4 SCI articles, and did oral and poster presentation in many breast cancer related conferences.

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in women around the world. CTC (circulating tumor cell) is associated with the breast cancer patients’ cancer-related deaths and prognosis. The recently circulating clusters were found and its metastasis and tumor formation ability is 23~50 times as CTC. However, its mechanism has not been clarified. These days, researchers have successfully completed CTC cluster separation, CTC cell culture, and PD-L1 was found to be related with histological grading of tumor. Meanwhile, the high expression of PD-L1 in CTC surface has also been reported. Since PDL1 can mediate Treg to play the role of immunosuppression, we propose that CTC with positive PD-L1 is easier to connect PD-L1, immune cells and CK cytokines etc. Treg cells can protect CTC from being attacked by the immune system through the immunosuppression. Meanwhile, they can weaken CTL killing ability and trigger more MDSC. Finally, CTC formed the metastasis. To explore this hypothesis we have analyzed CTC and PD-L1 mRNA expression on CTC in 10 metastatic breast cancer patients and 10 primary breast cancer patients. We have also analyzed the relationship between clinical pathological features and PD-L1 expression on CTC, through overall and split chi square test. The results show that in the total 20 patients, 15 have more than 1 CTC in 7.5 ml peripheral blood. Among the 15 patients, each one has at least 1 CTC showing PD-L1. We found PD-L1 on CTC is related to the tumor size (P=0.012) lymph node status (P=0.001) and PR status (P=0.037). In tumor size group, we can see statistical difference between T2 and T3 (P=0.003), while in node status group statistical difference can be found in N1 vs. N3 (P=0.000) and N2 vs. N3 (P=0.015). However, we didn’t see difference of PD-L1 on CTC in metastatic and non-metastatic patients (P=0.418). Next, we are preparing for the cell experiment to further discover it.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break @ Pre Function Area 11:20-11:40

Keynote Forum

Christopher Jump

Heart & Soul, Inc. USA

Keynote: Define your wellness: Disrupt your diagnosis
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christopher Jump photo
Biography:

Christopher Jump earned his peer Counseling Certificate from College of San Mateo in the spring of 2012. Since beginning his career at Heart and Soul, Inc. in the summer of 2012, he has tirelessly advocated for the rights of those experiencing mental health distress. Utilizing his own lived experience, he calls upon people to change the conversation from diagnosis to dialogue. He is the Program Manager at Heart and Soul, Inc. 7/2012 to present. Previously, he was a Panelist at Stamp Out Stigma 1/2012 to 4/2014 and a Resource Advocate at Vocational Rehabilitation Services 7/2010 to 5/2011.

 

Abstract:

Many people experience trauma and hardship in life. Many are diagnosed with mental health conditions. Is a diagnosis always necessary? If a person is diagnosed, is it always necessary to prescribe drugs? Are there alternatives? Is it possible for a person to learn to cope and move on in life without relying on a diagnosis and prescription medication? Trauma affects many people in many ways. It can be through physical or sexual abuse, natural disasters (earthquake, flood, hurricane, etc), kidnapping, rape, shootings, death, etc. 60% of adults in the US report experiencing abuse or some other form of family trauma during childhood. Four out of every 10 children say they have experienced a physical assault within the past year. One in 10 of those resulted in a physical related injury. In the speech, the author will plan on spending five minutes addressing the impact that physical and emotional abuse had on me as a child. The author wants to mention two specific incidents of verbal and emotional abuse. The author will touch on feeling extreme sadness as a result and how even as far back as third grade the author experienced intense thoughts of suicide ideation. The author will also touch on the interests the author had as a child and how the trauma led me to lose interest in the author’s normal activities. After explaining the impact trauma had on my life, the author will spend five minutes detailing what did not work for me when the author decided to seek treatment. The author will mention being misdiagnosed with clinical depression and borderline personality disorder. The author will touch on the 15 years the author spent on medication, a few specific examples of the trauma of being hospitalized and how lost the author was for 15 years. The author will then spend five minutes describing what worked for me. The author will explain how through two therapies, dialectic behavior therapy and cognitive behavior therapy and through the support of my peers the author was able to learn coping techniques and go off of my medications. The author will use specific examples from each therapy and how connecting with others with lived experience gave the author that sense of acceptance and community. The author will spend the final five minutes addressing what the author life is like now. The author will share about the work the author do as a Program Manager at Heart and amp; Soul. The author will share examples of success the author have had in the community. Specific examples such as isolated people becoming social, people with no direction deciding to go to school and seek a degree, people becoming gainfully employed. The author will use the final five to 10 minutes for questions and answers

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker SHOBHA AHI photo
Biography:

Dr Shobha Ahi is PhD in Biochemistry and serving as Senior Scientist and Quality Manager at National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL), Govt. of India. She has outstanding 14 years experience as an anti-doping scientist and teaching resource (faculty) for students of toxicology, forensic science, instrumentation and drug metabolism. Her research experience is in developing and applying the state-of-the-art approaches to identify and quantify and drugs and proteins in the biological samples. She is author of over 35 scientific publications, and conference proceedings in the field of drugs of abuse testing, analytical chemistry, sports medicine and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. 

Abstract:

Drug abuse in athletes is a menace which should be addressed by the sporting and the associated non-sporting fraternity for the benefit of the society. Doping is the use of prohibited substances and methods for the purpose of performance enhancement by athletes. Doping may lead to drug abuse and addiction when an athlete may get involved in it for getting the competitive edge or for stress relieving. Hence, it requires stringent actions to promote confidence of athletes in their natural ability while saying no to doping. The World Anti Doping Agency (WADA), monitors the anti doping program worldwide to promote fair play and to safeguard athletic population. However, the performance enhancing drugs pave their way into the sports and games and hampers its true spirit. The advancements in the classification of drugs of abuse makes it more challenging for the doping/substance abuse testing laboratories to keep a check on the cheaters which is achieved using improved testing methodologies and advanced scientific research. Drug abuse in athletes is a significant problem which may have many potential underlying causes. It requires to take necessary preventive measures, promote education, provide motivation and interventions to combat doping/drug abuse in sports. This presentation would provide a review of the history of doping and drugs of abuse in athletes, their side -effects, addictions, advancements in testing methodologies and scientific advancements. The future prospective required to curb the menace of doping/drugs abuse by adulterated nutritional supplements would also be discussed.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bernhard Mann photo
Biography:

Bernhard Mann has completed his MA (Social Science) in Erlangen-Nuernberg, his PhD (Social Gerontology) in Kassel and his MPH (Public Health) at the Medical University of Hannover. He was Adjunct Professor and Full Professor of Health and Social Management at Universities and Universities of Applied Sciences in Germany. His scientific interest is the psycho-social structure of the quality of life. He got international experiences in India, Japan, Mexico, Israel, Great Britain, France etc..especially in the context with basic education by Mahatma Gandhi.

Abstract:

The demographic chance of the human population is globally. The number of elderly is growing:Year 1988 – 416.000.000 are 60+. Year 2025 – 806.000.000 (72% in developing countries). Aswell as the life expectation of adult handicaps is increasing too. In FRG, 60+ seriously handicapped with 100 % by nearly 800 000. Familiy care for the handicaps could not be guaranteed. Parents are stressed, getting ill or come to the end of life. A system of care for the adult handicaps will be very important. They have to cope with cumulative problems such as physical, psychological and social straints. This phenomenon is known as multiple jeopardy. The question will be how to create a valuable life for an indivdual in order to improve the capabilities. Systems for care of the elderly cannot be transfered easily among countries, as the WHO approach is told. A scientific way about prevention and health promotion gives Armatya Sen (novel prize 1998) with the capability approach. It is defined by it´s choice of focus upon the significance of individual´s capability of achieving the kind of live they have reason to value. To make sure that there is an individual orientated intervention - as already suggested in the UN Charta - the following capabilities of health and social integration should to be considered: (1) a stabilization of the success in socialization and resilience, (2) a greater cooperation between medical, social and caring powers as elementary instruments of the development of organziation in inpatient and outpatient institutions and (3) a sensivity of generation-bounded experiences of ageing disabled. Mico-sociological there is to regard their specific competences achieved by many years of coping with their personal disabilities on a field of psycho-social capabilities. Important are agencies for the development of functioning and capabilites: (1) by building up a staff with physio-therapists, occupational-therapists and supervisors of staff-planing, (2) by building up healthy organizations and self-help-organizations and 3) by creating strong welfare institutions. Public health and health care will be very important.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jean Paul Lellouche photo
Biography:

Jean Paul Lellouche has completed his PhD degree in 1981 from University Claude Bernard/La Doua, Lyon, France. He then joined the Department of Chemistry/Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA) at Bar-Ilan University since October 2000 as Full Professor (Organic Chemis-try/Nano(bio)technology - July 2008) and as Chemistry Department Head (Oct 2017-June 2018). His main R&D activities includes R&D cutting-edge materials science level interfacing with nano(bio)technology. He has authored 154 papers. His main research interests focus on conductive polymers, sol-gel and polymeric surfaces/matrices/NPs, MRI and drug delivery/gene silencing, antibacterial/anti-parasitic nanomaterials and coatings, UV-photoreactive particles for surface nano(micro)structuration of polymeric coatings, catalytic particles (fuel cell technology), and transition metal dichalcogenide nanostructures.

 

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Ben Campbell

Distinguished Researcher, UK

Keynote: The Last tango of the Finite Graviton
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ben Campbell photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Dr. Hiroshi Ohno

RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Japan

Keynote: Impact of gut microbiota on autoimmune diseases
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Hiroshi Ohno photo
Biography:

Hiroshi Ohno has obtained M.D. from School of Medicine, Chiba University in 1983, and completed his PhD at the Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University in 1991. After postdoctoral studies at NIH, USA, he was appointed as a professor at the Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University in 1999, and fhas been a team leader at RIKEN since 2004. His research interest is host-gut microbiota interaction as well as intestinal immunology. He has published more than 150 original articles. He is now the president of the Japanese Society for Cell biology, and a board member of the Japanese Society for Immunology. 

Abstract:

Along with the westernization of the lifestyle, prevalence rate has been rapidly increasing for some
diseases, including autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). This is considered to be attributable to environmental factors. A major environmental factor is gut microbiota. Recent progress in the gut microbiota research, mainly with metagenomic analysis, dysbiosis, such as the loss of diversity in gut microbiota, is associated with many of these diseases. By employing germ-free/gnotobiotic mice models with transferring fecal microbiota from disease patients and model mice, disease-associated dysbiosis could reproduce symptoms. On the other hand, healthy fecal microbiota transplantation can cure refractory Clostridium dificile infection. Thus, dysbiosis in gut microbiota is causative role in the pathogenesis of diseases.

MS is a demyelinating disease caused by autoimmunity toward myelin sheath. By using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice, an animal model of MS, we have found that small intestinal microbiota is critically involved in its pathogenesis. It seems that two distinct bacteria, providing autoantigen mimicry and T-cell adjuvanticity, are responsible for EAE exacerbation.

We are also investigating the role of gut microbiota in T1D, an autoimmune disease destroying insulin-producing pancreatic -cells.. Employing streptozotocin-induced T1D mice model, we have found that Heligmosomoides polygyrus-derived trehalose ameliorates T1D and affects gut microbiota, which could result in the increase in Foxp3+CD8+Treg cells in the spleen. Treharose increases Ruminococcus species in the gut, implicating its involvement in suppressing T1D pathogenesis.

 

Keynote Forum

Fiji Antony

NMC Specialty Hospital Al Nahda, UAE

Keynote: How to deal obesity with life style modified diet
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fiji Antony photo
Biography:

Dr. Fiji Antony has been with NMC Specialty Hospital Dubai as the Chief Clinical Dietician for more than 14 years. Earlier she has worked with Ministry of Health Muscat, Sultanate of Oman and also in India. She is practicing as a Clinical Dietitian for more than 19 years. European ESPEN Diploma in Clinical nutrition and metabolism from European society for clinical nutrition and metabolism (ESPEN) is her latest achievement in the year 2016. She has earned her Doctor of Medicine in the year 2005 in Food and Nutrition. Post-Graduation in the year 1999 with First Rank in Food & Nutrition and an ICAR fellow. She has been actively following her profession in three different countries (India, Sultanate of Oman and United Arab Emirates).

 

Abstract:

Weight gain gradually happens over time during different life stages of a human being’s life. Once it gains over the standard requirement as per age, sex and anthropometry of a human being, it is commonly known as overweight. The most important factor to avoid this tendency is adaptation of change in cooking and life style changes which should not be difficult to adjust. Over many years, in this part of the world which is home to hundreds of nationalities, I learned as more flexible and regional the diet as per their cuisine; the better is going to be the outcome. The department of dietetics conducted a study on patients who consulted in OPD from May 2017 to May 2018; the data collected were from patient records. Weight reduction of 2 kg or more in a month is well maintained and consistent in follow ups. The weight reduction rate may be slow but the weight maintenance is better and thus prevents weight regain. As per the available data gathered we can even conclude those reduced weight with altered life style, modified own diet were able to maintain the weight. The data also clarifies further complication of metabolic syndrome which can be controlled as well with modified diet and exercise. All those who already have clinical conditions like DM, dyslipidemia were able to control the respective complications even though not much changes in weight.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jan O. Gordeladze photo
Biography:

Dr. Jan O. Gordeladze, PhD (born 25th of April, 1950), holds a triple professor competence (medical biochemistry, physiology, and pharmacology), and is presently working as a professor at the Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Basic Medical Science, University of Oslo, Norway. He has previously been employed as the medical director of MSD, Norway, serving two years as a Fulbright scholar at the NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, and from 2006-2009 also being employed as associate professor at the University of Montpellier, France. He is a member of the Norwegian Stem Cell Center, and his research has over the past 7-10 years been devoted to differentiation of osteochondral cells from stem cells focusing on the impact of transcription factors and microRNA species constituting regulatory loop interactions with functional target genes. He has published more than 120 scientific articles, reviews/book chapters and presented more than 250 abstracts/posters/talks at conferences world wide. Dr. Gordeladze has served as a Fulbright Scholar at The National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Washington DC during the years 1990-91.

Abstract:

To be updated

 International Conference Keynote Speaker LuLu Shimek, Adora Winquist photo
Biography:

LuLu Shimek is a Naturopathic Physician practicing in Asheville, North Carolina, United States. She graduated from the world renowned Bastyr University with a doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine. She works with patients suffering with chronic disease and specializes in autoimmune disease, digestive disorders, and chronic pain. She runs an integrative clinic, Epione Clinic for Integrative Healing , where the focus is in working with patients suffering from physical, emotional and mental trauma. She has published many articles, including WNC Woman Magazine, as well as is featured on the local TV station, WLOS, providing prevention and wellness for the community. She is a political advocate for health as Vice President of the North Carolina Association of Naturopathic Medicine and frequents Washington, DC to liase for health care reform.

Abstract:

Current widespread sympathetic dominance, anxiety and cognitive dysfunction places significant demands on the alternative medical community to create consistent, successful protocols to achieve balance within the nervous system. The case studies of patients in Phase 1 provided a common bond to trauma exemplifying the sympathetic dominance with a focus on chronic anxiety.

The discovery was made, by regenerating the whole body system by system at a cellular and at functional level the patients experienced deeper and long lasting health. Further prevention of chronic disease and systemic breakdown was developed in Phase 2 maintenance program.

Proven therapeutic protocols as well as hypothesis for further peak performance will be discussed with consideration and application to professional practice.

Learning Objectives :

1. Overview and Organ Specific Focus: Nervous System

2. Protocols for a holistic alternative approach

3. Case studies of success

4. Future hypothesis and project evolution

Keynote Forum

Bimal Roy krishna

Touro University, USA

Keynote: Psychotropic Drugs In Pregnancy
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bimal Roy krishna photo
Biography:

Dr. Krishna is currently Professor and Director of Pharmacology at the College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University in Nevada. He obtained a Bachelor of Science (First Class Honors) in Pharmacology and Physiology and a Doctor of Philosophy, Medicine (OB/GYN/Pharmacology) from Monash University in Australia. Dr. Krishna also teaches for the Step 1 USMLE and COMLEX reviews for Kaplan Medical throughout the United States and in UAE, Europe, Saudi Arabia, India, Mexico and the Caribbean. He has been teaching online for Kaplan University for over 7 years and is the contributing author for Kaplan Medical’s Pharmacology Review Book. He has contributed to numerous publications and is a member of a number of organizations including Fellow-American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract:

During pregnancy psychiatric disorders may occur requiring appropriate therapy. These conditions may also be preexisting which require careful diagnosis and monitoring.

While it is essential to treat such conditions, pregnancy limits the use of psychotropic drugs due to potential adverse fetal outcomes and possibly teratogenicity. Understandably improvement of the disease state may provide benefit to the developing fetus.

Recent studies show that up to 20% of women suffer from mood or anxiety disorders during pregnancy. Depression and anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with a variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Women who suffer from psychiatric illness during pregnancy are less likely to receive adequate prenatal care and are more likely to abuse alcohol, tobacco, and other substances known to adversely affect pregnancy outcomes. IUGR, low birth weight and fetal growth retardation in children born to depressed mothers have been documented.

Preterm delivery is another potential complication with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia, operative delivery, and infant admission to a special care nursery for a variety of conditions including respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, and prematurity.

A number of non-pharmacological options are available including cognitive behavioral and interpersonal psychotherapy. Nevertheless a considerable percentage of patients will need pharmacological intervention keeping in mind that a number of psychotropic medications may treat more than one condition.

 This presentation covers maternal mental illness and pregnancy outcome and current therapeutic interventions and guidelines

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mariusz Ratajczak photo
Biography:

Mariusz Z Ratajczak is Professor of Medicine, the Henry M and Stella M Hoenig Endowed Chair in Cancer Biology and the Director of the Developmental Biology Research Program at the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center. Among his prestigious awards is the 2014 Karl Landsteiner Life Achievement Award from the German Society of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematotherapy. He has published numerous books and more than 470 peer-reviewed publications and is a frequent speaker at conferences worldwide. His work was cited more than 17000 and his Hirsh Index is 67. 

Abstract:

Adult tissues harbor a population of rare stem cells endowed with broad differentiation potential described as very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) which display several epiblast/germline markers. Moreover, VSELs do express: several sex hormone (SexHs) receptors, respond to SexHs stimulation and share several markers characteristic of migrating primordial germ cells. Since VSELs can be specified e.g., into long-term hematopoietic hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells, this observation sheds new light on the adult stem cell hierarchy. Nevertheless, in spite of the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers, changes in the epigenetic signature of imprinted genes (e.g., by erasure of imprinting at the Igf-2–H19 locus) keep VSELs quiescent. In several emergency situations (e.g., heart infarct, stroke, skin burns), VSELs can be activated and mobilized into peripheral blood and contribute to tissue organ/regeneration. VSELs number correlates with life span in mice and we noticed a positive effect of regular physical exercise and calorie restriction on delaying age-dependent depletion of VSELs from adult tissues. Recently, we developed an efficient ex vivo expansion strategy in chemically defined medium to activate DNMT3L in these cells that re-methylates erased imprinted loci, what allows them for effective ex vivo expansion for potential clinical purposes. 

Keynote Forum

Chandran Rajagopal

Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia, Malaysia

Keynote: Introduction to electrosurgery in dermatologic and aesthetic medicine
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Chandran Rajagopal photo
Biography:

Chandran Rajagopal has completed his Graduation from the Madras Medical College, University of Madras in 1972. After his Graduation from MMC, he served in the Malaysian Health Service in the fields of Psychiatry and General Surgery. He continued his training in Dermatological Surgery in US with the American Academy of Aesthetic and Restorative Surgery in New Orleans, Louisiana under Professor George Farber and became a Fellow of the Academy and later as an International Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatologists.

Abstract:

Electrosurgery refers to four different methods: Electrocoagulation, electrodesiccation, electrofulguration and electrosection using high frequency to perform various procedures in dermatology and aesthetic surgery. Aim of this study is to ascertain the mode of operation in performing several procedures safely and successfully involving high frequency alternating current, which converts to heat by resistance as it passes through the tissue. The result of heat buildup within the tissue which results in thermal tissue damage, thus enabling several procedures, these modalities are commonly used for hemostasis, debulking procedures such as rhinophyma excision and treatment of benign and malignant skin conditions ranging from acrochordons (skin tags) to Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). Electrosurgery is a surgical technique which involves sequential curettage (scraping) of a skin lesion followed by electrodesiccation (a form of electronic cautery). The sequence is generally repeated 3 or 4 times. It is an alternative to more invasive surgery. It is used to treat benign and superficial malignant skin lesions including but not limited to seborrheic keratosis, may include observation, excision and curettage of actinic keratosis, nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma in situ. Risks include discomfort, pain, bleeding, burns, electric shock, recurrence, conversion to excision, infection, changes in pigmentation and scarring. Adequate training and understanding of the electrosurgical unit is very essential to the physician using this equipment to perform safe and successful surgery.

Keynote Forum

Syed Nabil Babar

FASN Nephrology Associate Augusta Georgia , USA

Keynote: International nephrology dialysis,access care redefined
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Syed Nabil Babar  photo
Biography:

Babar attended Medical School at the Deccan College of Medical Science, completed his Residency at Jersey Shore University Medical Center and his Fellowship at Robert Wood Johnson University in New Jersey. Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology, is also Certified by the American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology and by the American Society of Hypertension as Specialist in Clinical Hypertension.

Abstract:

Introduction: Subspecialty of nephrology involving endovascular procedures essential for maintenance and management
of dialysis access. Vascular access (AVF, AVG, HD catheter) is proclaimed as the “lifeline” and “Achilles heel” for patients
on hemodialysis Procedures, Vein Mapping (ultrasound+ contrast injection), Balloon assisted maturation. Endovascular
coiling of accessory/collateral veins, Angioplasty of stenotic segment within or outside the conduit, Thrombectomy (declotting)
of AVF/AVG, Stent graft placement, Tunneled catheter placement, exchange and removal, Peritoneal dialysis
catheter placement, exchange and removal Pros and Cons of Interventional Nephrology
Pros: Expeditious care, Patient/physician familiarity, Smooth communication, Achieving superior
Cons: Limited training opportunities, Interventional “turf ” issues Impact of VAC on hospitalize
Impact of VAC on hospitalization & missed dialysis treatments: Retrospective analysis of vascular access-related
hospitalized days and missed outpatient dialysis treatments from 1995-2002 in 21 Phoenix dialysis facilities and 1275
Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) units within the U.S. to evaluate the impact of introduction of VAC
in Phoenix, Decline in hospitalized days and missed treatments/patient year evident from 1997-2001 across all access
types with a greater decline in Phoenix coinciding with creation of VAC in 1998 ,VAC development was associated with a
significant decrease in vascular access-related hospitalization and missed outpatient dialysis treatments

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Solomon Habtemariam photo
Biography:

Solomon Habtemariam has completed his PhD, 2 years of Post-doctoral Research (Strathclyde Institute for Drug Research) and 4 years of Lectureship at Strathclyde University. Since then, he has been a leader of researches on bioassays & natural products-based drug development at the University of Greenwich and Founder/Owner of Herbal Analysis Services. He is an Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the African Academic Institute and the African Academy of Sciences. He has published over 130 papers in peer reviewed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member for many journals.

Abstract:

For thousands of years, mankind has used nature as a source of medicine. Despite the tremendous advances in medicinal chemistry and/or drug discovery areas over the years, our modern pharmacy even today employs a significant number of drugs that trace their origin back to natural products. Inflammatory diseases, especially chronic disorders such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, sepsis, etc., continue to be a burden to large number of people and national health services throughout the world. With the severe limitations of the existing anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. cost, side effects and efficacy) for such diseases, the appetite for novel drugs is as great as ever. During the past three decades, our researches have been mainly focusing on the identification of novel pharmacologically active compounds from medicinal plants. By using the bioassay-guided isolation approach, we have identified numerous compounds that showed potential in the various experimental models. In this communication, case examples are presented where the anti-inflammatory potential of crude and purified natural products have been validated through cell-free, cell-based and animal models of inflammation.

Keynote Forum

Adel Cortas

Former Agricultural Minister,Lebanon

Keynote: Keynote Forum
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Adel Cortas photo
Biography:

Abstract:

The Food Safety Law in Lebanon:  What Is Next ?                       

            On 24 October 2016, the Food Safety Law in Lebanon was approved and published by the parliament as Law N0:35. Consumers protection advocates, in Lebanon were waiting for the government to implement the provisions of the new safety law which will improve public health. The majority of the Lebanese public and international community agreed and questioned how come that Lebanon waited so long until the end of the Twentieth century without having a Law covering Food Safety? It was until the beginning of the 21st century (in 2004) that a draft Law was introduced, discussed and finally approved by the parliament. The answer to this query came out that special private interests of some Lebanese agricultural producers and merchants were benefitting from the loose enforcement of the law and regulations to seek the highest profit possible. In fact, before the publication of the Food Safety Law, there were nine government agencies in the different ministries and independent ones. All of them were dealing with Food Safety in one or the other. But there was no coordination among them whatsoever. Responsibilities, activities and terms of reference of these agencies are described in details in the paper.

In articles 22-23 there is a detailed description of the Food Safety Lebanese Commission (FSLC) responsibilities. It is referred to as FSLC. In short it is the FDA of Lebanon. A detailed description of the FSLC will come out in the paper.

The major objective of the paper will aim at preparing a proposed program on what should be done by the Lebanese Government in order to reach a better level in Food Safety conditions. A detailed analysis is made of these articles and confront them with the work done by  assisting  the nine agencies dealing with Food Safety in Lebanon. The problem is that so far, we don’t have a program or a policy dealing with Food Safety in Lebanon. The Food Safety law will help a great deal to fill this gap.

The second objective is to look into more details into the problems of education and training of professionals dealing with Food Safety in Lebanon. We pride ourselves in Lebanon, for the number universities we have. However, the number of universities dealing with agriculture will not exceed six and the those dealing with nutrition and food safety are the American University of Beirut (AUB) and the Lebanese American university (LAU). Some incentives should be given to the other four universities teaching Agriculture in Lebanon to do some research and give courses dealing with Food Safety.

The third objective of this new program refers to the urgency for the Councils of Ministers in Lebanon to establish the FSLC and appoint its chairman and members. When the FSLC is established it has to organize itself and prepare all the documents mentioned in article 27 of the food safety law. Then FSLC will prepare the program or food policy in Lebanon in cooperation with representatives from the nine agencies. A food Safety System will be established this way and should contain a sub-system of monitoring and evaluation of activities and responsibilities. This would help in the preparation of the annual report referred to in article 31 of the Food Safety Law. A continuous training program should be programmed annually between FSLC and representatives of the Nine agencies, in cooperation with the universities teaching Nutrition and Food Safety. LAU, within its Food Safety program is giving annually a course with a certificate in Food Safety. This certificate was highly appreciated by the Syndicate of the Lebanese Food Industries (SLFI) and the General Union of Arab Chambers of Commerce. They were willing to pay higher salaries for those having the certificate on Food Safety training.

The success of this new law depends on how it will be implemented. A campaign should immediately be launched, now that the law is enacted to draw attention to its importance and added value to Lebanese citizens.

Biography: Adel Cortas was the Minister of Agriculture in Lebanon from 1992 to 1995. His background is in Agriculture Engineering (Grignon-Paris, France) and Agricultural Economic and Planning(East Lansing, USA and USJ, Beirut).He served FAO for 26 years as FAO Representative in Morocco and Assistant to ADG for Economic and Social Affairs and  education background is mainly in Agricultural production, planning and agricultural economics

 

                           

Keynote Forum

Boris M. Petrikovsky

American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, USA

Keynote: Fetal response to Maternal exercise: A new test in fetal medicine
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Boris M. Petrikovsky photo
Biography:

Boris Petrikovsky completed his postgraduate training at SUNY Downstate/Maimonides Medical Center (Brooklyn, NY) and his fellowship in Maternal-Fetal Medicine at the University of Connecticut in 1988. That same year, he was a visiting researcher at Kings College School of Medicine (London, UK), specializing in Fetal Medicine and Surgery. From 1992-1999, he served as a Chief of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at North Shore University Hospital.  He serves as a member of the editorial board of journals of neonatal intensive care, ultrasound diagnosis in obstetrics and pediatrics. He also serves as a reviewer for the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound and Obstetrics and Gynecology. His major research interests are fetal medicine, prenatal diagnosis, fetoscopy, fetal cardiology, Ob/Gyn sonography and invasive Ob/Gyn procedures. He is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Maternal-Fetal Medicine. He is a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at NYU School of Medicine.

 

Abstract:

Introduction: Exercise in pregnancy has been shown to benefit most women, improves or maintains physical fitness, helps with weight management, reduces the risk of gestational diabetes, and enhances patient’s psychological well-being. Currently, the contraction stress test (CST) is the only existing test to assess fetal reserves. However, CST has a limited use because it requires IV placement and may put the patient in preterm labor. We propose a new test to assess fetal reserves by measuring fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to maternal exercise.

Material & Methods: In this case, 819 patients between 36 and 42 weeks of pregnancy were included in the study. A total of 1980 fetal assessments were performed for the following indications: Decreased fetal movements, advanced maternal age, restricted fetal growth, diabetes, post-term pregnancy, and a history of fetal distress during previous pregnancies. For maternal exercises, we used a motorized treadmill in a moderate exercise regimen (15-minute fast walk at a speed of 3 mph with an incline of 15 degrees to 25 degrees). Adverse fetal outcomes were considered if one or more of the following were present: Category III FHR tracing; 5-minute Apgar score of less than 7; admission to the neonatal intensive care nursery, unrelated to prematurity; fetal growth restriction; fetal and early neonatal demise. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW Statistics (version 18.0; IBM Corporation, New York, NY).

Conclusion: It appears that positive FRME has a high correlation with adverse perinatal outcome.

 

Keynote Forum

Daniel Racoceanu

Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Peru

Keynote: Integrative computational pathology and beyond
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daniel Racoceanu photo
Biography:

Daniel Racoceanu is a Professor in Biomedical Imaging and Data Computing at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Since 2016, he has a tenured Professor position at Sorbonne Université since 2011. His areas of competency are Medical Image Analysis, Pattern Recognition, and Machine Learning with his present research being mainly focused on Digital Pathology and its Integrative aspects. He has completed Dr.Habil. (2006) and PhD (1997) at University of Franche-Comté, France. He was Project Manager at General Electric Energy Products - Europe, before joining, in 1999, as a Associate Professor at the University of Franche-Comté and Research Fellow at FEMTO-ST Institute (French National Research Center - CNRS), Besancon, France. Between 2014 and 2016, he was a member of the Executive Board of the University Institute of Health Engineering of the Sorbonne Université, Paris. During the same period, he lead the Cancer Theranostics research team at the Bioimaging Lab, a joint research unit created between Sorbonne Université, CNRS and INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research). He participated in the creation of International Joint Research Unit (UMI CNRS) in Singapore, being the Director (from 2008 to 2014) of this joint research venture between the Sorbonne Université (SU), the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), and the Univ. Grenoble Alpes (UGA), in Singapore. From 2009 to 2015, he was Full Professor (adj.) at the School of Computing, National University of Singapore (NUS).

Abstract:

Histopathology examination represents a milestone of the diagnostic and therapeutic decision. Concretized by the pathology report, essential to the multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings in hospitals. It relies on professional observation and judgment, integrating: morphological criteria (tumor morphological identity) issued from standard and complementary (histochemistry, enzymology, hybridation in situ, scores) preparations’ observations, consolidated by clinical, radiological and biological contexts - among which, molecular. The future of histopathology is obviously digital (data and images). The challenge is to conciliate, in the framework of the healthcare, various usual missions as: doing the diagnosis for the patient in the present moment, warehousing the medical data for the patient record, and also feeding and structuring the research strategy - particularly in oncology. Due to it's important legal role, the pathology has a key position in the medical diagnostic. At the junction of medical imaging modalities and the omics, this medical exam represents the bottleneck enabling us to go to building a representative local database. We are initiating a program of care monitoring for which the milestones and the impact will be: the production of digital histopathology tools, the modeling of the pathway and the conceptualization of the associated massive database in Peru, with a strong wish to extend it to Andean and Latin American countries. This initiative will allow us to bring in and structure a database (whole slide images, omics, clinical data and metadata) corresponding to a very diverse population (mestizos, amerindians, european, asian-peruvian, afro-peruvians ...) coming from very different regions (coast, rainforest, highlands), with difficult access and difficult to reach, representative to Peru/Andean/Latin American regions.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Solomon Habtemariam photo
Biography:

Solomon Habtemariam has completed his PhD, 2 years of Post-doctoral Research (Strathclyde Institute for Drug Research) and 4 years of Lectureship at Strathclyde University. Since then, he has been a leader of researches on bioassays & natural products-based drug development at the University of Greenwich and Founder/Owner of Herbal Analysis Services. He is an Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the African Academic Institute and the African Academy of Sciences. He has published over 130 papers in peer reviewed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member for many journals.

Abstract:

For thousands of years, mankind has used nature as a source of medicine. Despite the tremendous advances in medicinal chemistry and/or drug discovery areas over the years, our modern pharmacy even today employs a significant number of drugs that trace their origin back to natural products. Inflammatory diseases, especially chronic disorders such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, sepsis, etc., continue to be a burden to large number of people and national health services throughout the world. With the severe limitations of the existing anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. cost, side effects and efficacy) for such diseases, the appetite for novel drugs is as great as ever. During the past three decades, our researches have been mainly focusing on the identification of novel pharmacologically active compounds from medicinal plants. By using the bioassay-guided isolation approach, we have identified numerous compounds that showed potential in the various experimental models. In this communication, case examples are presented where the anti-inflammatory potential of crude and purified natural products have been validated through cell-free, cell based and animal models of inflammation.

Keynote Forum

Harold D. Schultz

University of Nebraska College of Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska

Keynote: Chemoreflex Dysfunction in Heart Failure: Why It Should Not Be Ignored
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Harold D. Schultz photo
Biography:

My research interests are preclinical translational studies aimed to improve baro and chemo reflexes control of autonomic, respiratory, renal and cardiac function, using a variety of approaches such as gene manipulation, novel pharmacological interventions, exercise/diet, and surgical interventions (e.g. cardiac, carotid body, renal denervations). In contemporary studies, we have focused on carotid body chemoreflex function in heart. Hyper-sensitization and tonic activation of the carotid body chemoreflex coupled with suppression of the baroreflex functionally exacerbates renal and cardiac dysfunction (cardio-renal syndrome) leading to increased morbidity and mortality in animal models of systolic heart failure. Our recent evidence suggests that these effects are tied to altered regulation of the major anti-oxidant transcription factors Nrf2 and KLF2. NIH and AHA grants have continuously funded these and other neuro-circulatory related studies under my direction over the past thirty-five years, including a Program Project Grant for the past 17 years

Abstract:

Enhanced arterial chemoreflex function is strongly related to cardiorespiratory disorders and disease progression in heart failure (HF). The mechanisms underlying chemoreflex sensitization during HF are not fully understood. We have utilized preclinical animal models of HF to describe an important role of both carotid body and central chemoreceptor function on autonomic and cardio-respiratory dysfunction in both HFrEF (cardiac pacing in rabbits and myocardial infarct in rats) and HFpEF (arterial-venous fistula in rats). Despite the etiology of HF, HFrEF and HFpEF animals exhibit similar cardio-respiratory abnormalities of periodic breathing, sympatho-vagal imbalance, and arrhythmias. In HFrEF animals, carotid body chemoreflex sensitivity is enhanced, but central chemoreflex sensitivity is minimally impacted. Whereas, in HFpEF animals, the opposite scenario it true.  In HFrEF, carotid body ablation restores normal breathing patterns and autonomic balance, reduces arrhythmias and increases survival. The enhanced neural activity from the carotid body in HFrEF and its impact on sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability are related to a chronic reduction in cardiac output that down regulates a flow sensitive transcription factor KLF2 in the carotid body. In HFpEF, carotid body function is not markedly altered, consistent with normal blood flow and KLF2 expression in the carotid  body, but central chemoreflex sensitivity to changes in PaCO2 is markedly enhanced and correlates with the sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability observed in that condition. These studies suggest that the differential influences of HFrEF and HFpEF on carotid body and central chemoreceptor function are related to differences in systemic hemodynamics and blood flow. Nevertheless, elevated chemoreflex activity, whether from the carotid body or central chemoreceptors, contributes a major role to the sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability seen in HF. Clinical evaluation of chemoreflex sensitivity in HF patients can provide important information about the etiology of autonomic/respiratory dysfunction and disease progression in these patients and may guide more targeted therapeutic strategies

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Oleg V Tcheremissine photo
Biography:

Oleg V Tcheremissine, MD, is a Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Atrium Health. He is a board-certified Psychiatrist with 30 years of medical and more than 25 years of research experience in human behavioral and applied clinical psychopharmacology. He has served as a Principal Investigator for numerous pre-clinical and Phase II-IV clinical trials in a range of neuropsychiatric indications. More recently, his research has been focused on developing new insights into neurodegenerative diseases with a primary emphasis on advancing pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s Disorder and other cognitive disorders. He has successfully combined his research interests with his teaching, clinical, and administrative responsibilities while focusing on eliminating external and internal barriers to novel and innovative treatments with the overall goal of reducing health disparities, improving access to care and increasing the generalizability of clinical trials results.

Abstract:

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a devastating progressive neurogenerative disorder resulting from pathological changes in the brain. AD manifests by a broad range of symptoms affecting memory, concentration, volition, and leading to significant impairment in all activities of daily living. The currently approved pharmacological treatments have only limited efficacy and provide mostly symptomatic benefits as they do not specifically target the underlying pathology of AD. AD pathology is characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ), tau-protein, and associated inflammatory response. The amyloid cascade hypothesis has been the basis for developing an entire new class of disease-modifying therapeutics. In the past 20 years, there have been more than 100 attempts to develop new pharmacological agents, including a wide range of therapeutics targeting different components of the amyloid cascade. Based on their role in the amyloid cascade and the primary mechanisms of action, these new therapies could be divided into three subclasses: a) aimed at reducing production of Aβ; b) aimed at promoting Aβ clearance; and c) aimed at reducing Aβ aggregation. This session will provide a critical overview of the amyloid cascade hypothesis in AD and discuss the future directions in drug development for AD

Keynote Forum

Harold D. Schultz

University of Nebraska College of Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska

Keynote: Chemoreflex Dysfunction in Heart Failure: Why It Should Not Be Ignored
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Harold D. Schultz photo
Biography:

My research interests are preclinical translational studies aimed to improve baro and chemo reflexes control of autonomic, respiratory, renal and cardiac function, using a variety of approaches such as gene manipulation, novel pharmacological interventions, exercise/diet, and surgical interventions (e.g. cardiac, carotid body, renal denervations). In contemporary studies, we have focused on carotid body chemoreflex function in heart. Hyper-sensitization and tonic activation of the carotid body chemoreflex coupled with suppression of the baroreflex functionally exacerbates renal and cardiac dysfunction (cardio-renal syndrome) leading to increased morbidity and mortality in animal models of systolic heart failure. Our recent evidence suggests that these effects are tied to altered regulation of the major anti-oxidant transcription factors Nrf2 and KLF2. NIH and AHA grants have continuously funded these and other neuro-circulatory related studies under my direction over the past thirty-five years, including a Program Project Grant for the past 17 years

Abstract:

Enhanced arterial chemoreflex function is strongly related to cardiorespiratory disorders and disease progression in heart failure (HF). The mechanisms underlying chemoreflex sensitization during HF are not fully understood. We have utilized preclinical animal models of HF to describe an important role of both carotid body and central chemoreceptor function on autonomic and cardio-respiratory dysfunction in both HFrEF (cardiac pacing in rabbits and myocardial infarct in rats) and HFpEF (arterial-venous fistula in rats). Despite the etiology of HF, HFrEF and HFpEF animals exhibit similar cardio-respiratory abnormalities of periodic breathing, sympatho-vagal imbalance, and arrhythmias. In HFrEF animals, carotid body chemoreflex sensitivity is enhanced, but central chemoreflex sensitivity is minimally impacted. Whereas, in HFpEF animals, the opposite scenario it true.  In HFrEF, carotid body ablation restores normal breathing patterns and autonomic balance, reduces arrhythmias and increases survival. The enhanced neural activity from the carotid body in HFrEF and its impact on sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability are related to a chronic reduction in cardiac output that down regulates a flow sensitive transcription factor KLF2 in the carotid body. In HFpEF, carotid body function is not markedly altered, consistent with normal blood flow and KLF2 expression in the carotid  body, but central chemoreflex sensitivity to changes in PaCO2 is markedly enhanced and correlates with the sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability observed in that condition. These studies suggest that the differential influences of HFrEF and HFpEF on carotid body and central chemoreceptor function are related to differences in systemic hemodynamics and blood flow. Nevertheless, elevated chemoreflex activity, whether from the carotid body or central chemoreceptors, contributes a major role to the sympathetic hyperactivity and breathing instability seen in HF. Clinical evaluation of chemoreflex sensitivity in HF patients can provide important information about the etiology of autonomic/respiratory dysfunction and disease progression in these patients and may guide more targeted therapeutic strategies

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fazlul H. Sarkar photo
Biography:

Dr. Sarkar has completed his Ph.D at the age of 26 years from Banaras Hindu University andcontinued postdoctoral studies at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute in New York. He has published 555 peer-reviewed research articles and review articles, and also published 50 book chapters. He edited four books and he is an Academic Editor for PLoS One, and alsoserves in the editorial board of 10 cancer journals. His basic science research led to drugdiscovery and he is an expert in conducting translational research including clinical trials.

Abstract:

Prostate cancer (PCa) is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) but it becomes refractory and leads to metastasis (mCRPC) which is incurable, suggesting that innovative treatment options are urgently needed. We found deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) such as miR-34a, miR-124, miR-27b, miR-320 and the let-7 family, and it appears to play important roles in regulating androgen receptor (AR) splice variant expression. The miR-320 and let-7 family inhibit the expression of stem cell markers such as Lin28B, EZH2, Nanog, Oct4 and CD44, which are associated with enzalutamide resistance, and thus could be responsible for the development of mCRPC. These dysregulations can be attenuated by treatment of PCa cells with 3,3’-Diindolylmethane (BR-DIM), which led to conduct a clinical trial. In the phase II clinical trial with localized PCa pateints were treated with BR-DIM at a dose of 225 mg orally twice daily for a minimum of 14 days. DIM levels and AR activity were measured at the time of prostatectomy. Moreover, we also assessed the level of expression of miRNAs and the expression of AR and its splice variants in the radical prostatectomy specimens and compared it with diagnostic biopsy specimens.   We found that BR-DIM treatment caused down regulation in the expression of AR, AR splice variants, Lin28B and EZH2, which appears to be mediated through the re-expression of let-7, miR-27b and miR-320 and miR-34a in human PCa specimens after BR-DIM treatment. In summary, our results provides the scientific basis for a “proof-of-concept” for therapeutic clinical trial for achieving better treatment outcome which will have a significant impact on the management of PCa patients.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Guy Hagues Fontaine photo
Biography:

Guy Hugues Fontaine has made 15 original contributions at the inception of cardiac pacemakers in the mid-60s. He has identified ARVD as a side work during the beginning of antiarrhythmic surgery in the late 70s. He has published more than 860 scientific papers including 197 book chapters. He was the Reviewer of 17 journals both in clinical and basic Science. He has also served for 5 years as a Member of the Editorial Board of Circulation. He has been invited to give 11 master’s lectures of 90 minutes each during three weeks in the top universities of China (2014).

Abstract:

A group from Paris has attempted to demonstrate a link between fat in the epicardium of atrial tissue to the production of fibrosis as a possible mechanism of atrial fibrillation (AF). In their discussion and conclusion the authors admit that the mechanism of AF is not completely understood. After an excellent review of the CMR techniques available for the identification of fat, fibrosis and water in the heart, they note a lack of spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques that result in their performing ex vivo CMR on two hearts. This However, the modern digital microscope has an optimal resolution which could enable a more precise interpretation of the pathophysiology of AF.

The knowledge accumulated from my study of the histology of ARVD of the right ventricle from 73 patients clearly shows the topographic structure of fat, fibrosis and possible superimposed myocarditis. The atrial structure of the so-called “normal heart” is similar to that observed on the free wall of the right ventricle in ARVD. In addition to epicardial fat, there is fibrosis of two forms, interstitial fibrosis which can be the result of the genetic disorder of the disease or, replacement fibrosis which may be the result of myocarditis generally starting from the epicardium (epicardial-myocarditis as it is known by clinicians).  A superimposed myocarditis may have a spectrum of presentation from the fulminant form leading to acute heart failure and death in a few days associated with invasion of both ventricles and atria by lymphocytes to that of a completely healed hyaline fibrosis. There may be intermediate aspects of myocarditis with a variable number of clusters of lymphocytes inside strands of fibrosis called the chronic-active form. Also, there may be a genetic factor now considered to be of increasing importance in the understanding of ventricular cardiomyopathies. In the background of atrial fibrillation these cardiomyopathies can be present but quiescent without arrhythmias in the general population. There can be additional complexity if we consider that myocarditis alone can cause fibrosis and adipocytes. Therefore, myocarditis can produce an arrhythmogenic substrate. In addition, the acute form can be a trigger of arrhythmias associated with an increase of CRP .The same gene that is responsible for the problem in atrial development can also explain the increased susceptibility of these hearts to be affected by myocarditis in a single or in multiple episodes by entero and adeno viruses. Therefore, the prevention or treatment of lone atrial fibrillation may be due to two targets: protection against and/or suppression of viruses and prevention of fibrosis. In the future, the ideal approach to prevention of atrial fibrillation will be the modification of the human genome using the genetic approaches such as the CRISPRcas9. Finally, the results obtained in the treatment of atrial fibrillation may be expanded to the treatment of the whole heart since the atrium and ventricle are two parts of the same embryologic structure as has been recently confirmed by the finding of “atrial dysplasia” .A simple new tool to evaluate patients at risk of atrial fibrillation and to follow the effect of treatment should be the use of the new 16 lead High Definition ECG recorder.

Break: 10:10-10:30

Keynote Forum

Bimal Roy Krishna

Professor and Director of Pharmacology

Keynote: Current Guidelines for the Management of Asthma
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bimal Roy Krishna photo
Biography:

Dr. Krishna is currently Professor and Director of Pharmacology at the College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University in Nevada. He obtained a Bachelor of Science (First Class Honors) in Pharmacology and Physiology and a Doctor of Philosophy, Medicine (OB/GYN/Pharmacology) from Monash University in Australia. Dr. Krishna also teaches for the Step 1 USMLE and COMLEX reviews for Kaplan Medical throughout the United States and in UAE, Europe, Saudi Arabia, India, Mexico and the Caribbean. He has been teaching online for Kaplan University for over 7 years and is the contributing author for Kaplan Medical’s Pharmacology Review Book. He has contributed to numerous publications and is a member of a number of organizations including Fellow-American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract:

Asthma is considered to be primarily an inflammatory disorder with secondary
bronchoconstriction. Patient manifestations usually are shortness of breath, wheezing, cough
and chest tightness. The intensity may vary over time and become exacerbated with external
factors that further irritate the airway.
While bronchial hyperactivity and airway inflammation may likely be present they are not the
only factors that determine diagnosis. Identification of external and other factors that
exacerbate asthma is crucial and smoking is also a modifiable factor.
High risk patients including geriatric and pediatric patients may require more aggressive
treatment.
The long term goals of management are to achieve long term symptomatic relief which may
include the use of prophylactic agents. Management of asthma initially supported the use of a
short acting bronchodilator and prophylactic management where deemed necessary.
The categories of asthma medications include controller, reliever, prophylactic and add-on
medications.
Effective 2019 the GINA guidelines no longer support the use of short acting bronchodilators as
preferred initial therapy. Preferential therapy now favors the use of inhaled corticosteroids
with a short acting bronchodilator. A step-up approach is initiated when necessary, which
includes dosage adjustment of inhaled corticosteroids with bronchodilators and eventually to
include adjunct medications and monoclonals.
This presentation outlines the pathogenesis of asthma, patient presentation and diagnosis current treatment guidelines.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kjell Fuxe photo
Biography:

Kjell Fuxe has worked at Karolinska Institute, Sweden since 1960, became Prosektor in 1968 and Professor in 1979. He has been a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience
since 2005. He published over 1589 papers. He is a member of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and foreign member of Mexican Academy of Sciences
and was a member of the Nobel Assembly. He is mainly known for his work on central monoamine neurons, volume transmission and its different forms, receptor-receptor
interactions in the CNS and neuropsychopharmacology.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Th e discovery of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes in the
plasma membrane of nerve cells in the CNS gave a new dimension to brain integration, plasticity and neuropsychopharmacology.
Aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that diff erent types of D2 heteroreceptor complexes are new targets in the treatment
of schizophrenia and cocaine use disorder. D2 receptors in the complexes can also interact with ion channel receptors, receptor
tyrosine kinases and/or adapter proteins. Disturbances in the D2 complexes can contribute to schizophrenia development and
cocaine use disorder through changes in the balance of the activity of diverse D2 homo-and heteroreceptor complexes of the
ventral striatopallidal GABA anti-reward pathway regulating salience.
Methodology & Th eoretical Orientation: Proximity ligation assays and biochemical binding techniques were used with
behavioral correlates.
Findings: Agonist activation of A2A protomer in the A2A–D2 heteroreceptor complex inhibits D2 Gi/o mediated signaling
but increases the D2 β-arrestin2 mediated signaling. Th rough this allosteric receptor–receptor interaction, the A2A agonist
becomes a biased inhibitory modulator of the Gi/o mediated D2 signaling, which may be the main mechanism for its atypical
antipsychotic properties. Th e dopamine (DA) and glutamate hypotheses of schizophrenia come together in the signal
integration in D2–NMDAR and A2A–D2–mGluR5 heteroreceptor complexes, especially in the ventral striatum. Cocaine selfadministration
diff erentially aff ected allosteric A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions in the ventral vs. the dorsal striatum.
Conclusion & Signifi cance: Dysregulation of the meso-limbic DA neurons and their post junctional D2 heteroreceptor targets
may be involved in producing the symptoms of schizophrenia. Potential diff erences in the composition and stoichiometry of
the A2A-D2 heteroreceptor complexes, including diff erential recruitment of sigma 1 receptor, to the ventral vs. dorsal striatum
may explain the selective antagonistic A2A-D2 receptor interactions observed aft er cocaine self-administration in nucleus
accumbens explaining the anti-cocaine actions of A2A agonists.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Karen Tarasenko photo
Biography:

Karen Tarasenko has completed his PhD from V.P. Kukhar Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Petrochemistry. He is the Chemist of UORSY and Chemical Adviser in Chem Space.

 

Abstract:

Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) became an important strategy complementary to conventional high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns in both academia and industry. The basic idea behind FBDD approaches is to initially identify, usually by screening small focused libraries of low molecular weight compounds (fragments) via biophysical methods, key chemical substructures or pharmacophores sufficient to confer a minimal yet specific interaction with the given target identified by structural studies using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As a follow up, identified fragment hits could be converted into more potent binders by a variety of approaches using structural information of identified hits.

 

Chemspace reports variety of fluorine-containing molecules which satisfy criteria of fragments (122<MW<300; HbA≤3; HbD≤2; logP≤4; RotBonds≤3) and examples of follow up development into focused libraries of specific binders. There are distinct sub-groups of molecules to identify specific interaction:

 

  • Aromatic compounds with small substituents in the pattern
  • Compounds with enriched Fsp3
    • increased chirality
    • dimensionality
    • improved physico-chemical properties
    • improved diversity in follow up

 

Approaches to expand chemical space from the Chemspace commercially available or de-novo synthesis of new fragments and compounds from a 120M database is discussed.

Fluorine atom serves as a marker for the identification of initial binders by NMR and may or may not be present in the final molecules as a structural feature.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Karen Tarasenko photo
Biography:

Karen Tarasenko has completed his PhD from V.P. Kukhar Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Petrochemistry. He is the Chemist of UORSY and Chemical Adviser in Chem Space.

 

Abstract:

Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) became an important strategy complementary to conventional high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns in both academia and industry. The basic idea behind FBDD approaches is to initially identify, usually by screening small focused libraries of low molecular weight compounds (fragments) via biophysical methods, key chemical substructures or pharmacophores sufficient to confer a minimal yet specific interaction with the given target identified by structural studies using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As a follow up, identified fragment hits could be converted into more potent binders by a variety of approaches using structural information of identified hits.

 

Chemspace reports variety of fluorine-containing molecules which satisfy criteria of fragments (122<MW<300; HbA≤3; HbD≤2; logP≤4; RotBonds≤3) and examples of follow up development into focused libraries of specific binders. There are distinct sub-groups of molecules to identify specific interaction:

 

  • Aromatic compounds with small substituents in the pattern
  • Compounds with enriched Fsp3
    • increased chirality
    • dimensionality
    • improved physico-chemical properties
    • improved diversity in follow up

 

Approaches to expand chemical space from the Chemspace commercially available or de-novo synthesis of new fragments and compounds from a 120M database is discussed.

Fluorine atom serves as a marker for the identification of initial binders by NMR and may or may not be present in the final molecules as a structural feature.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tsu-Hsun Hou photo
Biography:

Tsu-Hsun Hou is currently pursuing Master's degree at National Sun Yat-sen University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. In recent years, he has been particularly engaged in the research of metal high-entropy alloys, biomolecules, polymers, supramolecules and so on. He has also worked with a number of medical research institutions and through both the experimental and the analog end of the collaboration, research efficiency can be greatly improved.

Abstract:

The unit cell of two-dimensional STA supramolecule on a virtual graphene surface was predicted in this study. The
DRIEDING force field was used to describe the interatomic interactions and the Electrostatic Surface Potential (ESP)
charges obtained by the semi-empirical ab initio package VAMP with the NDDO (Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap)
Hamiltonians approximation method of PM6 (Parameterization Method 6) was used for the DREIDING potential. First, the
Stochastic Tunneling-Basin-Hopping-Discrete molecular dynamics method (STUN-BH-DMD) was used to predict the most
stable STA layer on the virtual graphene surface. The box shape was adjusted during the STUN-BH-DMD search process and
the ordered unit cell of STA supramolecule was predicted. The molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the
thermal stability and diffusion behaviors of STA supramolecule. The energy-temperature profiles were used to pinpoint the
temperatures, at which the STA supramolecule structure begins damaged and the mean-square displacement profiles were
used to investigate the dynamical behaviors of STA supramolecules at different temperatures as well as deriving the diffusion
coefficients of STA.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ronald S Brown photo
Biography:

Ronald S Brown (DDS, MS Dipl. ABOM, FACD and FICD) graduated from Georgetown University School of Dentistry in 1971. He practiced General Dentistry in the US Army and private practice in the DC metropolitan area until 1985. He graduated with an MS in Pharmacology and a certificate in Oral Medicine in 1988, also from Georgetown University. He has held faculty positions at Georgetown University School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Dental Branch and currently serves as a Professor at Howard University College of Dentistry, as a Clinical Associate Professor at Georgetown University Medical Center and as a Volunteer Clinical Research Associate at NHLBI/NIH. His research interests concern Oral Inflammatory Disorders, Oral Graft vs. Host Disease and Drug-induced gingival overgrowth. He has presented over 175 CDE presentations and is recognized as one of the top CDE presenters by Dentistry Today. He has over 100 peer reviewed journal publications, and he has written over ten books and book chapters. He received the Abraham Reiner Diamond Pin Award for lifetime achievement in the field of Oral Medicine and the Organization of Teachers of Oral Diagnosis Outstanding Educator Award. He is a past President of the American Academy of Oral Medicine, the current President of the American Board of Oral Medicine and the current Secretary of the American Board of Dental Specialties.

Abstract:

The disfiguring side-effect of DIGO (drug-induced gingival overgrowth) was first reported in 1939. The mechanism and the development of successful repeatable therapeutic protocols have baffled researchers and clinicians for over 85 years. Recently, a conceptual unifying hypothesis describing the mechanism was developed which has led to the elucidation of the first mechanistic step. The initial query was to determine a commonality between the three very different drug categories (Anti-convulsants, Calcium channel blocking agents and calcineurin inhibitors) which could plug into a defined pathway. The pathway was eventually put together as decreased cation flux leading to decreased cellular folate intake, decreased AP-1, increased TIMP-1; decreased MMP-1 & 2 and decreased collagenase activation. The determination of the pathway has potential even beyond the development of successful therapeutic protocols for DIGO. 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Monika I Konaklieva photo
Biography:

Monika Konaklieva completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry - Organic Synthesis from SUNY Buffalo -1997 and became a visiting professor in Medicinal Chemistry at
Midwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (1997-1999). She is currently an Associate Professor at American University. She has published more than 40 papers in
reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several chemistry journals publishing in the areas of organic and medicinal chemistry.

Abstract:

b-Lactams have historically been viewed as a class of antimicrobials. However, this paradigm is shifting towards a focus
on their ability to function as inhibitors of bacterial enzymes, particularly those involved in broad-spectrum b-lactam
resistance, i.e., extended spectrum b-lactamases (ESBL). This shift in focus is the result of the recognition of the b-lactam’s
ability to acylate enzymes, the majority of which have serine as the nucleophile in the active site. In addition to being inhibitors
of bacterial enzymes, b-lactams also inhibit viral and mammalian serine enzymes demonstrating inter-kingdom activity. The
focus of this presentation is on the evaluation of the potential of b-lactam antibiotics as inhibitors of the serine enzymes of both
prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin, with the specific focus on the structure-function relationship of b-lactams as antimicrobial and
antineoplastic agents.

Keynote Forum

Stéphane Bolduc

Director of Regenerative Medicine CHU de Québec-Université Laval

Keynote: Overactive Bladder in the Pediatric Population Name: Dr Stéphane Bolduc
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stéphane Bolduc photo
Biography:

Dr Bolduc has completed his urology residency at Université Laval and completed a fellowship in pediatric urology at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. He is chief of pediatric urology and the director of Regenerative Medicine of CHU de Québec Research Center. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as section editor of pediatric urology of CUAJ. \r\n

Abstract:

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This condition is especially troublesome for pediatric patients and their families when associated with incontinence since it negatively affects self-esteem and impairs children’s development. A stepwise approach is favored to treat this pathology, starting with behavioral therapy, followed by medical management, and eventually more invasive procedures. \r\nAntimuscarinic agents are the mainstay of medical treatment for OAB. Oxybutynin is the most commonly used antimuscarinic in the pediatric population. However, some patients have a suboptimal response to antimuscarinics and many experience bothersome side effects. Although there have been reports about the use of tolterodine, fesoterodine, trospium, propiverine and solifenacin in children, to date, only oxybutynin has been officially approved for pediatric in most countries. \r\nHowever, patients with severe OAB symptoms seem not to always respond adequately to oxybutynin. After failure with a first pharmacologic molecule, most practitioners will try a more specific anticholinergic. We have already studied various options to treat children with non-neurogenic refractory OAB, namely trying a different antimuscarinic (tolterodine, fesoterodine, or solifenacin) as well as combining two different anticholinergics. Despite favorable results with these options, they remain unapproved for pediatric use and other therapeutic avenues are therefore worth investigating.\r\nMirabegron, a new molecule with a distinct mechanism of action (β3-adrenoreceptor agonist), has recently been approved as monotherapy for idiopathic OAB in adults, but it has not been studied in the pediatric population. We recently concluded on two open-label studies to explore its efficacy and safety in children. It appears as a safe and effective alternative for children with idiopathic OAB refractory to antimuscarinics, in monotherapy or in association with antimuscarinics (add-on dual therapy).\r\nThe different therapeutic alternatives reported could be included in a management algorithm for intractable OAB symptoms in children, but the need for prospective randomized controlled studies prior to official approbation is to be acknowledged.\r\n

Keynote Forum

Mahabaleshwar Hegde

Bharati Vidyapeeth University, India

Keynote: Distorted fatty acid metabolism and metabolic syndrome
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mahabaleshwar Hegde photo
Biography:

Mahableshwar Hegde, PhD in biochemistry, has over 30 years post garduate teaching experience, guiding M.Sc, M.Phil, PhD students at Pune University and for the
last 20 years has passionately working for omega-3 nutritional security, by establishing a “Center for Innovation in Nutrition Health and Disease (CINHD)” and “Real
World Nutrition Laboratory Foundation (RWNLF)” in Bharati Vidyapeeth (deemed to be)University Pune, to validate the innovative omega-3 enriched products throgh FLAX
BIOVILLAGE” concept devloped by him. He has published extensively and edited a book “OMEGA 3 FATTY ACID” keys to nutritional health, published by Springer International.

Abstract:

Metabolic syndrome, is a collection of risk factors that increases the chances of developing excessive body fat, heart disease,
stroke and diabetes and it is primarily the result of recent abrupt dietary life style changes, more particularly distorted
fatty acid intake. Our prehistoric food consisted of 1:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid. But today our diet has skewed
ratio of 20-40:1. Both linoleic acid omega-6 and alphalinolenic acid omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids. Excessive
omega-6 and paucity of omega-3 fatty acid is almost a global phenomenon. Th is has led to the dominance of infl ammatory
pathway in modern man and is primarily responsible in phenomenal increase in incidences and severity of chronic degenerative
diseases. Omega-3 nutritional security and lowering of intake omega-6 fatty acid, correcting the imbalance is urgent need of
the day. Th erefore, our goal has been to bring back primary essential omega-3 fatty acid, alphalinolenic acid, into the food
chain. Flax seed is the richest source of vegetarian, omega-3 fatty acid. We have developed technogies, to increase production
and productivity of fl axseed; to extract omega-3 oil and soft gel capsules from fl axseed devoid of antinutrients; to stabilize
omega-3 fatty acid in emulsion to fortify milk and milk products; omega-3 enriched poultry feed mix for the production
omega-3 enriched egg and chicken meat; omega-3 fl our mix for bakery products etc. Our pioneering eff orts, through well
researched and validated “FLAX BIO_VILLAGE” concept, aims at attaining omega-3 nutritional security and correct the
omega-6: omega-3 imbalance, to eff ectively tackle metabolic syndrome.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ze-Chun Yuan photo
Biography:

Ze-Chun Yuan is a research scientist and principal investigator at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. He is also a research professor and graduate student supervisor at the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, Canada.  He has expertise in soil microbiology, bacterial genetics and genomics with great passion in improving crop health and productivity through alternative strategies. He has been isolating and characterizing beneficial microorganisms to manage crop disease or improve crop health and productivity, in particular, developing biofertilzers and biopesticides to reduce the use of classical chemical fertilizers and pesticides in agriculture and horticulture. Dr. Yuan is also interested in developing renewable bioproducts from biomass, in particular, crop residues.  His research also involves synthetic biology and microbial engineering aiming at rewiring microbial metabolic pathways towards higher productivity of bio-based products and biochemicals. Dr. Yuan looks for opportunities for collaborative research and training of highly qualified personnel including graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.  

 

Abstract:

Chemical fertilizers and pesticides have been heavily used in agriculture and horticulture food production, resulting in serious concerns including food safety and eco-system sustainability. Plant growth promoting bacteria are able to improve plant health and productivity and reduce pathogens and diseases, representing an ecologically-friendly alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides.  We recently isolated various beneficial bacterial species including Paenibacillus polymyxa CR1 (BMC Genomics 2014;   Frontiers in Microbiology 2015;  BMC Microbiology 2016);  Bacillus velezensis strain 9D-6 (BMC Microbiology 2019);  Bacillus velezensis strain 1B-23 (GenBank Accession: NZ_CP033967.1) and Burkholderia cenocepacia CR318 (Genome Announcements 2017). These beneficial bacteria are capable of promoting crop health and inhibiting the growth of wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In particular, Bacillus velezensis strain 9D-6 and 1B-23 produce surfactin, the most powerful biosurfactant. Surfactin aids in biocontrol through its antimicrobial action and through contribution to reducing biofilm formation.  Our study further indicated that Bacillus velezensis strain 9D-6 and 1B-23 protect tomato plants from bacterial canker disease caused by Clavibacter michiganensis pv michiganensis.  Interestingly, we found strain 1B-23 produces surfactin more efficiently at temperature between 16 to 20 °C.  Our results suggest the potential of using beneficial bacteria to develop inoculants to protect agricultural important crops while reducing the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, towards more sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker  MIA Qureshi photo
Biography:

MIA Qureshi is a qualifi ed GP as well as consultant Physician in Acute Medicine. He has presented in numerous hospital grand rounds and local meetings including journal clubs. He has participated in several QIP projects and completed many audits which have helped signifi cantly in improving patient care and safety. He has also contributed towards literature by writing case reports and participation in research projects.

Abstract:

Acute confusional state is a challenging condition especially when present in young patients. I am presenting a challenging case of acute confusion in young patient which was not diagnosed in timely manner. Th irty three years old pleasant lady was initially admitted with fi ts and managed with sodium valproate. Th ere were no past medical problems. No cause was found and she was discharged with outpatient neurologist follow up. One week later she was re-admitted with confusion, bizarre behaviour and personality change. Her confusion got worse and her personality was changed to that extent that her family and other ward members including nursing staff felt about demonic possession. Th is presentation was considered secondary to sodium valproate which was changed to phenytoin. Aft erwards she went through extensive investigations including CT head, MRI head and spine, lumbar puncture, septic and autoimmune screen. Her pregnancy test was negative. LP results confi rmed leucocytosis and EEG showed diff use abnormality. MRI head and MRV were normal. CSF culture did not grow any organism. She was treated with 14 days course of IV acyclovir for encephalitis which did not help and her condition deteriorated further and she was transferred to ITU. Neurologist subsequent review advised for VGKC, NMDA, GAD and paraneoplastic antibodies. NMDA receptor antibodies result later came back positive. She had a CT TAP and TV ultrasound which ruled out any ovarian malignancy. She was treated with immunoglobins and IV steroids and her condition improved slightly however later she aspirated during fi tting and was intubated and transferred to tertiary hospital where she received plasma exchange and got almost full recovery.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ana Falcon photo
Biography:

PhD in Molecular Biology and Science PhD Award at Autonomous University, Madrid. During her scientific career, she has studied the molecular biology of several respiratory viruses of clinical significance as Influenza virus, SARS-CoV and other coronaviruses. She has worked on virus reverse genetics, functional analysis of viral and cellular proteins, molecular diagnosis of virus in clinical samples and on animal models to study viral pathogenesis. Her current research line is focused not only on the virus, but on the infected patient, and the role the contribution of virulence determinants and the patient play in the progression of the infection. To carry out these studies, she has stayed in several national and international research Centers and has collaborated with international groups and Health Institutions (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA; Center for Diseases Control, CDC, Atlanta, USA; Center for Arrhythmia Research, Michigan USA; Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Severo Ochoa Hospital, Madrid, others). She is developing and coordinating an international multidisciplinary project including physicians, microbiologists, molecular virologists and bioinformatics. She is Reviewer for several scientific journals and has trained PhD and Master students.

 

Abstract:

Influenza A virus (IAV) infection can be severe or even lethal in toddlers, the elderly and patients with certain medical conditions. Infection of apparently healthy individuals nonetheless accounts for many severe disease cases and deaths, suggesting that viruses with increased pathogenicity co-circulate with pandemic or epidemic viruses. Looking for potential virulence factors, we have identified a viral genetic determinant that contributes to infection outcome. A polymerase mutation identified in a fatal IAV case, when introduced into two different recombinant virus backbones, led to reduced defective viral genomes (DGs) production and increased pathogenesis in mice. These data provide genetic support for the association of pathogenicity and low DGs accumulation induced by mutations present in pathogenic viruses circulating in humans. Testing this association, we performed a genomic analysis of viruses isolated from a cohort of previously healthy individuals who suffered highly severe IAV infection requiring admission to Intensive Care Unit, and patients with fatal outcome who additionally showed underlying medical conditions. These viruses were compared with those isolated from a cohort of mild IAV patients. Viruses from highly severe/fatal outcome patients showed significantly fewer DGs accumulation than control viruses, suggesting that low DGs abundance constitutes a new virulence viral pathogenic marker in humans, regardless of the mutations responsible.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Allan D Boardman photo
Biography:

Allan D Boardman from the UK University of Salford is a worldwide Expert on the Global Revolution known as meta-materials that is now transforming science. He was the Co-Chair of this huge meta-material conference under the photonics Europe heading. He holds a Doctor of Science degree from the University of Durham and is responsible for 328 peer-reviewed and other publications, generating 5432 citations. He has been Topical Editor for the Journal of the Optical Society of America B for meta-materials. He is a Fellow of the SPIE and a Fellow of the Optical Society of America. He is also a Fellow of the UK Institute of Physics and the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications

Abstract:

Advanced meta-materials are now becoming popular artificial materials that can deploy complex graphene structures and uniaxial layered dielectric creations. Layered sub-wavelength systems are experimentally attractive and relatively, easily controlled compared to the classic double negative devices. New pathways for advanced meta-materials clearly involve solitons but in the nonlinear domain rogue waves deliver a dominant interest. These are shown here to lead to novel, dramatically exciting behavior. It will be shown how, in addition to meta-material controlling influence, nonlinearity and elegant magneto-optic control can be readily included, through a novel methodology based around forms of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that include stationary and non-stationary effects. It can be, often, difficult to generate the Schrodinger equation for advanced substances like hyperbolic meta-materials but the developments shown here, based upon type II hyperbolic, readily permit the investigation of both temporal and spatial solitons. Additionally, the possibility of terahertz wave amplification, based upon graphene, with inverse population of carriers in the epsilon-near-zero regime
is demonstrated. Type II meta-materials will be fully investigated with the inclusion of nonlinear, non-stationary diffraction and dispersion. Rogue waves have captured interest in a broad band of areas because of their hydrodynamic origin and here we will pursue new electromagnetic pathways. New types of soliton interaction devices will also be presented alongside this fascinating discussion of rogue waves. It will be shown that, when symmetry is an issue, the optic axis must always be in a carefully frozen position in any realistic application. It is quite dramatic that its position could overwhelm absorption. Controlled generation of high-intensity single- or multi-rogue waves will be demonstrated by induced modulation instability leading to some new broad-based applications, especially in the biological domain.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Angeline Poulon-Quintin photo
Biography:

Angeline Poulon-Quintin is an Associate Professor at the University of Bordeaux and ICMCB. She has a long experience in the correlation between process parameters, textures, microstructures and properties of structural and functional materials. Her current interests range from the search for innovative multifunctional coatings to the development of green processes to elaborate intermetallic compounds and/or nanostructured materials with innovative architecture, for applications in energy, aerospace and aeronautical industries. She is a Specialist in fine characterization with an extended recognized experience in electronic microscopy and physico-chemical techniques. She has co-authored 36 peer-reviewed articles, 40 oral presentations, 14 invited conferences and 4 patents.

Abstract:

Hard chrome plating is used by Original Equipment Manufacturer to provide sealing surface for hydraulic seals, wear resistance to moving parts and corrosion protection to a wide variety of components for aircraft. The main areas of hexachromium using processes are mechanical, automotive, aerospace and military. By improving tribological properties (superior hardness) and corrosion resistance (natural ability to react with element such as oxygen), hard chromium can lower energy consumption of moving parts and machinery, reduce the need to replace parts frequently, leading to reduce waste and improve efficiency. The hard chrome plating is a powerful, simple and cheap process. From an environmental point of view, this process itself involves the use of highly toxic substances, such Cr6+ and lead compounds The Restriction of Hazardous substances Directive (Reach) was issue, banning several toxic substances including Cr6+. Hard chromium electroplating has been also classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an environmentally unfriendly process. Now, several hard chrome plating alternatives have been developed depending on the application:1) High Velocity Oxy-Fuel thermal sprays for repairs and for the deposition of high-quality hard-metals and metals coatings, 2) Electro and electroless plates; 3) Vacuum coating, 4) Heat treatments, 5) Laser and weld coatings. Due to its complex mix of properties, no single coating will replace hexavalent chromium in all applications. In this presentation, the exploration of the potential of nanostructured coating elaborated with innovative processes, will be discuss as an efficient alternative solution for hard chromium coating replacement. The opportunity to use architecture coating will be presented. Various families of materials will illustrate the correlation between process-Nano structuration and final properties.

Keynote Forum

Dr. THILAGAVATHY GANAPATHY

Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, Al Ahsa (CON-A) King Saud bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Al Ahsa, 31982

Keynote: Quality of life in women with cervical cancer
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr.  THILAGAVATHY GANAPATHY photo
Biography:

Dr Ganapathy Thilagavathy is a nursing professor; she has more than 28 years of teaching, research experience at nursing university, supervision and administrative experience in the field of nursing education. She is working in King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences(KSAU-HS),King Abdul-Aziz Hospital, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia .She has so many publication in nursing field like, Maternal Birthing Experiences in Upright Versus Horizontal Birthing Position; A Plea for Humanized Childbirth Nightingale Nursing Times; Asymmetry in Right Vs Left Arm BP measurements among Normotensive Primigravidae.

 

Abstract:

Background: Cervical cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in developing countries. Cervical cancer is becoming one of the emerging health burdens for women hood.Quality of life (QOL) is one of the health outcomes that enable healthcare providers to better address the ongoing concerns of women with  cervicalcancer .

Objective: This exploratory study   aimed to assess the Quality of Life   among women with cervical cancer .

Methods:A cross‑sectional descriptive study using purposive  sampling recruited  n=120 women  diagnosed with cervical cancer .Using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire–core 30 (QLQ–C30) their  Quality of Life   was assessed.

Results:  The mean age  was 50.59 +4.19 years. Majority92.2% were multiparous.A vast majority of them  had poor QOL in all domains.Physical functions were affected in  (96.9%) role functions in (95.7%), cognitive in  (94.5%), emotional in  (93.8%), and financial in  (92.2%). Sexual domain was affected in (91.1%) of the patients.A significant difference observed between the  sociodemographic variables and the  health quality of life scores in all domains at   (p<0.05).

Conclusion:Severe disruptions in QOL domains occur in patients with a cervical cancer. A special care  should be provided  by the health care providers to  improve the QOL

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elizabeth Beaumont photo
Biography:

Elizabeth Beaumont, a retired transplant nurse and wildlife advocate,  is the Founder of Water for Schools. In 2015 she received a High Commendation from the Premier of Queensland for successfully campaigning an academic institution to ban the sale of water housed in polyethylene terephthalate. To date more than 80,000 bottles have been removed from circulation in favour of filtered water refill stations. Elizabeth has endorsed a children’s Book regarding the marine pollution. She actively volunteers for Surfrider Foundation, Clean Up Australia Day and has appeared on radio within her community and internationally to raise awareness about plastic pollution. 

Abstract:

Empowering Schools for Waste Free Safe Hydration during Climate Change:

Water for Schools : A Practical Model

School Children in Australia face a very hot future.  Temperatures are increasing and so does the incidents of hospital admissions and increased heat stress deaths. Description: Image may contain: cloud, sky, outdoor and nature

Figure 1

“There is strong empirical evidence indicating that climate change poses significant immediate and long term risks to the health of Australians.” Deaths associated with heat stress are now higher than deaths associated with natural disasters.  See figure 1

Source: p17,” Towards a national strategy on climate health and wellbeing for Australia discussion paper.”

The current paradigm with children attending schools in Australia is they have access to bubblers. Extreme climatic events pose challenges to each municipality and some schools are responsible for harvesting their own water. Hygiene issues will continue to escalate with up facing spigots prone to microbial growth and exposure to heat.  Bottled water is for sale in most schools at an unregulated price and housed in Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and purchased through the school canteen. This limits the dynamic physiological needs arising in children particularly in heat wave conditions.

Identifying the Problems and Potential Solutions                                                             

Water for Schools proposes to introduce a small annual affordable levy to ensure that all school children have access to safe chilled, filtered water via the installation of a system that UV purifies and safe guards water against water borne diseases, example, hepatitis, salmonella, and E coli. “ Climate change is likely to affect several other important causes of gastroenteritis in similar ways as Salmonella. “ p. 24 Bambridge et al 2008.  This is via the installation of a water filtration system that connects to the existing water supply of the school.

This increases the power of everyone to meet their dynamic needs for water.

Water for Schools works collaboratively with key stake holders and returns a portion of the levy back to Parents and Citizens associations to offset the loss of income. Water for Schools is consistent with Australian Federal Government policy.

·         Drink plenty of fluids during hot weather - cool water is best

Credit : http://conditions.health.qld.gov.au

Water for Schools is a transferrable model and operates as a legal entity.

References

https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/silentkillerreport

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-25/heat-stress-deaths-rise-following-australia-day/7113030

https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/caha/pages/40/attachments/original/1476390215/CAHA_Discussion_Paper_v04.pdf?1476390215 p.17

http://www.garnautreview.org.au/CA25734E0016A131/WebObj/03-AThreehealthoutcomes/$File/03-A%20Three%20health%20outcomes.pdf

 

Elizabeth Beaumont, a retired transplant nurse and wildlife advocate,  is the Founder of Water for Schools. In 2015 she received a High Commendation from the Premier of Queensland for successfully campaigning an academic institution to ban the sale of water housed in polyethylene terephthalate. To date more than 80,000 bottles have been removed from circulation in favour of filtered water refill stations. Elizabeth has endorsed a children’s Book regarding the marine pollution. She actively volunteers for Surfrider Foundation, Clean Up Australia Day and has appeared on radio within her community and internationally to raise awareness about plastic pollution. 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christopher Bryant photo
Biography:

Christopher Bryant has a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science (1970). He was a Professor (all three levels) of Geography, University of Waterloo, Ontario, from 1970 to 1990, Chair of the Department (1980-1983), and director of the Program for Local Development, a Canada-wide program in partnership with the Canadian Association of Economic Development, from 1984 to 1990. He was Full Professor of Geography at the Université de Montréal since 1990 and Adjunct Professor since September 2014. He is also Adjunct Professor with the School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, since September 2012. He is past Vice Chair (1996-2000) and Chair (2000-2006) of the Commission of the International Geographical Union on Sustainable Development and Rural Systems and was Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Regional Science from 1997 to 2010.
Christopher Bryant is an internationally recognized leader in research on rural areas and small towns as well as the planning and management of peri-urban agriculture in North America and Western Europe. He is one of Canada’s leaders in the adaptation of human activities to climate change and variability (CCV), notably agriculture for the last 26 years, and community resilience to CCV. One of his main preoccupations in terms of research and practice in the adaptation to CCV is how to integrate community resilience and community solidarity in the face of CCV into the long term strategic planning of such communities. He is also one of Canada's leaders in the fields of strategic planning and management, sustainable development and local and community development. His work on strategic development planning also deals with agricultural development, conservation of the environment (e.g. heritage landscapes, water resources …), and the work on community development and agricultural development as well as environmental conservation also has a strong focus on the role of citizens and a broad range of collective actors in the strategic planning process. Much of his research and interventions in the past 17 years can be labeled action research in which he has accompanied different actors from the local, through the regional and provincial levels to the federal level in Canada.
To date he has published: 113 articles in peer-reviewed journals, 172 chapters in collective works (books and conference proceedings) and 3 others in press, 32 books, edited books and monographs, as well as many reports and other publications. He has made presentations and facilitated workshops at over 550 congresses, colloquia and other events. He is currently Guest Editor for three journals: Urban Science (Special Issue: Urban Food Security); Environments (Special Issue: Agriculture and Climate Change; EchoGéo (journal of the Sorbonne, Paris, France: Special Issue: Rural Governance).
He has one of the longest records of successful research financing from the SSHRC (essentially from the beginning of the SSHRC) in Canada, as well as many other research grants or research contracts from many other agencies, including government ministries.
He has been heavily involved in community economic development since the late 1980s, having had contracts with (examples only) Employment and Immigration (on Community Futures), the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Entrepreneurship Institute of Canada (on strategic planning for single industry towns), Economic Development Canada (on exploring local economic development programs in a variety of countries to identify what can be learned for Canada), and Service Canada (on analyzing how Official Minority Linguistic Communities are dealt with in various countries), as well as with different communities across Canada (e.g. Haliburton County (ON), Fermont (QC), Hudson’s Bay (SK), and Port Hardy (B.C.)). Some activities involved training teams of citizens to organize and carry forward strategic development planning for and by the community.

Abstract:

For food security in cities and their spheres of influence, a new conceptual framework is developed, building on the FAO’s pillars of food security and the authors’ research. This framework includes: the availability of adequate food supplies for citizens; the affordability of such food for populations in need in both developing and developed countries; the production of ‘healthy’ foodstuffs, reflecting the growing market and need for such produce. The framework also includes details on the variety of conditions supportive of these dimensions. “Urban” agriculture initially focused on food production in urban agglomerations, but it has been increasingly expanded to include what used to be called ‘peri-urban’ agriculture. This reflects the reality that many examples of the former ‘urban agriculture’ have also been developed in peri-urban areas while some larger scale agricultures can also be found in an urban agglomeration which can include substantial areas of agricultural land and activities. In many urban and metropolitan centers, food is frequently produced on very small parcels of land using innovative technologies and also on roof-top food operations. Such ‘urban’ foodstuff can be sold ‘locally’ to populations in need and to well-off citizens. Developing ‘urban’ food production must contend with many stressors, e.g. climate change and variability, continued urban expansion and competition from producers elsewhere with lower production costs. Within the broad definition of ‘urban agriculture’, food production relies both on soil techniques (conventional and organic horticulture, SPIN, permaculture) as well as ‘soilless’ systems (hydroponics, aquaponics, rooftop gardens). All these issues are developed with examples from different countries’, cities and their spheres of influence. Included are some very innovative forms of food production, in which land per se is not used as the basis to grow food but where, very small spaces and new technologies can produce large quantities of food.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rola Aatif Mahmood photo
Biography:

Finished her High School attended: Khawla secondary girl’s school; 2003-2006. GPA= 99.3% Graduated from Medical university attended: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. 2006-2011 Completed internship in Salmaneya Medical Complex- Bahrain Completed Bahrain licensure exam in June 2012 Completed Saudi licensure exam in June 2012. Previous job: ultrasound specialist and patient support consultant in Abbott laboratories from September 2012 to august 2013. Current Job: Slamaniya Medical Complex- Radiology Department.

Abstract:

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of acquired disability.  It is divided into ischemic and haemorrhagic. Ischaemic strokes are devided themselves according to territory affected or the causing mechanism. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal injury in stroke is essential to target treatment.  The goals of an imaging evaluation for acute stroke are to establish a diagnosis as early as possible and to obtain accurate information about the intracranial vasculature and brain perfusion for guidance in selecting the appropriate therapy.  A comprehensive overview including the current radiological investigations and their implications will be discussed , for example:  CT angiography can depict intravascular thrombi . Diffusion-weighted MR imaging helps in detection of hyperacute ischemia.  Gradient-echo MR sequences is helpful in detecting a hemorrhage.  The status of neck and intracranial vessels can be evaluated with MR angiography, and a mismatch between findings on diffusion and perfusion MR images may be used to predict the presence of a penumbra.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christopher Bryant photo
Biography:

Christopher Bryant has a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science (1970). He was a Professor (all three levels) of Geography, University of Waterloo, Ontario, from 1970 to 1990, Chair of the Department (1980-1983), and director of the Program for Local Development, a Canada-wide program in partnership with the Canadian Association of Economic Development, from 1984 to 1990. He was Full Professor of Geography at the Université de Montréal since 1990 and Adjunct Professor since September 2014. He is also Adjunct Professor with the School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, since September 2012. He is past Vice Chair (1996-2000) and Chair (2000-2006) of the Commission of the International Geographical Union on Sustainable Development and Rural Systems and was Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Regional Science from 1997 to 2010.
Christopher Bryant is an internationally recognized leader in research on rural areas and small towns as well as the planning and management of peri-urban agriculture in North America and Western Europe. He is one of Canada’s leaders in the adaptation of human activities to climate change and variability (CCV), notably agriculture for the last 26 years, and community resilience to CCV. One of his main preoccupations in terms of research and practice in the adaptation to CCV is how to integrate community resilience and community solidarity in the face of CCV into the long term strategic planning of such communities. He is also one of Canada's leaders in the fields of strategic planning and management, sustainable development and local and community development. His work on strategic development planning also deals with agricultural development, conservation of the environment (e.g. heritage landscapes, water resources …), and the work on community development and agricultural development as well as environmental conservation also has a strong focus on the role of citizens and a broad range of collective actors in the strategic planning process. Much of his research and interventions in the past 17 years can be labeled action research in which he has accompanied different actors from the local, through the regional and provincial levels to the federal level in Canada.
To date he has published: 113 articles in peer-reviewed journals, 172 chapters in collective works (books and conference proceedings) and 3 others in press, 32 books, edited books and monographs, as well as many reports and other publications. He has made presentations and facilitated workshops at over 550 congresses, colloquia and other events. He is currently Guest Editor for three journals: Urban Science (Special Issue: Urban Food Security); Environments (Special Issue: Agriculture and Climate Change; EchoGéo (journal of the Sorbonne, Paris, France: Special Issue: Rural Governance).
He has one of the longest records of successful research financing from the SSHRC (essentially from the beginning of the SSHRC) in Canada, as well as many other research grants or research contracts from many other agencies, including government ministries.
He has been heavily involved in community economic development since the late 1980s, having had contracts with (examples only) Employment and Immigration (on Community Futures), the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Entrepreneurship Institute of Canada (on strategic planning for single industry towns), Economic Development Canada (on exploring local economic development programs in a variety of countries to identify what can be learned for Canada), and Service Canada (on analyzing
how Official Minority Linguistic Communities are dealt with in various countries), as well as with different communities across Canada (e.g. Haliburton County (ON), Fermont (QC), Hudson’s Bay (SK), and Port Hardy (B.C.)). Some activities involved training teams of citizens to organize and carry forward strategic development planning for and by the community.

Abstract:

For food security in cities and their spheres of influence, a new conceptual framework is developed, building on the FAO’s pillars of food security and the authors’ research. This framework includes: the availability of adequate food supplies for citizens; the affordability of such food for populations in need in both developing and developed countries; the production of ‘healthy’ foodstuffs, reflecting the growing market and need for such produce. The framework also includes details on the variety of conditions supportive of these dimensions. “Urban” agriculture initially focused on food production in urban agglomerations, but it has been increasingly expanded to include what used to be called ‘peri-urban’ agriculture. This reflects the reality that many examples of the former ‘urban agriculture’ have also been developed in peri-urban areas while some larger scale agricultures can also be found in an urban agglomeration which can include substantial areas of agricultural land and activities. In many urban and metropolitan centers, food is frequently produced on very small parcels of land using innovative technologies and also on roof-top food operations. Such ‘urban’ foodstuff can be sold ‘locally’ to populations in need and to well-off citizens. Developing ‘urban’ food production must contend with many stressors, e.g. climate change and variability, continued urban expansion and competition from producers elsewhere with lower production costs. Within the broad definition of ‘urban agriculture’, food production relies both on soil techniques (conventional and organic horticulture, SPIN, permaculture) as well as ‘soilless’ systems (hydroponics, aquaponics, rooftop gardens). All these issues are developed with examples from different countries’, cities and their spheres of influence. Included are some very innovative forms of food production, in which land per se is not used as the basis to grow food but where, very small spaces and new technologies can produce large quantities of food.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alicia Reyes-Arellano photo
Biography:

Alicia Reyes-Arellano studied Chemistry at Facultad de Química, UNAM in Mexico, and graduated in 1980. In 1989 she has obtained MSc degree in Organic Chemistry at ENCB, IPN in Mexico. In 1994 she has received from the Institute of Organic Chemistry of the University of Essen, Germany, the PhD in Organic Chemistry. She performed a Postdoc at the Universitat Autónoma of Barcelona, Spain in the Institute of Material Science. Later she became Investigative Group Leader at the Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas IPN in Mexico City. She worked over the years in several fields of Organic Chemistry.

Abstract:

The genus Aeromonas is constituted by waterborne gram-negative bacteria that live in aquatic environments, including ground water and chlorinated drinking water. Aeromonas caviae is a specific species considered pathogenic to humans because of causing intra- and extra-intestinal infections, and other severe illnesses, such as septicemia, wounds infection, and respiratory tract disease. The Aeromonas mechanism of pathogenicity is not yet completely understood, but what is known and studied is the significant role of biofilm-formation, undertaken by these types of bacteria. The biofilm structure is a tight association of microorganisms growing on surfaces and embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance, which exacerbates human infection, by hindering the access of antibiotics to the bacteria. Biofilm constitute an intricate interplay between physical and chemical factors, and have physiological and genetic properties such as gene transfer and gene activation through bacterial communication known as quorum sensing. The quorum sensing communication system is based on small molecules called autoinducers, which trigger biofilm formation. This small molecule signaling construct provides the target for a pharmaceutical chemistry intervention. With the design and synthesis of quorum sensing inhibitors small molecules, the bacteria communication, essential for biofilm-formation, can be blocked. As a result, the pathogenic development is dismantled and additionally the access of antibiotics is promoted. In our group we were able to design and synthesis a pilot series of 3-substituted quinoxalin-2(1H)-one derivatives as anti-quorum sensing compounds. We synthesized these compounds in a two-step synthesis path, initiated by a Grignard reaction to synthesize 2-keto ethyl ester intermediates and finalized in a second condensation step with 2, 3-diamino phenyl. Biofilm-formation was evaluated in transparent flat bottom 24 well plates with a concentration of Aeromonas caviae Sch3 of 2.0 McFarland. At 100 μM compound concentration the best quorum sensing inhibitors molecule Cpd8 reduced the biofilm-formation by 60%. At lower concentrations of 10 and 1 μM reduction of biofilm-formation was still observed. The 3-substituted quinoxalin-2(1H)-one derivatives also was tested in C. violaceum and it was confirmed the quorum sensing activity.

Keynote Forum

Nikolay PLUSNIN

FEB RAS-Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Russia

Keynote: Metal-silicon contact formation and role of the nanophase wetting layer
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nikolay PLUSNIN photo
Biography:

Nikolay Plusnin is currently the Chief Researcher in the Institute of Automation and Control Processes of FEB of the RAS (Vladivostok, Russia). He has completed his degree in Doctor of Physical-Mathematical Sciences. His research interests are in nanomaterials for electronics and their structure-phase analysis. He was a Visiting Professor in Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan). Also, he is a Member of the Advisory Board of the international journal e-journal of surface science and nanotechnology. He has published more than 60 scientific articles. His research was supported by Russian ministry of education and science, academy of sciences and government.

Nikolay Plusnin is currently the Chief Researcher in the Institute of Automation and Control Processes of FEB of the RAS (Vladivostok, Russia). He has completed his degree in Doctor of Physical-Mathematical Sciences. His research interests are in nanomaterials for electronics and their structure-phase analysis. He was a Visiting Professor in Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan). Also, he is a Member of the Advisory Board of the international journal e-journal of surface science and nanotechnology. He has published more than 60 scientific articles. His research was supported by Russian ministry of education and science, academy of sciences and government.

 

Abstract:

The result of the initial stages of the formation of a transition metal-silicon contact at room temperature has been analyzed. The contact was formed by physical vapor deposition. At the growth stage preceding the formation of the first bulk phase of the metal/silicide, a Nanophase Wetting Layer (NWL) of a metal/silicide on a silicon substrate was detected and identified. The detection and identification of NWL was made possible by the technique developed by the author for complex analysis of the structural-chemical and phase state of the surface/interface by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). In addition, this became possible to the development of the low-temperature method of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) and the formation of metal-silicon contact by this method without mixing at the interface. The detection of NWL fundamentally changed the approach to the formation of a metal contact with a silicon substrate.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rola Aatif Mahmood photo
Biography:

Finished her High School attended: Khawla secondary girl’s school; 2003-2006. GPA= 99.3% Graduated from Medical university attended: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. 2006-2011 Completed internship in  Salmaneya Medical Complex- Bahrain Completed Bahrain licensure exam in June 2012 Completed Saudi licensure exam in June 2012. Previous job: ultrasound specialist and patient support consultant in Abbott laboratories from September 2012 to august 2013. Current Job: Slamaniya Medical Complex- Radiology Department.

Abstract:

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of acquired disability.  It is divided into ischemic and haemorrhagic. Ischaemic strokes are divided themselves according to territory affected or the causing mechanism. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal injury in stroke is essential to target treatment.  The goals of an imaging evaluation for acute stroke are to establish a diagnosis as early as possible and to obtain accurate information about the intracranial vasculature and brain perfusion for guidance in selecting the appropriate therapy.  A comprehensive overview including the current radiological investigations and their implications will be discussed , for example:  CT angiography can depict intravascular thrombi . Diffusion-weighted MR imaging helps in detection of hyperacute ischemia.  Gradient-echo MR sequences is helpful in detecting a hemorrhage.  The status of neck and intracranial vessels can be evaluated with MR angiography, and a mismatch between findings on diffusion and perfusion MR images may be used to predict the presence of a penumbra.

Keynote Forum

Prem Kumar Shanmugam

CEO, The Solace Sabah Retreat

Keynote: Addictions and the family: A dual Diagnosis
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prem Kumar Shanmugam photo
Biography:

Dr Prem Kumar Shanmugam is Chairman and Clinical Director of Solace Sabah Addiction Treatment Retreat. Prem co-founded Solace with the vision of helping people with addictions recover and learn to live for life. Prem has worked in the field of addictions and psychology for more than 10 years.

Prem is the Past President of the Association of Psychotherapists and Counselors (Singapore) and the Regional Director of the Asia Pacific Certification Board (Singapore) while being one of the founding members as well. Prem is a psychologist, psychotherapist, trainer and facilitator and is actively involved in research in the addiction field.

Prem is a certified practitioner in Management of Family Violence Counseling, Certified Clinical Supervisor, Certified Substance Abuse Therapist (Level 4) and a Certified Psychotherapist and Counselor (Level 4).

Abstract:

Addiction is a disease that not only impacts the individual but the family as a whole as well. Family members tend to take on new unhealthy roles when infected with this disease in order to continue evolving as a unit and maintain homeostasis. This form of dysfunctional balance helps keep the system going while enabling the addiction to continue manifesting further.

Codependency is a concept that describes this dysfunctional relationship or behavior of supporting or enabling another individual’s addiction, unhealthy behavior, poor mental health or immaturity. Very often also known as ‘relationship addiction’, people who are codependent end up in relationships that are not only destructive to themselves but also to the other parties as well.

In these kinds of relationships, people tend to become over-dependent on each other so much for the purpose of getting their own core dependency issues met that their personal and emotional maturity is stunted from growing. As the addict continues the addiction, the codependent sacrifices his or her own needs in order to fulfill the addicts’ needs. One person needs to feel needed by sacrificing for the addicts needs while the addiction continues. They tend to continue to please people around them in order to feel important and wanted. There is this strong desire to appear perfect and good for others to approve. They have this delusional idea that as long as they can keep the important people in their life happy, their own pent up explosive emotions will go away.

This form of “dual diagnosis” is not uncommon in most families presenting with addictions. Similar to treating any other dual diagnosis or comorbid disorder, family members require specific treatment as well and this paper discusses how this is achieved employing a biopsychosociospiritual approach.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Adam H Khan photo
Biography:

Adam Khan is Founder and CEO of AKHAN Semiconductor. He has authored several patents and technical publications, and is also a frequent speaker on Diamond Semiconductor and Clean Technology. As a result of his award-winning research, which he began as an Electrical Engineering student at age 19, he is co-inventor of the Miraj Diamond™ Platform. He has served as a Speaker and Expert Witness to a variety of Federal bodies, including the US House Space, Science and Technology Committee and the US Department of Energy. Most recently, his work was recognized and individually honored by the United States Congress in the 114th Congressional Records and Proceedings. He earned his BS in Electrical Engineering and Physics from the University of Illinois Chicago, before pursuing graduate research at Stanford University. He has been everything from a Forbes 30 under 30 honoree, to a CleanTech Open Midwest Innovation Summit winner

Abstract:

Diamond is a well-known material that commands many excellent characteristics including great hardness, high thermal
conductivity, high-optical transparency, and excellent chemical stability. In this work, we study the practical and economical
usage of Nanocyrstalline Diamond (NCD) as a fi rst surface in an anti-reflective coating upon a traditional substrate.Using
measured index of refraction and extinction coeffi cient values, multi-layer coating solutions for diff erent spectral regions such as the visible or infrared wavelengths were developed using OpenFilters optical design soft ware.Th e simulation results from
OpenFilters soft ware indicate comparable transmissivity and refl ectivity performance to known solutions while providing 
enhanced mechanical properties such as improved breakage and scratch performance and resistance to impact from airborne
particles. Pioneering work on low temperature, high quality diamond deposition methods by AKHAN Semiconductor Inc. has
opened the doors for the use of diamond in a wide variety of optical applications. It is shown that Nanocrystalline Diamond
(NCD) coatings with grain size of 10-100 nm can signifi cantly enhance the breakage, scratch performance and hydrophobicity
of glass displays and lenses. With Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) device integration now possible utilizing nanocrystalline diamond on a wide variety of optical substrates, new opportunities are now possible for the next
generation of optical sensing technologies.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marcello Ciaccio photo
Biography:

Marcello Ciaccio is full Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology at the University of Palermo. Currently, he is the Director of the Unit of Laboratory Medicine at the University Hospital of Palermo. His experimental work has been focused on the clinical validation of new biomarkers in several conditions, including diabetes, neurodegeneration, endocrinopathies.

Abstract:

Background: Glycated Albumin (GA) has been suggested as an additional or alternative biomarker that can circumvent some
of the limitation of HbA1c. The much shorter half-lives of albumin compared to hemoglobin makes it more responsive to
changes in glycemic status. Moreover, GA shows a stronger correlation with continuous glucose measurement over one to two
days than HbA1c, so it may reflect glycemic variability and glucose excursions more accurately. Although GA represents a
promising biomarker for the evaluation of glycemic status in both experimental and clinical settings, its introduction in clinical
practice requires further validation in relation to basic interpretative criteria and diagnostic accuracy.
Objectives: The objectives are to define reference limit of GA with a direct approach and to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of GA
in predicting diabetes in asymptomatic subjects at risk of suffering from diabetes.
Methods: One thousand thirty-four consecutive blood donors were recruited for reference range definition. Asymptomatic
subjects at risk for diabetes were recruited for diagnostic accuracy study. GA was measured by an enzymatic-colorimetric method.
Results: The calculated GA URL in blood donors was 14.5% (95% CI: 14.3–14.7). Among subjects at risk of diabetes, GA
median levels were 13.2% (IQR: 12.2–14.4). Eighteen subjects (5.4%) were classified as diabetics based on their HbA1c. GA was
significantly correlated with HbA1c (r=0.31; P<0.0001). According to ROC curve analysis, GA identified subjects with diabetes
with a sensitivity of 72.2% (95% CI: 46.5–90.3) and a specificity of 71.8% (95% CI: 66.5–76.7) (AUC: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.75–0.84;
P<0.0001) at the cut-off of 14%.
Conclusion: The knowledge of GA distribution in Healthy subjects is essential to promote its introduction in both research and
clinical practice. GA can also be considered a useful biomarker of glycemic status that can predict diabetes with high accuracy.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Freddie Ann Hoffman photo
Biography:

Freddie Ann Hoffman, MD founded HeteroGeneity in 2003; a Washington, DC-based consultancy focused on complex natural products, and is also its Managing Member. She has over 35 years of product development experience. She has a BS in chemistry from UCLA and received her MD and General Pediatric Residency training from the University of California at Davis. She completed a fellowship in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), staying on to direct the Nutrition and Supportive Care Section of the Division of Cancer Treatment, and later, as Director of Extramural Clinical Trials of the Biological Response
Modifiers Program. Leaving NCI in 1986, she served at FDA for nearly 14 years, as Chief of the Cytokines, Growth Factors and Oncologic Products Branch of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, and later as Deputy Director of the Medicine Staff in the Office of the Commissioner. During her tenure, she formed and chaired an internal FDA Botanical Working Group which developed the botanical drug guidance, which the agency finalized in 2004. She also served in the Office of Dietary Supplements at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, before moving to the private sector in 1999, joining Warner-Lambert Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, where she was Senior Medical Director for New Product Development. She continues to serve on numerous working groups, task forces, and boards of both government agencies and private companies. She has chaired and participated in numerous scientific, regulatory and policy forums addressing the development of polymolecular drugs and development of complex product. In 2014, she was an invited speaker at the 18th Presidential Commission on Bioethics (BRAIN initiative). She is a member of the American Society of Pharmacognosy and a past chair of the Drug Information Association’s Natural Health Products Track.

Abstract:

Medicinal use of plant-based products has its origins in antiquity estimated to date back at least 60,000 years. Today approximately 80% of the world’s population continues to utilize plants and plant products to treat or prevent clinical conditions. In the United States, plant-based medicines were a major part of pharmaceutical armamentarium that is up until the passage of the US Drug amendments of 1962. The drug amendments further established requirements for new drug approval in the US, specifically requiring that the US Food and Drug Administration must affirm the safety and efficacy of a new drug prior to market approval. It was not until FDA’s dissemination of its Botanical Drug Development Guidance document, several decades later, that the US development of botanicals as drugs has experienced resurgence. At present there are two FDAapproved new botanical drugs that are sold exclusively by prescription in the US. This session will discuss how the FDA defines a botanical and the implications of the US regulatory approach on the development and approval of this renewed drug category, along with some of the lingering hurdles to this special category of new drugs.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alex R Khomutov photo
Biography:

Alex R.Khomutov principle investigator, Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow, Russia. He graduated Chemical Faculty of Moscow State University in 1976. He got PhD and later D.Sc. degrees in Bioorganic Chemistry in Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. The main field of the interests are design and synthesis of the inhibitors/unnatural substrates of the enzymes of amino acids metabolism, including those related to biosynthesis and catabolism of biogenic polyamines spermine and spermidine, and investigation of the interaction of these analogues with enzymes and activity in cell cultures. In 2017 he was a chair of Polyamines Gordon Research Conference. A.R.Khomutov is a co-author of more than 120 papers in per-reviewed Journals.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The polyamines, spermidine (1,8-diamino-4-azaoctane, Spd) and spermine (1,12- diamino-4,9-diazadodecane, Spm) are ubiquitous organic polycations present in all eukaryotic cells in µM-mM concentrations and involved in the regulation of numerous vital processes including the differentiation and growth of cells1. Disturbances of polyamines metabolism are associated with the development of many diseases, including malignant tumors, decreased immune response, some types of pancreatitis, Snyder-Robinson's syndrome, and even type 2 diabetes1. Biological evaluation of rationally designed polyamine analogs is one of the cornerstones of polyamine research having obvious basic and practical values. Here we synthesized and characterized C-methylated Spm and Spd analogues possessing a biochemically useful set of properties. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The synthesis of title compounds was performed using known methods starting from amino alcohols by subsequent elongation of polyamine backbone, or using convergent synthesis in the case of bis-methylated Spm derivatives2. Findings: Obtained data demonstrated that the biochemical properties of C-methylated polyamine analogs can be regulated by changing the position of the methyl substituent, and at more precise level by changing the configuration of chiral center2-4. Hidden stereospecificity (natural substrates are achiral) was shown for the enzymes of polyamine metabolism using title compounds2. An original approach to alter stereospecificity of FAD-dependent N-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) and to alter stereospecificity and regioselectivity of yeast polyamine oxidase (Fms1) was suggested2,4. Conclusion & Significance: The first metabolically stable functionally active mimetics of Spd, i.e. (R)-1,8-diamino-3-methyl-4-azaoctane and Spm, i.e. (R,R)-2,13-diamino-5,10- diazatetradecane, being suitable for the investigation of the individual cellular functions of partly interchangeable and easily interconvertible Spm and Spd were found2,3.

 

Keynote Forum

Irdina Drljevic

Medical Faculty University of Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Keynote: Small-diameter melanomas: clinical-dermoscopic challenge in early diagnosis
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Irdina Drljevic photo
Biography:

Irdina Drljevic is currently employed at the “Private Dermatology and Venereology Practice - Dr. Drljevic” in Sarajevo and at the Department of Public and Preventive Health and Infectious Diseases of the Medical Faculty and  School of Health Care University of  Zenica, where she was awarded the title of Assoc. Professor in 2011, and  Professor in 2017. In 2008 she completed a respectable International School of Dermoscopy at the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Austria, under the guidance of esteemed professors Peter Soyer and Giuseeppe Argenziano, and a year later she was educated in a class led by professor Harald Kittler in Viena, Austria. She was a visiting lecturer at several plenary conferences and symposiums on dermatology in the Region of  SI Europe,  and in Bosnia and Herzegovina. She is one of the founders and the first vicepresident of the Balkans Association of Dermoscopy (BAD) active since 2011, where she has been engaged as a licensed lecturer of the BAD. Dr. Drljevic is the first and current President of the Dermoscopy Association of B&H established in 2011. In December 2013, in the capacity of the President of the Organization Committee of the First Winter School of Dermoscopy with International Participation, she made a large contribution in education of specialists dermatologists, plastic surgeons, family medicine doctors and others.

 

Abstract:

Abstract

Background: Melanoma is a leading cause of death from skin diseases due to potentially lethal nature. Thus, early diagnosis of melanoma cannot be overemphasized because thin melanomas have an excellent prognosis. Special difficulties in early detection of melanoma lie in melanocytic lesions whose diameter is below 6 mm, hypo-pigmented and non-pigmented lesions, and regular and rather clearly defined papular and nodular lesions regardless of their color (differential  diagnosis: desmoplastic melanoma, Spitz nevus, Blue nevus). Briefly, there are many reasons to miss the diagnosis of small-diameter melanoma, particularly because melanoma is an excellent imitator of benign skin tumors. On the other hand, we can always use clinical, well-known ABCDE acronym for small-diameter melanomas and the dermoscopy as an additional diagnostic test often prevents the application and questions the “excellence” of known dermoscopic algorithms.

Aim: Emphasize and pay attention to this diagnostic challenge in everyday clinical and dermoscopic practice.

Method: We have demonstrated several interesting clinical-dermoscopic cases of patho-histologically verified melanoma with the diameter below 6 mm, including a rare naevoid malignant melanoma. We analyzed gender, age, anatomic localization, dermoscopic structures and patho-histological parameters, especially in terms of prognostic factors.

Conclusions: In order to recognize very small melanoma total body skin examination (TBSE) needs to be performed, detailed family and personal anamnesis needs to be obtained, the clinical ABCDE acronym is to be followed as much as possible and the classical algorithm, so called pattern analysis, should be applied in dermoscopic analysis of a suspicious lesion. Timely diagnosis and excision of the suspicious lesion with pathohistological verification are crucial for the prognosis, i.e. patient’s survival.

Recent Publications:

1        Drljevic I. Face melanoma and dermoscopy including differential diagnosis. IV Congress of Dermatovenerologists of Mecedonia with international participation. Ohrid, Macedonia,2009.

2        Drljevic I.  Risk of a second cutaneous primary melanoma and basal cell carcinoma in patients with a previous primary diagnosisof melanoma: true impact of dermoscopy follow-up in the identification of high-risk persons. Serbian Jornal od Dermatology and Venereology. 2010; 2 (4): 146-148.

3        Drljevic I. Dermoscopy of head melanoma-case studies and review of references. Our Dermatology Online Journal. 2012; 3(2): 123-125.

4        Bandic J, Dobrosavljevic D, Drljevic I. et sur. Double coparison of teledermoscopy: Interobserver variability and relation to histpathology. Abstracts from the 3rd World Congress of Dermoscopy, May 17 to 19, 2012, Brisbane, Australia. Dermatol Pract Conc. 2012; 2 (2 suppl):16

5        Drljevic I. Melanoma malignum and basal cell carcinoma. Skin cancer of the skin-case reports of skin tumors. Our Dermatology Online Journal. 2014; 35-36.

6        Drljevic I. Superficial spreading and nodular melanoma. Skin cancer of the skin-case reports of skin tumors. Our Dermatology Online Journal. 2014; 50-52.

7        Drljevic I. Supeficial spreading melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Skin cancer of the skin-case reports of skin tumors. Our Dermatology Online Journal. 2014.

8        Drljevic I, Bjeloševic E, Denjalic A, Drljevic K. Melanocytic lesions and dermoscopy in childhood: diagnosis, therapy and foloving. Our Dermatol Online. 2016; 7(1): 97-100.

 

Keynote Forum

Desiree de Waal

University of Vermont Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Medical Nutrition therapy delays dialysis and improves biomarkers
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Desiree de Waal  photo
Biography:

Desiree joined the Nephrology Team at the University of Vermont Medical Center in 2002. She is a member of the dialysis team and started the Medical Nutrition Therapy Clinic in 2003. She has coordinated multiple investigational trials and recently completed her own research on Medical Nutrition Therapy improving CKD outcomes. Desiree was awarded the Dietitian of the Year Award in Vermont (2013) and Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2014). She participates in Evidence Analysis Projects and a member of the Evidenced- Based Practice Committee. She is the Editor of the Peer Reviewed Newsletter “Renal Nutrition Forum”.

Abstract:

As kidney disease progresses, altered nutrition biomarkers are observed which may be related to poor dietary habits. The typical North American diet is low in fruits, vegetables and whole grains high in protein and processed foods which can affect the balance of the body’s electrolytes, minerals and contributes to the uremic environment of the digestive system. Evolving evidence has found a link between the gut and kidney health suggesting a need for emphasis on nutrition for the care of a patient with compromised kidney function. Recently a 10 year retrospective study was recently published in the Journal of Renal Nutrition demonstrating that the decline in kidney function was less in patients who received Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) at follow-up compared to those not receiving MNT. The participants who received MNT were less likely to start dialysis and had more favorable biomarkers. Albumin and biomarkers of chronic kidney disease- mineral and bone disorder were more likely to be within normal limits in the MNT group. The kidney diet is one of the most challenging obstacles patients face. Diet is often entrenched as part of a person’s lifestyle and they do not feel an immediate negative physical response with poor diet choices. With costs of kidney disease rising, it seems prudent to recommend a therapy that has been shown to delay the progression of kidney disease and improve biomarkers.

Keynote Forum

Marios Smyrnaios

Sapcorda Services GmbH, Berlin, Germany

Keynote: Modelling and characterization of GNSS multipath effects via a novel approach
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marios Smyrnaios photo
Biography:

Marios Smyrnaios studied geomatics in Athens and geodesy in Berlin. He holds a PhD in the field of satellite-based navigation from the university of Hannover. He is currently working at Sapcorda Services GmbH as a GNSS systems engineer in the framework of the development of a high precision GNSS correction service. His research interests include satellite navigation, positioning with pseudolites, GNSS signal processing, multipath and high precision GNSS correction solutions.

 

Abstract:

In the last decades many advances have been made in modeling the different error sources that are biasing GNSS signals and reduce the positioning accuracy. One of the last remaining non-modeled error source in GNSS, in terms of a standard correction model, is multipath. Multipath related biases occur when apart from the direct signal, indirect signal components reach also the receiving antenna. The major contribution of this work is the formulation of closed-form expressions for the characterization of multipath effects present in the GNSS data. A dedicated algorithm is developed which evaluates the before mentioned expressions and is further used in a simulation analysis. Key parameters of the process are simulated and their impact on the resulting error magnitude is characterized. For the validation of the theoretical developments as well as of the developed algorithm a controlled experiment is performed and results will be presented together with a comparison between real and simulated data.  Thus, it will be demonstrated that multipath signatures present in the data can be replicated for complete satellite arcs with this new approach. The concept can be used for quantifying and characterize multipath effects either for positioning or for GNSS remote sensing applications.

 

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker David Michael Parish photo
Biography:

David M Parish Staff Scientist in Protective & Marine Division at Sherwin Williams Company Staff Scientist at Glatfelter, Chillicothe, OH. Sean Zuckerman, Ph.D. (2013): Case Western Reserve University, and Nivasu Venkata Muram, Ph.D. (2012). Ohio State University – BS (Organic Chemistry), 1986 Collaborators & Other Affiliations-Horst von Recum, PhD (Biomedical Engineering, Case); Patrick Ziemer (Corporate Polymers Group, Sherwin Williams (SHW)); Andrew Taylor, PhD (Lead Scientist-UK, SHW); Petra Allef, PhD (Innovation, Evonik); Thomas Klotzbach, PhD (Senior Lab Manager-Additives & Silicone Resins, Evonik); Gerald L. Witucki, (Assoc. Scientist, Dow Corning); Maria Nargiello, PhD, (Technical Director, Evonik).

Abstract:

A new resin matrix has been developed that is primarily silicone based but also has hexaacrylate alkene functionality. It reacts through aerobic redox polymerization rapidly, to provide a polymer that is chemical resistant, heat resistant, flexible, and can act as a carrier for insulation materials, which performs as sprayable insulation. This resin can also act as a new NISO product, as the level of acrylate and silicone, allow for high resistance to UV degradation and is polymerized as the process indicates above. This can also be used as a precursor for emulsion polymerization. The material can be fed simultaneously with other monomers, protective colloids, initiators, etc. to create a water-based silicone acrylate polymer. A patent has been filed and is pending on this chemistry.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shinichiro Akiyama photo
Biography:

Shinichiro Akiyama currently is General Director of the Saisei Mirai Clinic in Tokyo, Japan. He had been a fellow in oncology at Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine. This led to clarify intracellular TNF as a resistant factor by chemotherapeutic agents. He joined the Cancer Immune Cell Therapy Center of Kudan Clinic in 2009. There he had applied cancer gene profiling as therapeutic effect of peptide-pulsed dendritic cell therapy. He was selected as “Featured Global Expert Cancer Researcher of Marquis Who\'s Who” in 2015.

Abstract:

Recently immunotherapy has become an attractive new strategy in the treatment of cancer, boosting the patient\'s own immune system to eradicate cancer cells. The toxicities of immunotherapy for cancer are as diverse as the type of treatments that have been devised. Immune surveillance by macrophage is critical for the immune integrity since invertebrates has evolved and is imposed through an intricate armory of functions that can infiltrate into tumors tissue. Oral colostrum macrophage-activating factor (MAF) produced from bovine colostrum derived vitamin D binding proteinhas shown high macrophage phagocytic activity as well as anti-tumor activities. Oral colostrum MAF stimulates macrophage whereas its precious mechanism has not yet been understood. It is administered orally in an acid-resistant enteric capsule to activate macrophages in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and as a powder in the mouth to activate macrophages in the lymphoid tissue of the Waldeyer\'s tonsillar ring. In terms of practical clinical use, oral colostrum MAF has certain advantages over MAF produced from serum because it is derived from bovine colostrum and it is administered orally and sub-lingually instead of injection. We propose that oral colostrum MAF and MAF produced from serum could demonstrate a greater immunotherapeutic activity than that of serum MAF alone. We have also treated cancer patients with oral colostrum MAF in combination with cancer gene therapy and/or NK cell therapy so as to induce higher potential benefit of solid cancer therapy.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Nita Shah photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Jamal Tazi

university of Montpellier and ABIVAX-CNRS cooperative laboratory

Keynote: THE ANTI-HIV CANDIDATE ABX464 DAMPENS INTESTINAL INFLAMMATION BY TRIGGERING IL22 PRODUCTION IN ACTIVATED MACROPHAGES
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jamal Tazi photo
Biography:

Jamal Tazi is professor of functional genomics at the University of Montpellier and deputy director of the health center biology " Rabelais" responsible for education and training. For 20 years , he led the team " messenger RNA metabolism in metazoans " within the Institute for Molecular Genetics in Montpellier ( IGMM ) where he made important contributions to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the expression of our genes and editing of their products.These discoveries are used today in the medical field through the development of a new therapy based on the use of small molecules to fight against viral infections.To ensure the transition between basic and applied research, and also to support these innovative projects to clinical stage , Jamal founded in 2008 the company Splicos and established its partnership with public institutions as a cooperative laboratory where, he became the scientific Director

Abstract:

The progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with mucosal damage in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This damage enables bacterial translocation from the gut and leads to subsequent inflammation. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-treatment) is an established animal model for experimental colitis that was recently shown to recapitulate the link between GI-tract damage and pathogenic features of SIV infection. The current study tested the protective properties of ABX464, a first-in-class anti-HIV drug candidate that has demonstrated anti-viral activity in HIV treatment of naïve patients. ABX464 also induced a long-lasting control of the viral load in HIV infected humanized mice after treatment arrest. ABX464 treatment strongly attenuated DSS-induced colitis in mice and produced a long-term protection against prolonged DSS-exposure after drug cessation. Consistently, ABX464 reduced the colonic production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF as well as that of the chemoattractant MCP-1. However, RNA profiling analysis revealed the capacity of ABX464 to induce the expression of IL-22, a cytokine involved in colitis tissue repair both in DSS-treated mice. A comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles by RNAseq demonstrated that the expression of IL22 was preferentially induced by ABX464 in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages only upon stimulation with LPS.  Importantly, anti-IL22 antibodies abrogated the protective effect of ABX464 on colitis in DSS-treated mice.

Because reduced IL-22 production in the gut mucosa is an established factor of HIV and DSS-induced immunopathogenesis, our data suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of ABX464 warrant exploration in both HIV and inflammatory ulcerative colitis (UC) disease.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kurt R Karst photo
Biography:

Abstract:

The biosimilars industry in the United States is still a nascent one, but hopefully not for long. In 2015, FDA approved the first biosimilars biological product, and several applications for other biosimilar biological products are pending at the agency. Although FDA and industry are tackling the scientific and data requirements for FDA to approve a so-called “Section 351(k) application” for a biosimilar biological product, legal issues abound. Whether it is the requirements or the contours of the “Patent Dance” for resolving patent disputes between biosimilars applicants and reference product sponsors, the availability and the scope of 12-year reference product exclusivity, or the appropriate naming convention for biological products, each issue is critical to the success of biosimilars in the United States and to the future of the industry. And with fast-paced litigation, the landscape for biosimilars seems to change on a monthly or weekly basis. This session will explore the ins and outs of current disputes involving the metes and bounds of the patent dance, non-patent exclusivity, naming and more, and explain what each dispute might mean for the future world of United States Biosimilars. The biosimilars industry in the United States is still a nascent one, but hopefully not for long. In 2015, FDA approved the first biosimilars biological product, and several applications for other biosimilar biological products are pending at the agency. Although FDA and industry are tackling the scientific and data requirements for FDA to approve a so-called “Section 351(k) application” for a biosimilar biological product, legal issues abound. Whether it is the requirements or the contours of the “Patent Dance” for resolving patent disputes between biosimilars applicants and reference product sponsors, the availability and the scope of 12-year reference product exclusivity, or the appropriate naming convention for biological products, each issue is critical to the success of biosimilars in the United States and to the future of the industry. And with fast-paced litigation, the landscape for biosimilars seems to change on a monthly or weekly basis. This session will explore the ins and outs of current disputes involving the metes and bounds of the patent dance, non-patent exclusivity, naming and more, and explain what each dispute might mean for the future world of United States Biosimilars. 

Keynote Forum

Muhammad Ajmal Zahid

Kuwait University, Kuwait

Keynote: Dr.
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Muhammad Ajmal Zahid  photo
Biography:

Dr Zahid got his pre-medical education from Paharang, Faisalabad and obtained a Medical degree from King Edward Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan. He became a member, Royal College of Psychiatrists, UK, in 1985. He served as Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, King Edward Medical College during 1986-1992; joined the Department of Psychiatry, Kuwait University in 1994, which he has Chaired since 2006. His areas of interest include Psychosomatic disorders, Violence against Medical Staff, and Psychotic Disorders. He has authored more than 35 publications in peer-reviewed, indexed, International journals and organized 11 International conferences. He is the recipient of a number of Research and Academic awards and author of two scales measuring Violence against medical staff and Somatic symptoms in the Psychologically distressed medical outpatients. He has made over 40 presentations in various International Conferences.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: An extensive number of patients going to the essential wellbeing facilities experience the ill effects of the co-dismal mental issue.

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of the comorbidity between common mental disorders (anxiety/depression/somatization) and common chronic physical illnesses among primary health care attendees and explore the relationship of comorbidity with the type of illness and socio-demographic characteristics.

Method: The Physical Health Questionnaires (PHQ-SADs) were directed to a randomized example of 1046 essential center participants in all the five governorates of the nation over a 5-month time frame. Physical diagnoses were ascertained by the attending physicians based on ICD-10 criteria.

Results: Of 1046 respondents, 442 (42.25%) had no less than one mental issue, while 670 (64.1%) had a physical ailment determination, viz: diabetes mellitus (37.01%), hypertension (34.18%), heart infections (7.2%) and non-chronic physical illnesses (9.4%). Physical comorbidity was significantly associated with older age, divorce, illiteracy, and poorer living conditions.34.4% (360/1046) had physical-mental comorbidity while 53.7% (670) % had physical-mental comorbidity; and of 376 without physical disease, 82 (21.8%) had no less than one mental issue (OR = 4.1, P < 0.001). The commonest comorbid mental disorders were somatization and the simultaneous presence of all 3 mental disorders. There was an increase in the prevalence of mental disorders with an increase in the number of physical illnesses, and increase in psychopathology scores with a number of physical comorbidities. Subjects with heart diseases and asthma consistently had higher psychopathology scores.

Conclusion: The findings call for the primary care physicians to be sensitive to the psychosocial context of patients who present primarily with physical conditions; more so for patients with multiple medical illnesses and social disadvantage.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yared Mulat Tefera photo
Biography:

Yared Mulat Tefera has completed his PhD from Haramaya University specializing in Soil Science. He is the Member of Natural Resource Management in the Department in Hawassa University Wondo Gent College of Forestry. He has published one paper in reputed journals and has been serving as Lecturer, Researcher and Secretary in the Department of Natural Resource Management.

 

Abstract:

Understanding and assessing soil organic carbon stock (SOCS) within the framework of greenhouse gas emissions and land degradation is crucial in combating climate change and enhancing ecological restoration. The goal of this study was to quantify the current SOCS of major land use types in Kersa Sub-Watershed, Eastern Ethiopia. Replicated soil samples from 0–20, 20–40, and 40–60 cm depth were collected from three major land use types: grazing, cultivated, and fallow lands. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare means and Pearson correlation analysis was used to see relationships between selected soil parameters. The results of the study revealed significant (P≤0.05) difference in SOCS under the different land use types. Soil under grazing land use type had significantly higher SOCS (42.9 t/ha and 32.9 t/ha) than the cultivated (32.6 t/ha and 26.3 t/ha) and fallow (23 t/ha and 12.5 t/ha) land use types in the surface and subsurface layers, respectively. Soil organic carbon stock decreased with soil depth in all the land use types and showed positive and significant correlation (P≤0.05) with clay content, while it was negatively and significantly correlated with bulk density. The results show the potential contribution of vegetation cover as a land use to enhance soil organic carbon sequestration and environmental protection.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rathod AP  photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Anis Rahman

President/CTO, Applied Research & Photonics, Inc., USA

Keynote: Terahertz imaging of human tissue for cellular level diagnosis
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anis Rahman photo
Biography:

Dr. Anis Rahman is an acclaimed scientist for metrology. He is a winner of many scientific awards including NASA Nanotech Brief’s Nano-50” award twice; CLEO/Laser Focus World’s “Innovation award;” and “2015 MP Corrosion Innovation of the Year,” by the NACE. Anis is the founder of Applied Research & Photonics (ARP), a leading terahertz metrology company located in Harrisburg, PA (see http://arphotonics.net). His invention of “Dendrimer Dipole Excitation,” a new mechanism for terahertz generation, makes it possible to generate high power terahertz radiation. With sub-nanometer resolution, terahertz metrology offers tremendous savings in time and cost for semiconductor process development.

Abstract:

TBA

 International Conference Keynote Speaker K. Gillerman*, A. Kulkarni, A. Shah, A. Gudi, R. Homburg photo
Biography:

Karin Gillerman obtained her training (LAc, BSc with honor) from the Israeli college of integrative medicine 1998. She specialized in TCM for women health and gynecology and further specialized in acupuncture to support IVF and infertility (PCOM, NY). She practices acupuncture in the UK (NHS and private fertility clinics) and leads a RCT at the HUH. She teaches and lectures worldwide and participated as a speaker in international medical conferences. Her unique approach is to integrate acupuncture with western medicine as to support fertility treatments and improve their outcome.

Abstract:

Clinical trials assessing benefits of acupuncture on IVF have differed in study design, protocol, outcome measures and commercial bias. This heterogeneity precluding firm conclusion regarding the efficacy of acupuncture in this field. To address this, international acupuncturists experienced treating women during IVF participated in Delphi questionnaires and reached a consensus protocol to be used in future research (Smith et al 2012). This was the first study to use this agreed standard protocol.

This was an RCT, in which 157 women were randomised to receive either acupuncture treatment three times in the treatment cycle in addition to our standard IVF protocol (n=79) or no acupuncture treatment (n=78 ). All women in the study were undergoing their 1st or 2nd IVF cycle, were 23-43 years old with BMI<30. Those randomised to the study group (n=79) received acupuncture based on the Delphi consensus protocol, between days 6-8 of ovarian stimulation and twice on the day of embryo transfer before and after transfer. The IVF practitioner was blinded to the randomisation. The primary end point was live birth.

15/79 women in the intervention group withdrew from the study (did not complete the acupuncture treatment or had cancelled cycles) compared to 9/78 women from the control group (P <0.001). A per-protocol analysis revealed that the rate of live births (27/64, 42% vs 11/69, 15.94% P=0.03) and positive pregnancy tests (34/64, 53% vs 19/69, 27.53% ,) were significantly higher in the acupuncture group compared with the control group (p<0.005).

The results of this study imply that acupuncture may be offered as a possible method of improving IVF outcome. This study was the first to follow a widely approved consensus protocol hoping to settle disagreement in the literature and resolve previous disparity.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Diana Anderson photo
Biography:

Diana Anderson holds the Established Chair in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Bradford. She has 450+ peer-reviewed papers, nine books, has successfully supervised 29 PhDs, and has been a Member of Editorial Boards of 10 international journals. She has been or is Editor in Chief of a book series on toxicology for J Wiley and Sons and the Royal Society of Chemistry respectively. She gives key note addresses at various international meetings. She is a Consultant for many
international organisations, such as the WHO, NATO, TWAS, UNIDO and the OECD. Her h index =54.

Abstract:

Detection tests have been developed for many cancers, but there is no single test to identify cancer in general. We have
developed such an assay. In this modified patented Comet assay, we investigated peripheral lymphocytes of 208 individuals:
20 melanoma, 34 colon cancer, four lung cancer patients, 18 suspect melanoma, 28 polyposis, 10 COPD patients and 94 healthy
volunteers. The natural logarithm of the Olive tail moment was plotted for exposure to UVA through different agar depths
for each of the above groups and analysed using a repeated measures regression model. Response patterns for cancer patients
formed a plateau after treating with UVA where intensity varied with different agar depths. In comparison, response patterns
for healthy individuals returned towards control values and for pre/suspected cancers were intermediate with less of a plateau.
All cancers tested, exhibited comparable responses. Analyses of receiver operating characteristic curves, of mean log Olive
tail moments, for all cancers plus pre/suspected-cancer versus controls gave a value for the area under the curve of 0.87; for
cancer versus pre/suspected-cancer plus controls the value was 0.89; and for cancer alone versus controls alone (excluding pre/
suspected-cancer), the value was 0.93. By varying the threshold for test positivity, its sensitivity or specificity can approach 100% whilst maintaining acceptable complementary measures. Evidence presented indicates that this modified assay shows
promise as both a stand-alone test and as a possible adjunct to other investigative procedures, as part of detection programmes
for a range of cancers.

Keynote Forum

Habibullo I Abdussamatov

Habibullo I Abdussamatov, Pulkovo observatory of the RAS, Russia

Keynote: Cosmic rays and clouds variations effect on the climate is insignificantly
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Habibullo I Abdussamatov photo
Biography:

Habibullo I Abdussamatov is the Head of the Space Research Laboratory at the Pulkovo Observatory and head of the Russian-Ukrainian project Astrometria on the Russian Segment of the International Space Station. He holds two patents for scientific inventions and is the author of more than 160 scientific publications.

 

Abstract:

Cosmic rays and clouds variations effect on the climate is insignificantly It is believed that an increase in the area of the cloud cover in the lower atmosphere of the Earth, presumably caused by grows of the galactic cosmic rays flux in the period of the Grand minimum of solar activity, leads to an increase the reflected portion of the TSI back into space, and by that, to a cooling of the climate down to the Little Ice Age. However, without any reason, this hypothesis totally ignores the influence of the quasi-bicentennial variation of TSI of some ~0.4% and all the changes in the physical processes in the atmosphere, which are due to by growth of the cloud cover. Also at all is not taken into account the reverse aspect of the simultaneous increase in the reflection of the thermal radiation of the Earth's surface and the solar radiation reflected from it by due to the increase of the cloud cover area. Now suppose that the area of the cloud cover of the Earth's surface has increased by 2%. An estimate of the grows cloud cover in the lower atmosphere by 2% leads:

  • to a decrease of the energy budget of the Earth Eo on -0.02•79 Wm-2 = –1.58 Wm-2;
  • to an increase of Eo on +0.02•40 Wm-2 = +0.8 Wm-2;
  • to an increase of Eo on +0.02•23.5 Wm-2 = +0.47 Wm-2;
  • to an increase of Eo (the greenhouse effect ) on +x.xx Wm-2;
  • to a decrease of Eo (emitted by clouds into space) on -0.02•30 Wm-2 = -0.6 Wm-2;
  • to an increase of Eo (emitted by clouds to surface) on +0.02•30 Wm-2 = +0.6 Wm-2.

New E1 ≈ Eo - 1.58 Wm-2 + 0.8 Wm-2 + 0.47 Wm-2 + x.xx Wm-2 - 0.6 Wm-2 + 0.6 Wm-2.

Thus, E1 – Eo ≈ 0  or maybe E1 – Eo >0, what can lead to warming. An inverse aspect of simultaneously an increase in the reflection of the thermal radiation of the Earth surface and of the solar radiation reflected from it, as well as the significant amplification of the greenhouse effect practically compensates of this cooling by means of accumulation of energy. The impact of an increase in the area of the cloud cover, presumably caused by the growth of the cosmic rays flux,  on climate is practically absent.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arjun Panesar; Charlotte Summers photo
Biography:

Abstract:

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Erin Ramachandran photo
Biography:

Erin Ramachandran is a published author of Mental Health Strong, A Christian’s Guide to Walking Resiliently alongside Your Spouse with a Mental Health Condition. Erin holds a master’s degree in Health Care Administration and is a certified Mental Health First Aid USA instructor. She has worked in the healthcare industry for more than fifteen years and is the Mental Health & Wellness Program Director at one of the largest non-profit health plans in the United States. Outside of work, Erin enjoys traveling, swimming, mentoring, and watching movies. She is passionate about helping marriages affected by mental health challenges. Her and her husband, Keith live in Southern California and have been married for twelve years.

Abstract:

Do you feel hopeless, tired, and worn out? How do we walk alongside our loved ones when they are driving us crazy? We tend to talk about cancer and diabetes in our relationships but rarely talk about depression, anxiety, PTSD, etc. How do we learn how to love well and also how to not burn out? Provided from the perspective of a spouse whose partner battles multiple mental health conditions, Erin offers reallife, faith-based, practical examples to maintain a healthy relationship. She has tried over fifty resources and simplifies what works in eight effective steps to walking resiliently alongside her spouse with a mental health condition. These steps can be applied to any relationship where you have a loved one with a mental health condition that you are trying to walk alongside with including a spouse, a parent/ child, brother / sister or friend. Walk away with new tools in your toolkit, apply them to your relationship and have hope again as you learn how to be Mental Health Strong

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vivian John Crowhurst photo
Biography:

This method has been prepared to support human development therapies. The Cognitive Image Profiling method was created by Vivian John Crowhurst, an English psychic artist. His knowledge of the human psyche was acquired through courses with Jane Duncan and Philip Rogers, who in turn were students of Louise Hay. Avid reader on issues of justice and love.

 

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

En Bing Lin

Central Michigan University, USA

Keynote: Big data analysis in bioinformatics
 International Conference Keynote Speaker En Bing Lin photo
Biography:

En-Bing Lin is a Professor of Mathematics at Central Michigan University, USA. He has been associated with several institutions including Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of California, Riverside, University of Toledo, UCLA, and University of Illinois at Chicago. He has received his PhD from Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include Data Analysis, Applied and Computational Mathematics, and Mathematical Physics. He has Supervised a number of graduate and undergraduate students. He serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals. He has organized several special sessions at regional IEEE conferences and many other professional meetings.

Abstract:

With the increasing use of advanced technology and the exploding amount of data in bioinformatics, it is imperative to introduce effective and efficient methods to handle Big data using the distributed and parallel computing technologies. Big data analytics can examine large data sets, analyze and correlate genomic and proteomic information. In this presentation, we begin with an overview of Big data and Big data analytics, we then address several challenging and important tasks in bioinformatics such as analyzing coding, noncoding regions and finding similarities for coding and noncoding regions as well as many other issues. We further study mutual information-based gene or feature selection method where features are wavelet-based; the bootstrap techniques employed to obtain an accurate estimate of the mutual information and other new methods to analyze data. Given the multi-scale structure of most biological data, several methods will be presented to achieve improvements in the quality of mathematical or statistical analysis of such data. In a DNA strand, it is essential to find sequences, which can be transcribed to complementary parts of the DNA strand. We will mention several methods to identify protein coding regions. We also use some special variance and entropy to analyze similarities among coding and noncoding regions of several DNA sequences respectively and compare the resulting data. We will address the use of big data analytics in many phases of the bioinformatics analysis pipeline.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Julia Gerasimenko photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Novel approaches in combating pancreatitis and development of pancreatic cancer.

Julia Gerasimenko1, Oleksiy Gryshchenko2, Shuang Peng1, Oleg Gerasimenko1, Ole H Petersen1.

1Cardiff School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, Wales, UK; 2Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, 4 Bogomoletz Street, Kyiv, 01024, Ukraine.

 

Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a dangerous and in up to 5% of cases deadly disease with no specific cure. The leading causes of acute pancreatitis have been identified as gallstone biliary disease and high alcohol intake, while abnormality in calcium signalling in pancreatic acinar cells (PACs) was found to be one of the first events.

We have shown previously that bile acids and non-oxidative alcohol metabolites elicit excessive Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Subsequent intracellular Ca2+ store depletion activates the opening of Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in the plasma membrane leading to Ca2+overload, premature activation of pancreatic pro-enzymes, digesting the pancreas and its surroundings.

Our recent work using a pancreatic lobule preparation allowed us to investigate potential role for pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) in AP. AP often results in development of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increased occurrence of pancreatic cancer (PC). The most common form of PC is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and CP patients are at significant risk of developing PC. Activation of PSCs - during pancreatic injury - induces proliferation as well as secretion of extracellular matrix components, thereby playing an important role in the fibrosis that occurs in CP and PC.

PSCs generate substantial Ca2+ signals when challenged with both physiologically and pathologically relevant bradykinin (BK) concentrations by activation via bradykinin receptor type 2 (B2). The major plateau phase of these signals can be markedly reduced by CRAC channel inhibition and, importantly, blockade of PSCs B2 markedly diminishes the extent of acinar necrosis evoked by AP-inducing agents.

Our study indicates that combined treatment of pancreatitis with inhibitors of CRAC channels and B2 receptors could be potentially useful against development of PC. This study is beneficial for understanding of new mechanisms that could help combatting AP, transition to CP and development of PC.

References:

Gerasimenko et al. (2011) Calmodulin protects against alcohol-induced pancreatic trypsinogen activation elicited via Ca2+ release through IP3 receptors. PNAS, 108(14):5873-5878.

Gerasimenko et al. (2013) Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channel blockade as a potential tool in antipancreatitis therapy. PNAS, 110(32):13186-13191

Gerasimenko et al. (2014) The role of Ca2+ in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis. J Physiol. 592(2):269-280.

Gryshchenko et al. (2016) Ca2+ signals mediated by bradykinin type 2 receptors in normal pancreatic stellate cells can be inhibited by specific Ca2+ channel blockade. J Physiol. 594(2):281-293.

Ferdek PE, Jakubowska MA, Gerasimenko JV, Gerasimenko OV, Petersen OH (2016) J Physiol.  594(21):6147-6164.

Jakubowska MA, Ferdek PE, Gerasimenko OV, Gerasimenko JV, Petersen OH. 2016 Nitric oxide signals are interlinked with calcium signals in normal pancreatic stellate cells upon oxidative stress and inflammation. Open Biol. 2016 6(8). pii: 160149.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Martin. Landenberger photo
Biography:

Martin Landenberger Specialist in General Medicine and expert in New Ways in Cancer Therapy - Part 1 and Cancer therapy: one-on-one talk with Dr. Ing. Med. Martin Landenberger Specialist in general medicine, naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, sports medicine and spa doctor The goal of my therapy is not the suppression of symptoms (lowering of blood pressure with medication, pain suppression) but the influence of metabolic processes in the form that symptoms can be made to disappear again. This requires an interest in healthy living and active cooperation.

Abstract:

The role of aromatic (AAA) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in maintaining health in senior years- helpful, practical therapies. Aromatic amino acids as substrate for the fast stress hormon adrenaline (as well for the hormones thyroxine, melanine and insuline) are essential for the memory, thinking, concentration and stress capability, but as well for avoiding diabetes II and cancer as well as maintenance of the immune system. Branched-chain amino acids make up for one third of the muscles, are necessary for all proteins, detoxification of muscles as well as source of energy in the muscles. Some cancers show decreased levels of branched chain amino acids. The uptake of these amino acids can be guaranteed by selected nutritions, defined amino acid supplements and specially designed amino acid infusions.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sierra Olson photo
Biography:

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a double-stranded DNA virus with carcinogenic properties directly linked with cervical abnormalities and cancer. It is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. There are many different strains of HPV. The most virulent strains linked to the majority of cervical dysplasia include HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.22

 

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Akos Mesterhazy

Cereal Research non-profit Ltd, Hungary

Keynote: Food security and food safety can secure together the survival of mankind
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Akos Mesterhazy photo
Biography:

Professor Akos Mesterhazy completed  his PhD at the age of 34 from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS) (1979). He was elected to full member of the HAS in 2013. He is now research professor at the Cereal Research non-profit Ltd. He published more than 60 paper in highly reputed Internations Journals with more than 3000 citations. He is serving as an editorial board member of repute for two journals.

 

Abstract:

Food security was very much stressed, but much less the food safety caused by toxigenic fungi. Toxin contaminated grains has much less or no value. We need the beside the amount of food and feed that they are non toxic. Economic lossed In goes for billions in dollars, in Hungary the 2014 maize sufferd about 300 million USD. The research clarified in maize an wheat that the most important toxin regulating agent is the resistance in both plants. In wheat the resistance to different Fusarium spp. is common, so testing F. graminearum resistance is enough. But this is  in maize mostly independent, they need independent tests. The tested pathogens in maize: F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and Aspergillus flavus. More than ten time differences in resistance in commercial cultivars and hybrids were found. About 10-15 % of the hybrids shows good resistance to all species, most are very differring. Besides resistance the measurement of toxins is inevitable. This makes possible to screen wheat and maize for resistance ti toxigenic fungi. As a result susceptible and very susceptible genotypes should not be registered or should be withdrawn fom production. We did not find yield penalty for highly resistant varieties. So their combination with a consequent breeding work is without compromises possible. The breeding phylosophy therefore needs to be updated to correspond to the new challanges both for human food and animal feed safety. I think the the yield maximalization without food safety should be over.

 

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alphajour Ahmed Bah III photo
Biography:

Alphajour Ahmed Bah III has his expertise in developing, implementing, mentoring, verifying, validating, coaching, teaching, and executing Industrial Technologies, Quality Management Systems, Food Safety, Lean & Regulatory Affairs in the food manufacturing, dietary supplements, vitamin, and nutritional industries for more than 25 plus years. A highly qualified Senior Executive with several fortune 500 companies in the US and International. Certified in multiple areas of food science, quality, food safety, and regulatory affairs that utilize quality, food safety, and regulatory affairs to fuel the growth of the companies and develop strategies, design, initiative and organizational efficiencies and effectiveness thorough best in class QMS, Food Safety and Regulatory Affairs. A proven PM with cross functionalities in Organizational Leadership, Change Managements, and Operations management. His proven approach value- diversity that is approachable to all stakeholders from Farm to the Table and Mouths of Consumer’s and Customers.

 

 

Abstract:

This dissertation explores the socioeconomic impacts of the food industries; the performance of their programs which are modeled as stand alone or integrated programs to reach all aspects of their processes and systems.  It all begins with Good Agricultural Practices with Sanitation Operations as the foundation of all programs.  Food Manufacturers need to provide a platform to highlight emerging and innovative science and technology into their quality, food safety and regulatory processes, systems and programs.  Failure to protect the safety of food can lead to the decline in consumer confidence and threaten the economic vitality of not only the food production manufacturers but also the worldwide agricultural business.  Food safety refers to the conditions and practices to prevent contamination and foodborne illnesses.  Food contamination can occur during inadequate cooking, packaging process or storage.  The production and processing of food may have varying degrees of susceptibility to contamination.  These stages of the process are the “critical points”, which are generally the points of observation by the public authorities and extreme vigilance by food manufactures.  Foodborne illnesses affect individuals physically and businesses economically.  Being that food safety is an increasingly important public health issue, it is imperative that governments intensify their efforts to improve food safety.  These efforts should be in response to an increasing number of food safety programs and rising consumer concerns.  A large portion of food safety websites are either government regulated or overseen but there also a few that are completely independent.  We are seeing a lot of improvements in all facets of the operation in food production but still lot of work to be done. Interpretation of FSMA consistently is critical. FSMA is still in its Teenage stage. Do you agree and Why?

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wei Chen photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Clemens Esche

Beautiful Skin Institute PLLC, USA

Keynote: Acne scar reduction: What is new?
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Clemens Esche photo
Biography:

Clemens Esche is a board-certified dermatologist who graduated from The Johns Hopkins dermatology program and held assistant professor appointments at the University of Pittsburgh, the Mayo Clinic and at The Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Esche founded The Beautiful Skin Institute PLLC in Herndon, VA, in 2016. He has received more than 10 academic awards for his pioneering research and has authored more than 70 publications. He was recognized with the Patient’s Choice Award in 2013 and became the National Winner of the Doctor’s Choice Award in 2014 and again in 2015. Dr. Esche treats adult, pediatric and cosmetic patients and specializes in minimally invasive cosmetic procedures with little to zero downtime.

Abstract:

Inflammation is the single greatest reason for acne scar development. Consequently, the extent of scarring is associated with acne severity and delay in treatment. Each scar is different and therefore requires a customized approach. Acne scars are currently classified into 3 different types: (i) atrophic, (ii) hypertrophic and (iii) keloidal. A net destruction of collagen in the dermis results in atrophic scarring. It can be further classified as ice-pick (narrow and deep, 60%), boxcar (1.5-4 mm wide, 25%) or rolling (15%). Less commonly, there is a net gain of collagen that results in hypertrophic or keloidal scars. Ice-pick (deep pit) scars are frequently the most severe, and, unfortunately, represent around 2/3 of cases. Fraxel or CO2 laser treatment have been considered the gold standard until recently. However, fractional radiofrequency and also the Chemical Reconstruction of Skin Scars (CROSS) technique tend to be superior to even the most advanced fractional laser for the treatment of ice pick and deep scarring. They also tend to work well for boxcar and deep rolling scars. Four treatments at monthly intervals will serve
many patients well. An added benefit is the shorter recovery time compared with Fraxel laser. TCA CROSS involves a highstrength
TCA peel (50-100%) applied to the base of the scar to ablate the epithelial wall and to promote dermal remodeling. The degree of clinical improvement is proportional to the number of sessions. Hypertrophic and keloidal scars can be injected with corticosteroids, 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin or verapamil. Alternatives include silicone dressings and cryotherapy. Freezing from within with cryoshape is advocated periodically. Numerous 2017 publications challenge the cosmetic procedural delay following oral isotretinoin therapy. An algorithmic approach summarizes the updated recommendations.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Katheryn Fernandez photo
Biography:

Abstract:

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohamed El Far photo
Biography:

Mohamed El Far worked in Biochemistry field for 40 years, published over 90 peer-reviewed papers. He received Fullbright and British Council fellowships several times as well as German DAAD Grant to establish PDT Program at Munchen; he also received US-AID grant to establish PDT unit in Egypt. He is serving on the editorial boards and is Hon. Editor to three international journals. He acts as UNESCO Expert in science and technology. He served as Visiting Professor to University of California as well as Utah Laser Center and also Mayo Clinic for several years. He also served as a Visiting Professor to Cardiff and Swansea Universities, UK. He is a Member of International Photodynamic Association and Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. He is selected recently as expert and consultant for biochemistry in the National Committee of Supreme Council of Universities in Egypt; which is the highest nation honor.

Abstract:

Lecture will review our potential long term team experience over more than 35 years in this field. Presentation will address present current state of art of using PDT in the treatment of certain types of cancers, experimentally and clinically. It covers a variety of topics related to the uses, for the first time, natural photosensitizers as tumor localizers in PDT of certain types of tumors, bio-distribution and selective in vivo tumor localization of endogenous porphyrins induced and stimulated by 5-ALA as a developed technique in our laboratories and its clinical applications, synthesis and in vivo biological evaluation of some newly developed 5-ALA derivatives and porphyrins, the uses of not only laser in PDT of tumors but also halogen lamps as a source of light in tumor PDT, and our clinical application of PDT of tumors in Egypt.

Break: /

Keynote Forum

Michael Skutek

Diakovere Annastift, Hannover, Germany

Keynote: Total hip arthroplasty in obese patients. Prevention of surgical site infections
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Skutek photo
Biography:

Michael Skutek, MD gathered expertise as an orthopedic surgeon in prevention and detection of surgical site infections both during his fellowship (Canada) and in daily life practice in an academic orthopedic center (Germany). His viewpoint combines the academic angle as well as experience as a practicing surgeon with >200 joint replacements per year. His research focuses on optimizing treatment and preventing of complications. Knowledge of potential risk factors and straight forward performance is a key to reduce SSI in obese and morbidly obese patients.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: There is an increasing number of both total hip replacement and related SSI, especially in obese and morbidly obese patients. We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in this entity. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach using an iodized foil following skin disinfection and generous irrigation using a water lavage during the procedure. Standard postoperative protocols were applied. Operating room time, incidence of infections as well as other potential complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, the applied procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity in terms of prevention of surgical site infections are being discussed.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jerzy Leszek photo
Biography:

Jerzy Leszek is full professor of psychiatry at the Medical University in Wroclaw, Poland , vice-director of the Psychiatry Department and head of Alzheimer’s Disease Laboratory. He is author and co-author more than 210 papers(especially from old age psychiatry), a lot of chapters to the books published in reputed Polish and international journals and serving as an editorial board member of several journals. He is Scientific Editor and co-author of first Polish academic handbook on Alzheimer’s disease and twenty another academic books from psychogeriatry poblished in Poland , European countries and in USA . He is member a lot of scientific associations eg. funder and president of Lower Silesian Association of Alzheimer’s Families, first of its kind in Poland and Former Member of Board of Directions of International Psychogeriatric Association(IPA). His Research area includes nanomaterial’s and nanotechnology in complex biochemical environment of the central nervous system.

Abstract:

Background: Nanoneurotechnology, an emerging technology of manipulating atoms and molecules at nano-scale to be able to have special and enhanced properties in terms of physical and chemical behaviors, has been demonstrating the great capabilities of developing drug carrier for overcoming blood brain barrier. Dementia of Alzheimer’s type (AD) affects memory, thinking and behavior. Scientists believe that changes in the brain may begin 10-20 years before symptoms appear and AD is diagnosed. The need to diagnose and treat the devastating disease at an early stage is critical to manage and treat AD. Unfortunately, the lack of valid biomarkers limits the possibility of the earlier stages of Alzheimer’s disease. The advance of nanotechnology could offer huge opportunities in early-stage diagnosis and well-treatment of AD.

 

Methods: This presentation discusses the challenges of current treatment, diagnosis of AD and development on biocompatible nanoparticles and provides the rational and potential of using nanoparticles for both drug carrier and imaging contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment of AD.

 

Results: Biocompatible nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 1-100 nm could be used as target delivery system for drugs e.g., rivastigmine to overcome blood brain barrier (BBB) and to minimize the side effects caused by over-dosage. In addition, biocompatible nanomaterials with enhanced optical and magnetic properties may allow them being excellent alternative contrast agents for early-stage diagnosis.

 

Limitations: The limit knowledge of biocompatibility of nanomaterials may inhibit the development of nanotechnology for diagnosis and treatment for AD.

 

Conclusion: With more studies on using nanomaterials and nanotechnology in complex biochemical environment of the central nervous system, it is most likely that nanomaterials and nanoneurotechnology can give significant impact on the early-stage diagnosis and treatment of AD. According to personal experiences, the author of this presentation discusses the application of new class of nanoparticles like dendrimers to the treatment and early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

Keynote Forum

Alexandr Urusov

Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.

Keynote: Lateral flow test system for non-invasive determination of adenovirus
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alexandr Urusov photo
Biography:

Alexandr Urusov has completed his PhD in A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry of the Russian Acad. Sci. He is the head of the group of bioanalytical systems in Research Center of Biotechnology of the Russian Acad. Sci. He has published 36 papers in reputed journals focused on different aspects of immunochemical interactions and features of immunodetection for compounds important for medicine and food safety.

Abstract:

Adenoviral infection is a very common viral disease. Its clinical manifestations include lesions of the respiratory system or the gastrointestinal tract. Main techniques used for the detection of adenovirus are ELISA and PCR. They are effective, but time-consuming, require highly skilled specialists and expensive equipment. These limitations are overcoming by immunochromatographic assay. The aim of the presented study was to create an test for rapid detection of adenovirus in stool samples.

Monoclonal antibodies A46 (Artron, Canada) were selected based on a comparison of 12 antibody preparations from different manufacturers. Gold nanoparticles (38 ± 3 nm) are chosen as a marker which provides high staining intensity and high capacity of immunoglobulins sorption. Conjugates of the nanoparticles with antibodies were characterized by dynamic light scattering and demonstrated the average diameter of 65 ± 6 nm. Immune reactivity of immobilized antibodies was confirmed.The formed set of reactants was used to prepare multimembrane immunochromatograpic composites. The CNPC-15 membrane (MDI, India) was chosen as the optimal working membrane. It simultaneously gives a high specific coloration and acceptable speed of sample movement. The prepared test strips were checked for adenovirus control in stool samples. To eliminate non-specific binding, the addition of Tween-20 and BSA to the working was proposed; their optimal concentrations were chosen.The required sensitivity of 30 ng/ml is confirmed. The short time of the assay (10 min) and simple point-of-care assessment of the obtained results provide competitive advantages of the developed tests for clinical diagnostics.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fatma Al-Abri photo
Biography:

Fatma Al-Abri received her BSc degree in Marine Science and Fisheries from Sultan Qaboos University in May 2004, Oman. She has worked as an Assistant Researcher at the Center of Excellence in Marine Biotechnology - Sultan Qaboos University since December 2011. She is highly involved in research interest with aquaculture and aquaponics. She had served as Specialist Fish Wealth Development at Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries Before joining SQU, from 2009 to 2011. She has attended several national and international conference, symposiums, trainings and organized national workshops and conference.

Abstract:

Aquaponics is the combination of fish production (aquaculture) with the soil-less production of plants (hydroponics). It operates within a closed-loop system and utilizes minimal resources. Fish feed provides most of the nutrients required for healthy plant growth. These nutrients, excreted directly by the fish, or generated by the microbial breakdown of organic wastes, are absorbed by growing plants. Nutrient removal by the plants in turn treats the water by removing nitrogenous compounds, such as dissolved ammonia, which are harmful to fish. Water is then re-oxygenated and returned to the fish tanks. Fresh, potable water is added to the system, as necessary to replace evaporative loss. In 2010, a report was published by a group of scientists from Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth for the combined production of tomatoes and red hybrid tilapia. This research had support from the Agricultural and Fisheries Development Fund (MoAFW). Various types of salad crops have been grow with Nile tilipa in aquaponics system in climate-controlled greenhouse. This paper describes the testing of an aquaponics system using floating rafts. In this system the plants are grown in small coir pots and receive their necessary minerals from the fish tank via the water which circulates around their exposed roots beneath floating Styrofoam rafts. This paper reports the productivity of fish and plant crops, measures of the release and uptake of minerals and the results of microbial tests on produce.

Keynote Forum

Tarek El-Kerdani,

Director, University of Florida, USA

Keynote: A systematic approach for full mouth rehabilitation
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tarek El-Kerdani, photo
Biography:

El-Kerdani joined the faculty of the UF College of Dentistry in 2010. A Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics, El-Kerdani earned his dental degree in 1985 and certificate in restorative dentistry in 1989, both from Cairo University in Cairo, Egypt. In 1994 he received a certificate in prosthodontics and in 1996 his master’s in dentistry from the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) in Indianapolis. He taught at IUSD, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry in Detroit, and Misr International University in Cairo before joining UF

Abstract:

This presentation discusses a systematic approach for full mouth rehabilitation for patients with loss of inter-occlusal space due to attrition. Attrition of the dentition can negatively affect esthetics and function. When reconstructing patients with attrition who require restoration at increased occlusal vertical dimension (OVD), it is necessary to first evaluate the OVD using a removable interim prosthesis to ensure that the patient will tolerate the new position. The transition to fixed interim prostheses has to be carefully planned to achieve the desired OVD. One approach is to prepare all teeth in a single day and place full-arch interim prostheses; however, this can be tiring for the patient and prosthodontist. An alternative approach is to prepare one arch and place interim prostheses, while using composite resin in the opposing arch to maintain the newly established OVD. A diagnostic wax-up at the proposed OVD is completed and duplicated in stone. A vacuum form matrix is loaded with composite resin and applied to the unprepared etched teeth of the opposing arch to restore form and occlusion until full contour interim prostheses are placed at a later visit. After that step the occlusion is permanently restored with ceramic and metal ceramic restoration as planned.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Benfang	Lei photo
Biography:

Benfang Lei has completed his PhD from University of Houston, Texas and postdoctoral study at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH at Hamilton, Montana. He is an Associate Professor at Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University. He has published 70 primary research papers and has been serving as an academic editor of PloS One and an editorial board member of Infection and Immunity.
 

Abstract:

Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes common pharyngitis and occasional severe invasive infections. There is a significant knowledge gap on why noninvasive upper respiratory GAS infections usually do not result in lower respiratory infections while certain GAS strains can cause pneumonia and how invasive GAS disseminates systemically. A pulmonary murine infection model is used to address these questions.  Paryngeal GAS isolates induced robust neutrophil recruitment and was effectively cleared in a NADPH Oxidase-dependent mechansim by neutrophils. In contrast, invasive isolates with mutations in virulence regulators CovRS and/or RopB inhibited neutrophil recruitment and caused pulmonary infections.  Natural GAS RopB mutants caused infection only in the alveolar region whereas  natural CovS and RopB double GAS mutants invade the perivascular interstitium, disrupts smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the blood vessels, and penetrates into the lumen of endothelial layer and the systemic circulation.  Correction of the CovS mutation abolished the capacity of GAS to invade the vascular system. To identify virulecence factors that are critical for GAS innate immune evasion and vascular invasion, we tested single and double deletion mutants of CovRS-controlled virulence genes of hypervirulent GAS. Only a surface protein was found to be critical for the vascular invasion, and the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment requires both streptolysin S and the platelet-activating factor acetyl hydroslase Sse.  Thus, Streptolysin S- and Sse-dependent evasion of neutrophil response is critical for the capacity of GAS to cause pulmonary infection, and GAS invasion of the vascular system requires the surface protein.Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes common pharyngitis and occasional severe invasive infections. There is a significant knowledge gap on why noninvasive upper respiratory GAS infections usually do not result in lower respiratory infections while certain GAS strains can cause pneumonia and how invasive GAS disseminates systemically. A pulmonary murine infection model is used to address these questions.  Paryngeal GAS isolates induced robust neutrophil recruitment and was effectively cleared in a NADPH Oxidase-dependent mechansim by neutrophils. In contrast, invasive isolates with mutations in virulence regulators CovRS and/or RopB inhibited neutrophil recruitment and caused pulmonary infections.  Natural GAS RopB mutants caused infection only in the alveolar region whereas  natural CovS and RopB double GAS mutants invade the perivascular interstitium, disrupts smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the blood vessels, and penetrates into the lumen of endothelial layer and the systemic circulation.  Correction of the CovS mutation abolished the capacity of GAS to invade the vascular system. To identify virulecence factors that are critical for GAS innate immune evasion and vascular invasion, we tested single and double deletion mutants of CovRS-controlled virulence genes of hypervirulent GAS. Only a surface protein was found to be critical for the vascular invasion, and the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment requires both streptolysin S and the platelet-activating factor acetyl hydroslase Sse.  Thus, Streptolysin S- and Sse-dependent evasion of neutrophil response is critical for the capacity of GAS to cause pulmonary infection, and GAS invasion of the vascular system requires the surface protein.Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes common pharyngitis and occasional severe invasive infections. There is a significant knowledge gap on why noninvasive upper respiratory GAS infections usually do not result in lower respiratory infections while certain GAS strains can cause pneumonia and how invasive GAS disseminates systemically. A pulmonary murine infection model is used to address these questions.  Paryngeal GAS isolates induced robust neutrophil recruitment and was effectively cleared in a NADPH Oxidase-dependent mechansim by neutrophils. In contrast, invasive isolates with mutations in virulence regulators CovRS and/or RopB inhibited neutrophil recruitment and caused pulmonary infections.  Natural GAS RopB mutants caused infection only in the alveolar region whereas  natural CovS and RopB double GAS mutants invade the perivascular interstitium, disrupts smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the blood vessels, and penetrates into the lumen of endothelial layer and the systemic circulation.  Correction of the CovS mutation abolished the capacity of GAS to invade the vascular system. To identify virulecence factors that are critical for GAS innate immune evasion and vascular invasion, we tested single and double deletion mutants of CovRS-controlled virulence genes of hypervirulent GAS. Only a surface protein was found to be critical for the vascular invasion, and the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment requires both streptolysin S and the platelet-activating factor acetyl hydroslase Sse.  Thus, Streptolysin S- and Sse-dependent evasion of neutrophil response is critical for the capacity of GAS to cause pulmonary infection, and GAS invasion of the vascular system requires the surface protein.Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes common pharyngitis and occasional severe invasive infections. There is a significant knowledge gap on why noninvasive upper respiratory GAS infections usually do not result in lower respiratory infections while certain GAS strains can cause pneumonia and how invasive GAS disseminates systemically. A pulmonary murine infection model is used to address these questions.  Paryngeal GAS isolates induced robust neutrophil recruitment and was effectively cleared in a NADPH Oxidase-dependent mechansim by neutrophils. In contrast, invasive isolates with mutations in virulence regulators CovRS and/or RopB inhibited neutrophil recruitment and caused pulmonary infections.  Natural GAS RopB mutants caused infection only in the alveolar region whereas  natural CovS and RopB double GAS mutants invade the perivascular interstitium, disrupts smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the blood vessels, and penetrates into the lumen of endothelial layer and the systemic circulation.  Correction of the CovS mutation abolished the capacity of GAS to invade the vascular system. To identify virulecence factors that are critical for GAS innate immune evasion and vascular invasion, we tested single and double deletion mutants of CovRS-controlled virulence genes of hypervirulent GAS. Only a surface protein was found to be critical for the vascular invasion, and the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment requires both streptolysin S and the platelet-activating factor acetyl hydroslase Sse.  Thus, Streptolysin S- and Sse-dependent evasion of neutrophil response is critical for the capacity of GAS to cause pulmonary infection, and GAS invasion of the vascular system requires the surface protein.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Matthew B. Carroll, MD, FACP, FACR photo
Biography:

Matthew B. Carroll is a board certified Rheumatologist who is clinically active and currently employed by the Singing River Health System.  He has had a passion for clinical research and has been an active member of the growing research team at his community hospital.  He retired from the United States Air Force in 2017 but during his active duty service developed over 15 protocols and has published over 20 articles.  A recent passion has been exploring the possible beneficial role of IL-6 blockade on acute myocardial infarction.  He launched an ambitious protocol studying the short term effects on major adverse cardiac events which though it was eventually ended after futility analysis suggested no benefit, did enroll over 20 subjects and provided 180 day follow-up of data collection.  He continues to actively lobby the study of IL-6 blockade in other areas of Cardiology.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Tocilizumab (TCZ) is an important biologic response modifier that Rheumatologists routinely employ in the treatment of several systemic autoimmune diseases. TCZ binds to interleukin (IL)-6 receptors, inhibits cellular activation, and mitigates inflammation by IL-6. In mid-2017 TCZ was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its first non-rheumatologic condition, the treatment of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell-induced severe or life-threatening cytokine release syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older. With this approval and with the increasing use of TCZ off-label for other nonrheumatologic conditions such as Castleman’s Disease and its variant TAFRO syndrome, where else might TCZ be successfully utilized as treatment? Recently interesting data has been published regarding possible use of TCZ in the treatment of myocardial infarction.  This review will focus on the role of IL-6 and it’s receptor in myocardial inflammation and association with adverse clinical outcomes. Discussed are results from one animal study and two human trials have been published that studied the effect of TCZ in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Finally, this review summarizes the current data and makes recommendations for future clinical trial development in what hopefully will be a promising application of TCZ for a serious non-rheumatologic condition.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tiffany Kelley photo
Biography:

Dr. Tiffany Kelley is the Founder and CEO of Nightingale Apps LLC and iCare Nursing Solutions LLC. Nightingale Apps began with  Know My Patient ®, a patent-pending mobile application designed to provide nurses with patient information at their fingertips while on their patient care unit. Her second company, iCare Nursing Solutions LLC, provides consulting and education services to healthcare organizations and nursing informatics professionals in need of health IT and/or informatics solutions to address their daily operational needs. Dr. Kelley is the author of Electronic Health Records for Quality Nursing and Health Care. She has served on the BOD for AMIA and currently a Director for ANA Mass. Kelley earned her Ph.D. from Duke University, her MS and MBA from Northeastern University and BSN from Georgetown University. Dr. Kelley was recently awarded the Smart Health award for Excellence in Healthcare Innovation in 2018. 

 

Abstract:

Nurses are dependent upon data and information in their delivery of daily care to patients. Yet many do not realize that data and information are essential to the nursing process (e.g., assessing, diagnosing, planning, intervening and evaluating). In recent years, our healthcare environments have continued to introduce new clinical information systems that digitalize the data and information needed for patient care. With such systems, new challenges have presented themselves to nurses and healthcare professionals. One of these challenges is the ability to access, enter, store, retrieve, exchange and evaluate data while on the go. Nurses currently rely on pieces of paper to temporarily store the data and information they need for care each day.  The pieces of paper are not part of the patient’s medical record and are variable depending upon the nurse. With advancements in technology, we now have smartphone devices that are small enough to be portable in a nurse’s pocket. With such devices, software applications can be designed to address the data and information needs of nurses delivering care. Such applications will require interoperability with other clinical information systems to maintain a source of truth with the patient’s health record. Interoperability is a word used to describe the ability to exchange data between two or more systems. The term is often discussed in more technically oriented environments. Yet, the impact of such technical improvements will be essential for nurses in clinical care environments to strive toward continued improvements in the delivery of direct patient care.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Olurominiyi Ibitayo photo
Biography:

Olurominiyi Ibitayo is a Professor in the School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. He has received his PhD in Public Administration from Arizona State University in 1994. His research interests and publications include environmental and occupational risk assessment, use and misuse of agricultural pesticides, neighborhood-level research and emergency management. His publications have appeared in a diverse set of reputable journals including Risk Analysis, Journal of Hazardous Materials, Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy and Hort Science among others

Abstract:

The high population growth rate (three percent) for Sub-Sahara Africa is particularly ominous regarding food needs if the rapid rate of movement of people from rural areas, the site of food production, to urban areas is considered. In view of the need for self-sufficiency in food production, and the expansion of export agriculture, several countries in sub-Sahara Africa have been aggressively promoting the use of agricultural inputs such as pesticides. Agricultural pesticides are, however poisons by design as these chemicals are intended for use in destroying any pest that may interfere with the production or the processing of agricultural products. The capacity of pesticides to destroy is however not limited to pests but may result in serious risks to human health and to the environment. The incidence of occupational agricultural pesticide poisoning or contamination is particularly high in developing countries. In contrast to the zero-risk approach this paper suggests a mix of options for reducing agricultural pesticide poisoning in sub-Sahara Africa; pesticide risk communication and education programs, providing government subsidy for the purchase of less toxic but usually more expensive pesticides; discontinuing calendar-based pesticide application; limiting the importation of highly toxic agricultural pesticides; and encouraging the use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Krishnan Venagaragava Chary photo
Biography:

Dr. Krishnan Vengadaragava Chary: Did his post graduation from prestigious Stanley Medical College . He is an eminent pharmacologist , well known for his teaching skills in college  and PG entrance coaching . He has won many prizes including a best poster in IPS conference at Bangalore. He is research coordinator of Saveetha Medical College and consultant for few ethics committee and contract research organization at Chennai. He has five SCOPUS , PUBMED indexed publications. He is reviewer of Science and Engineering Research Board ( SERB), Govt of India and in few biomedical journals. He has authored a chapter of Pharmacology in book entitled TARGET JIPMER , 1st ed, 2013 published by Wolters Kluwer

Abstract:

Being widely prevalent, metabolic syndrome is magnanimous as it is escalating in developed and developing nations as well. Affecting the younger population, it has significant impact on health economy, quality of life and major hindrance in achieving sustainable development in global public health and millennium development goals-V by 2035. 
Role of nutrition in metabolic syndrome is explicable; however it’s not just over nutrition even under nutrition contributes by the theory of nutritional programming of low birth weight babies acquiring catch up growth of adiposity between 2 and 12 years of age and hence augmenting the risk of metabolic dysfunction in future.  Primordial prevention of metabolic syndrome should include prevention on over nutrition as well as under nutrition from the fetal life to protect our next generation. 
From therapeutics point of view role of vitamin D, E and calcium supplementation is controversial to fetch any evidence their role in metabolic syndrome. Vitamin E, co enzyme Q10 is useful to treat statin induced myalgia which is the key drug used in this condition. Selenium, zinc and iron found to have positive association in metabolic syndrome in several studies.  
Future is optimistic and lots to ponder for young minds in this thrust area. Biotin, magnesium and certain bioenhancers of metabolism improves insulin sensitivity which is a central component of metabolic syndrome. Dietary approach to stop hypertension- DASH regimen should be followed to reduce blood pressure. Paleolithic diet gaining its momentum to tackle abdominal syndrome and more approaches are in pipeline to battle against this pandemic. 
 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Faith Kok                                                                                                                                        photo
Biography:

F. Kok is a Fourth Year Medical Student at Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, National Technological University, Singapore. S.P. Yeleswarapu is a Consultant at the Department of Children Development at KK Women’s and Children Hospital, Singapore. She is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor with Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore

Abstract:

The impact of Maladaptive behaviors on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of pre-school children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is relatively unexplored. This study intends to explore the extent of influence that different types of Maladaptive behaviors (Internalized, Asocial and Externalized) have on HRQOL in this group, when background characteristics (age, gross monthly income, housing type and daily sleep duration) and adaptive functioning are controlled.

Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised (SIB-R) and background characteristic questionnaires from 99 caregivers of children with ASD seeking treatment at KK Women and Children’s Hospital were collected. These were used to assess the severity of Maladaptive behaviors, the level of Adaptive functioning and a few background characteristics of these children. The relationship of these with Psychosocial and Physical HRQOL in these children is assessed with Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL).

Multiple Regression revealed that Maladaptive behaviors have greater impact on HRQOL than Adaptive skills and background characteristics. Asocial maladaptive behaviors have the most unique influence on HRQOL out of the three Maladaptive behaviors, suggesting difficulties in social interaction and communication manifested by children with ASD play the largest role in their HRQOL at this age. Adaptive skills have a smaller but still unique impact on HRQOL, while background characteristics are not significant.

The specific types of Asocial Maladaptive behavior and their impact of HRQOL in this age group can be further studied with ASD-specific scales like Social Responsive Scale (SRS) and Repetitive Behaviors Scale-Revised (RBS-R). More targeted behavioral intervention can be then developed to improve the quality of life amongst preschool children with ASD.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andrea J Levinson photo
Biography:

Andrea J Levinson is the Psychiatrist-in-Chief, Health & Wellness, at the University of Toronto. She is responsible for the provision and management of psychiatric services to U of T students, primarily from the St. George campus. She supervises all of the psychiatric activity, and acts as a resource for the university community on mental health issues across the campus. She is also a graduate of the Clinician Scientist Program and received a Master’s of Science degree for her research in that program. She has extensive youth psychiatry, having founded an early intervention clinic for young people with new onset bipolar disorders. Currently, she is the Clinical Lead in Bipolar Disorders at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In the university campus clinic where 14,000 students have been seen in the past year, family physicians provide the majority of longitudinal mental health care and support to students with psychiatric diagnoses. Historically, they have lacked prompt access to psychiatric consultation and have had to support students’ mental health needs alone, necessitating urgent care and emergency room visits. In the clinic situated on campus, psychiatric consultation was provided in a separate manner, where family physicians were not involved in the care plan for a student, and psychiatric care was not collaborative, shared or responsive. The University of Toronto (U of T) is the largest university in Canada, with 60,000 post-secondary students attending its central St. George campus.

Methodology: This study describes the development of a coordinated, collaborative model of service delivery where family physicians would have greater access to consultation and collaboration in the care of young transitional youth on the university campus. Interdisciplinary care is delivered in the family practice setting. Service utilization, the efficacy of the model and the perspectives of students and care providers are evaluated.

Findings: Collaborative care has facilitated more stream-lined and student-centered access to psychiatric care in a large campus health setting. The integrated medical and psychiatric needs of this young transitional youth cohort on campus are met through case conferencing, indirect care and a “shared care” delivery of service model.

Conclusion & Significance: Collaborative care provides a pathway and model of care that creates scope for indirect psychiatric consultation, quicker access to psychiatric opinion and consultation, and interdisciplinary learning for different healthcare providers. 

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 11:00-11:15 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

Thomas E Serena

President, Serena Groups | USA

Keynote: Translational medicine in wound healing: The future is bright
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Thomas E Serena photo
Biography:

Thomas E Serena MD FACS, Founder and Medical Director of SerenaGroup®, a family of wound, hyperbaric and research companies. Serena completed his residency in Surgery at the Hershey Medical Center. To date he has opened and operates wound care centers across the United Sates and globally. He has been the lead or Principal investigator in over 100 clinical trials and is recognized internationally as an expert in the field of wound healing: He has more than 100 published papers and has given more than 1000 invited lectures throughout the world. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Wound Healing Society and served two terms on the board of the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) and is now the President-Elect. He has also been Vice-President of the American College of Hyperbaric Medicine and President of the American Professional Wound Care Association.

Abstract:

Clinical research is an essential component of SerenaGroup’s ™ Center-of-Excellence model for wound and hyperbaric centers. We are one of the world’s leaders in clinical research on wound care and hyperbaric medicine, having conducted over 100 clinical trials involving growth factors, gene therapy, genomics, Cellular and Tissue Based products, and novel pharmaceuticals. In 2011 SerenaGroup™ clinics conducted the research that led to the first diagnostic in wound care; this diagnostic procedure was identified in the ensuing manuscript as the Serena Technique©. In conjunction with Harvard’s Wellman Institute we developed and performed the initial clinical studies on a painless, bedside epidermal skin-harvesting device that is functioning not only in hospitals in the US but in third-world clinics as well. We have filed numerous patents on novel products that were conceived in the clinics facing unmet needs, developed in our lab and returned to the clinic for clinical trials. Our emphasis on clinical research over the years has drawn a group of young clinicians and scientists who are dedicated to advancing the science of wound healing to participate in our research projects in the US and internationally. We formed the nation’s first wound healing cooperative group consisting of more than 30 centers in the US and worldwide that now conducts entire multi-national clinical trials. In 2015 SerenaGroup Innovation™ opened a laboratory at Northeastern Ohio Medical School to conduct preclinical studies in wound healing. As a result of these efforts, our research team has filed numerous patents. Serena will review innovations in the field of wound care including therapies on the horizon, such as genomics and genetically modified products. He will review data from ongoing trials on indocyanine green fluorescent angiography and cellular-and-tissue-based products for wound care(CTP), examine advances in hyperbaric oxygen therapy, diagnostics and prognostics in wound care, present new pharmaceuticals on the horizon, and discuss the impact of quality measures on practice and reimbursement.

Keynote Forum

Hyoung K Lee

Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA

Keynote: Advances in diagnostic X-ray sources
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hyoung K Lee photo
Biography:

Dr. Hyoung Lee has his expertise in radiation detection and imaging. He has worked in teaching hospitals as a medical physicist and has also been a faculty member in academia since receiving his PhD. His research area includes radiation detector design and characterization, advanced radiation sources, advanced imaging systems using x-ray, gamma ray or neutron, algorithms for CT reconstruction, image processing, image analysis, and application of deep learning for medical imaging. He has successfully conducted many research projects that covered a wide spectrum of radiation detection and imaging technologies, from development of radiation detectors to development of image enhancement algorithms (some of which were transferred to industry). He also helped a medical imaging company develop flat-panel x-ray image sensors, digital radiography systems, digital dental imaging systems and cone-beam CT systems. His current research includes development of flat-panel x-ray sources, compact x-ray tubes for stationary cardiac CT and switchable radioisotopes.

 

Abstract:

X-ray imaging has been a prominent part of diagnostics since x-ray was discovered by Röntgen in 1895. Over the past ~120 years, the x-ray source technology has undergone noteworthy advancements that resulted in a wide range of x-ray imaging modalities for diagnosing various ailments in human anatomy. With the contribution of researchers from all over the globe, the x-ray source technology has been continually advanced to overcome the technical challenges behind applying the x-ray imaging technology to various imaging modalities. In this talk, the advances in diagnostic x-ray sources and their applications that have already being implemented in medical practice and that have a potential to make it to medical practice in the near future will be discussed. It will start with a brief history of x-ray sources along with major leaps in technology that overcame challenges such as dissipating large amount of heat from the anode, maintaining vacuum pressure in the tube, extending the tungsten filament lifetime, and avoiding high-voltage breakdown. Other technical challenges and issues of certain x-ray imaging systems, for example, cardiac CT, duel-energy (spectral) CT, etc. will be discussed. Recent research activities in x-ray tube technology such as utilization of field emission electron source in place of filament, transmission type anodes, distributed x-ray sources, and flat-panel x-ray sources (Fig. 1) will be introduced. In addition, advanced diagnostic imaging systems such as stationary CT and tetrahedron beam CT based on advanced architecture of x-ray tubes will be introduced. The stationary CT system implements a stationary gantry with x-ray sources and detectors distributed along the gantry to electronically sweep an x-ray beam along the gantry (Fig. 2), which is expected to reach a temporal resolution of ~30 msec.  Finally, nonbremsstrahlung x-ray sources that may be useful for medical imaging in the future will be introduced.

 

Keynote Forum

Anna Kusior

AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland

Keynote: Copper oxide nanostructures for electrochemical sensing – facet-dependent electrochemical
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anna Kusior photo
Biography:

A. Kusior received her MSc in a filed of materials science and PhD in chemistry from AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland in 2015. Since 2015 she has been working as Assistant at Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics at AGH. Her scientific research concern the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for photoelectrochemical and sensing applications. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals

Abstract:

To design the shape of nanocrystals in one of the most important issues in nanoscience, chemistry, and physics owing to the close correlations between the surface morphology and the surface energy and chemical reactivity. Preferential adoption of-of organic and inorganic additives on certain crystallographic surfaces offer a good opportunity to tune and control the surface activities of nanomaterials. The ability to understand, predict and control of exposed surfaces is of critical importance to elucidate and explore shape-dependent chemical and physical properties.

Cuprous oxide Cu2O is a p-type semiconductor, which can be operated at relatively low temperatures. It posses high stability and good electrocatalytic characteristics. The conductivity of Cu2O is mainly determined by the hole carrier density of the inter-granular contact region. Moreover, materials based on copper are the most evolving group due to their redox pair Cu2+/Cu3+.

Presented work aims to investigate the influence of the copper oxide nanostructures with well-defined faces towards their electrochemical sensing activity. Different morphologies of Cu2O nanocrystals were synthesized by a typical wet-chemical technique in the presence of various capping/reducing agents. The morphology of obtained materials was analyzed by SEM observation. The XRD, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy measurements were carried out for phase analysis. The surface properties were determined by DLS and zeta potential measurements. Electrochemical behavior towards glucose, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrazine detection was investigated by cyclic voltammetry.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prakash Bhuyan photo
Biography:

Prakash Bhuyan received his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center and completed his Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania. He was Board Certified in both Internal Medicine and Adult Infectious Diseases and joined Inovio Pharmaceuticals as Vice President of Clinical Development in 2016 from Pfizer and, prior to that, Merck where he helped lead the development and licensure of Trumenba™ and Vaxelis™, respectively. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He has published dozens of scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals in the field of Vaccinology.

Abstract:

Objectives: Assessment of the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of VGX-3100 in women with biopsy-proven CIN2/3 with HPV16 and or HPV18 infection.

\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nMethods: Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, stratified by age and severity of CIN, evaluated cervical tissue changes after three 6 mg intramuscular doses of VGX-3100 followed by electroporation with Inovio’s CELLECTRA®2000 device at weeks 0, 4 and 12.

\r\n\r\nResults: Among 167 vaccinated women, the study met its primary efficacy endpoint; the percentage of patients who had regression of CIN2/3 to CIN1 or no disease at 6 months post third dose was significantly higher in VGX-3100 recipients compared to placebo (p=0.034). VGX-3100 cleared HPV16/18 infection concurrent with regression of CIN2/3 (p=0.003). Post-hoc immune analysis revealed significantly elevated immune responses in treated patients who had CIN2/3 regression concurrent with HPV16/18 clearance when compared to those who did not. This included the presence of CD8+ T-cells in the blood exhibiting CD137 expression concurrent with perforin (p=0.032) as well as perforin in addition to granzyme A (p=0.036) as well as an influx of CD8+ T-cells into cervical tissue (p=0.008).

\r\n\r\nConclusion: The successful phase 2b results represent a significant milestone in the development of active immunotherapies to treat HPV-related dysplasia and cancer. The data generated from the trial reveal a significant clinical benefit afforded by treatment with VGX-3100 and underscore the mechanism of action of HPV specific T cells. Thus VGX-3100 has the potential to provide an important alternative or adjunct to surgery in treating CIN 2/3.

Keynote Forum

Shripad D. Banavali

Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India

Keynote: Propranolol in Angiosarcoma: First Major Advance in Decades
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shripad D. Banavali photo
Biography:

Shripad D. Banavali is an MD (Med; Bom), BC (Ped; USA), BE (Hem-Onc; USA),Professor & Head, Dept. of Medical & Pediatric Oncology,Coordinator,  TMC-Rural Outreach Program, Tata Memorial Center, India.

Abstract:

Early clinical trial results using the βblocker, propranolol for the treatment of advanced angiosarcoma are so positive that an international group of researchers is urging clinicians worldwide to "embrace this new therapeutic option." In early January — after an international clinical trial reported results showing that propranolol and vinblastinebased, metronomic chemotherapy led to a 100% response in 7 patients with inoperable angiosarcoma — propranolol was assigned, orphan drug status in Europe.," This is a major step forward towards the clinical development of propranolol in oncology in Europe and worldwide," study, lead Eddy Pasquier, PhD, from the Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Marseille, France, said of the drug's new, status in an email. "Unless patients present with known contraindications to βblockers, this nontoxic drug could benefit the majority of advanced angiosarcoma patients. The study was a collaborative effort between Dr Pasquier and Shripad D. Banavali, MD, professor and head of the Department of Medical and Pediatric Oncology at Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India. It followed on the heels of their earlier case report of a 69yearold woman with metastatic angiosarcoma who was treated with a combination of metronomic chemotherapy and propranolol. "If successful, betablockade could be the first major advancement in the treatment of angiosarcoma in decades," the researchers said in a report published in November 2015 in JAMA Dermatology.

Keynote Forum

Seong Hwan Kim

Dankook University, Korea

Keynote: Recent outbreak of trichoderma damage in shiitake cultivation
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Seong Hwan Kim photo
Biography:

Seong Hwan Kim has completed his PhD and Postdoctoral studies from University of British Columbia. He is a Professor of Dankook University. He has published more than 90 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a Member of Board of Directors of Korean Society of Mushroom Science, Audit of Korean Mycological Society and an Editorial Board Member of Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology and Journal of Odor and Indoor Environment.

Abstract:

Recently, Korean shiitake mushroom industry has been suffered from mushroom flies which feeds on mycelium of shiitake mushroom during its cultivation. The damages of shiitake bed-logs are assumed to be caused not only by the insect pest but also its fungal associates. From the examination of fungi derived in and out of the bodies of adults of mushroom flies that were reported as major pest in Shiitake cultivation using sawdust-medium, 1249 isolates were obtained and classified into 5 genera and 15 species. T. harzianum was found to be dominant. To get information on the six Trichoderma groups, their cultivation, growth, biochemical properties, scanning electron microscopic images of microstructures and nucleotide sequences of EF-1 alpha gene were investigated and compared. The results of a chromogenic media-based assay for extracellular enzymes showed that these Trichoderma species have the ability to produce amylase, carboxyl-methyl cellulase, avicelase, pectinase and β-glucosidase that degrade wood components of log-beds. A dual culture assay on PDA indicated that T. harzianum, T. atroviride, and T. citrinoviride were antagonistic against the mycelial growth of a shiitake strain (Lentinula edodes). Inoculation tests on shiitake bed-logs revealed that all the four species were able to damage the wood of bed-logs. Eleven fungicides including azoles types and fenarimol were tested against the Trichoderma spp. to select effective agent. Some of the tested fungicides inhibited the mycelial growth of few of the Trichoderma spp. Benomyl inhibited mycelial growth and spore germination of all the six Trichoderma spp. at MIC 10 µg/ml.

Keynote Forum

Xiong Z Ruan

University College London, UK

Keynote: Fatty kidneA new concept for an old disease
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiong Z Ruan photo
Biography:

Xiong Z Ruan leads a research laboratory in UCL Centre for Nephrology which is one of the biggest renal-oriented lipid research laboratories in the world, and also
act as the Director and Professor of Centre for Nephrology in Shenzhen University and the Joint Centre for Lipid Research in UCL-Chongqing Medical University.
He received his MSc in Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) in 1994 and PhD from University College London (UCL) in 1999. He is the Vice-President
of Chinese Society of Renal Physiology and Associate Editor for BMC Nephrology. His major goal has been to develop an academic research program cross UK
and China that investigates the mechanisms of inflammatory stress accompanying with chronic kidney diseases in lipid trafficking control and address clinical
problems of lipid mediated tissue injuries associated with kidney disease (‘Cardio Kidney Diabetes’). He has published more than 80 papers in Nature Rev Nephrol,
J Am Soc Nephrol, Kidney Int, Lancet Diabete Endocrinology, Am J Physiol, Arterioscler Vasc Bio, and Hepatology etc.

Abstract:

When the ‘lipid nephrotoxicity hypothesis’ was proposed in 1982 by Moorhead, increasing evidence from our and
other laboratories has supported the hypothesis that lipid abnormalities contribute to both atherosclerosis and
glomerulosclerosis. The lipid profile of patients with CKD is typified by high circulating levels of VLDL triglycerides/free fatty
acids (FAs), and by low plasma levels of HDL cholesterol. The plasma LDL level is not usually increased in patients with CKD
and might even be reduced. Surprisingly, low plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol are associated with an increased cardiovascular
risk of death in these patients a case of ‘reverse epidemiology’. We have demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo that inflammatory
stress increases intracellular cholesterol influx into vascular smooth muscle cells, mesangial cells and macrophages by inducing
scavenger receptor expression. This increased influx disrupts LDL receptor feedback regulation and causes unrestrained LDL
receptor-mediated LDL uptake. Inflammation also inhibits ATP-binding-cassette-transporter-1-mediated cholesterol efflux
from these cells. Hence inflammatory stress accompanied by CKD modifies cholesterol homeostasis by diverting cholesterol
from blood to tissues. This cholesterol redistribution causes cholesterol to accumulate in kidney and vessel wall, and also
lowers circulating cholesterol levels. This is why cardiovascular risk is increased up to 33-fold in patients with renal failure,
but plasma cholesterol levels are not high. In addition, inflammatory stress causes a degree of statin resistance by overriding
the suppression of HMGCoA reductase activity by statins. Albumin carries >99% of plasma FAs. In CKD (especially diabetic
kidney disease) the circulating levels of FAs are markedly increased leading to an increase in the FA load per albumin molecule,
with a molar FA: albumin ratio of approximately 6 compared to ≤1 in health. Serum FAs bound to albumin in glomerular
filtrate are reabsorbed by the proximal tubular cells and mediate tubular damage by poorly understood mechanisms. We have
demonstrated that palmitic acid (FA) increased CD36 gene expression and protein modifications in HK-2 cells (glycosylations
and palmitoylations) which either mediate FA uptake or form complexes with TLR4, activating an inflammatory response.
High fat diet increased CD36 expression in the kidneys of mice and enhanced tubulointerstitital lipid accumulation and
tubulointerstitial fibrosis all of which would be prevented by knocking-out CD36, suggesting that CD36 acts as a ‘bridge’
linking high levels of FAs, fatty kidney, inflammatory response and CD36 de-palmitoylation would be a potential molecular
target for anti-fibrotic therapy. In conclusion, high levels of FAs induce metabolic inflammatory stress which causes cholesterol
redistribution from circulation to kidney and vessels and lowers serum cholesterol levels. This suggests that there is no safe
serum cholesterol level in the presence inflammatory stress. Statin resistance suggests that higher concentrations of statin may
be required to achieve the same biological and clinical effects in CKD.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Roohi S Ahmad photo
Biography:

ReGeneraTing Agents (RGTAs) are a family of polymers bioengineered to stabilise heparin-binding growth factors by mimicking Heparan Sulphate (HS) thereby protecting them and promoting tissue repair and regeneration. In inflammation, destruction of HS exposes the ExtraCellularMatrix – ECM (structural & cellular proteins within) to the actions of proteases and glycanases which break them down and also act on cytokines and growth factors to prevent adequate repair. In injured tissue, RGTAs would replace destroyed HS by binding to the structural proteins and reconstruct the ECM scaffold. Growth factors will also bind to RGTA and resume position and organization resembling that of non-injured tissue. Hence RGTAs showed they induce a regeneration process by restoring the proper cellular micro-environment. More recently a RGTA named CACIPLIQ20 was adapted to skin lesions and has shown efficacy in various trials of non-healing leg ulcers.

 

We extrapolated this action to human tissue (of poor vascularity) and applied the same RGTA with meticulous wound care techniques on 15 patients with wounds of varying sizes and depths in the upper limb. We observed that the wounds healed or granulation tissue grew again where there was dead skin and no visible underlying blood supply which in usual circumstances would have resulted in loss of limb length, dry gangrene or at best healing by severe scarring. Exposed tendons were also covered with granulation tissue, and resulted in a fair range of motion. Full thickness palmar and dorsal wounds also healed beautifully reproducing a flexible movable dorsal surface not seen in granulating, scarred healing.

Abstract:

Roohi completed her basic medical and Master’s degrees in Orthopaedic Surgery from National University of Malaysia and is presently holding a tenured post in Universiti Putra Malaysia. She has more than 2 decades of surgical experience and practising rights in four countries. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and is presently working on stem cell applications in bones and soft tissues

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hans von Holst  photo
Biography:

Hans von Holst received his MD´s degree in 1976 and specialist in Neurosurgery 1982, Karolinska University Hospital. In 1985 he earned his PhD and Associate Professorship in Neurosurgery, Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet and appointed as senior neurosurgeon 1988 - 2015. During 1991-1996 he was Chairman of the Dept of Neurosurgery and Division Manager of the Neuroclinics at Karolinska University Hospital, respectively. Between 1994-2014 he was appointed as Professor in Neuroengineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and visiting Professor at Karolinska Institutet 2006-2012, He has published over 150 original papers in reputed journals, reviews and books including editorial board member in several journals.

 

Abstract:

               Increased intracellular water content defined as cytotoxic brain tissue edema is a serious secondary clinical complication to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke and without knowledge to the etiology. Recently a hypothesis to the nervous tissue edema was presented suggesting that external dynamic and internal mechanical static impact forces caused protein unfolding resulting in an increased brain tissue water content and what happens with the metabolism in the long run. The hypothesis was confirmed by computer simulation tests. In this laboratory study we further evaluated the hypothesis by using the mature protein laminin LN521 upon the effects of both dynamic as well as static impact forces, respectively. The treated laminin solutions were then analyzed with denatured electrophoresis and Electron Microscopy showing aggregation and fragmentation of the laminin structures. The present laboratory results confirm earlier hypothesis and computer simulation suggesting for the first time that dynamic impact force in an accident and increased mechanical static force in stroke unfold mature proteins having the potential to increase the intracellular water content defined as cytotoxic brain tissue edema. The clinical condition resembles the phenomenon when elasmobranchs including white sharks prevent their cells from too high hydrostatic pressure in the deep sea. Thus, the present laboratory study results and knowledge from marine physics may be considered to improve the clinical treatment and outcome of TBI and stroke patients. This opens up new perspectives how vascular dementia in TBI and Stroke should be looked upon when it come sto clinical treatment.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mahendra Shah photo
Biography:

Mahendra Shah has more than 40 years of professional experience in academia at University of Nairobi and University of Cambridge, United Nations organizations and agencies such as FAO, WFP, UNDP, etc. and the World Bank and international scientific and policy research institutes like International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). His professional work is concerned with food security, nutrition and health, sustainable agricultural development and international trade, sustainable development, climate change and international negotiations. In the private sector, since 2004, he is the Founder and President-Director of Zen Resort Bali, where the vision is to create holistic wellness systems where guests experience the knowledge and means to achieving personal harmony with their body, mind and spirit through healthy nutrition and diet in combination with Ayurveda therapy, yoga, meditation, pranayama and holiday recreational activities as well as emotional healing.

Abstract:

In the 21st century, the escalating worldwide adoption of modern lifestyles; often characterized by unhealthy food habits, especially overeating, in combination with inadequate physical, psychological and spiritual balanced exercises, stress at home, stress at work and living in an increasingly polluting environment, is resulting in widespread ailments and diseases, including obesity and diabetes, depression and mental stress, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases and more. The scale of this healthcare burdens is such that we simply may not have the time and resources to confront and overcome this emerging crisis. Whilst philosophically Hippocrates oath of modern medicine and the Ayurveda oath of traditional medicine have much in common, integrating modern and traditional healthcare systems is an imperative to confront the 21st century ailments and diseases of modern lifestyles. The vast knowledge of modern and traditional medicine from around the world needs to be combined, recognizing that a human being is a whole living organism rather than merely a combination of parts, systems and symptoms. The challenge here is to deliver the right mix of preventive, restorative and curative care to enhance and balance body, mind and spiritual health. Recalling, “food is thy medicine, thy medicine is food”, we cannot go on consuming unhealthy food and do too little exercise - physical, mental and spiritually balanced and in doing so hoping to prevent and cure the overeating lifestyle disorders of obesity and diabetes. We will present a brief review of the modern medical approach to treatments of overweight and obesity in the context of the 21st century health challenges as more and more people adopt unhealthy lifestyles, which are the main driver of the doubling of overweight children, adolescents and adults in many countries. We will put into perspective the critical preventive role and relevance of traditional medicine, specifically Ayurveda, yoga, pranayama, meditation and naturopathy in confronting the obesity challenges. We will conclude presenting our experiences of developing practical holistic wellness systems, relevant to the treatment of overweight and obesity through healthy nutrition and diet and detox in combination with integrated Ayurveda, yoga, meditation, pranayama and recreational activities as well as emotional wellbeing. Examples of practical innovations developed at Zen and relevant to treatment of overweight and obesity including dosha balanced food consumption and diet and Zenchi; a physically, mentally and spiritually balanced exercise regime.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break with Group Photo at 10:50-11:10

Keynote Forum

Mahi R. Singh

Professor, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Keynote: Applications of Metallic Nanoparticles in Biosensors and Bioelectronics
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mahi R. Singh photo
Biography:

Mahi R Singh working as a professor since 1985 at The University of Western Ontario which is one best and largest Universities in Canada. He was a Royal Society Professor at Oxford University and worked in High Magnetic Lab in Toulouse. He was Chief researcher at Hitachi Research Lab in Tokyo. He also worked at McGill University, Montreal with P.R. Wallace who invented Graphene theoretically in 1947. He have very active research group and have produced many graduate students/postdocs who are professors all over the world. He have international theoretical and experimental collaborations in US, UK, Spain, Italy, Sweden, China, Germany, India, Egypt, Argentina, and Mexico. For example, He is developing collaboration with Klaus von Klitzing and he is visiting him next summer. Recently he have organized about 16 international conferences and hosted three Nobel Laureates (Klitzing, Leggatt and Yonah). He have been invited as plenary and invited speaker throughout the word. Since 2003, he have presented about 100 public, plenary and invited talks in many international conferences and universities in the world. He has published about 300 papers and 10 books in condensed matter physics, optoelectronics, plasmonics, nanophotonics, nanomaterials, nano-hybrids and metamaterials.

Abstract:

Recently there is considerable interest to study metallic nanoparticle for the application of biosensors and bioelectronics [1-4]. Noble-metal nanoparticles are known to enhance emission rates of quantum emitters (QEs) significantly by decreasing their radiative lifetime and increasing their quantum yield [1-2]. The enhancement of the emission in QEs such as molecular fluorophores is a highly useful strategy for improving detection sensitivity and selectivity in many emerging applications in biosensors and bioelectronics, and DNA screening. Recently, there is considerable interest to study hybrid systems made of biocompatible fluorescent molecules and metallic double nanoshells (DNSs) for biomedical imaging and for the detection of disease markers in the near-infrared wavelength region. The penetration depth of near-infrared light is large in most biological media. It is found that these hybrids have large absorption coefficients and high quantum yields in the far-infrared region. Here we study the light emission from quantum emitter and double metallic nanoshell hybrid systems. Quantum emitters act as local sources which transmit their light efficiently due to double nanoshell near field. The double nanoshell consists a dielectric core and two outer nanoshells. The first nanoshell is made of a metal and the second spacer nanoshell is made of a dielectric material or human serum albumin. We have calculated the fluorescence emission for a quantum emitter-double nanoshell hybrid when it is injected in an animal or human body. The outer spacer nanoshell of double metallic nanoshells consists of silica and human serum albumin with variable thickness. We find that the thickness of the spacer nanoshell layer increases the enhancement when the fluorescence decreases. The enhancement of the fluorescence depends on the type of quantum emitter, spacer layer and double nanoshell. We also found that the peak of the fluorescence spectrum can be shifted by changing the shape and size of the nanoshell. The fluorescence spectra can be switched from one peak to two peaks by removing the degeneracy of excitonic states in the quantum emitter. Hence using these properties, one can use these hybrids as biosensing and switching devices for applications in bioelectronics.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Margaret Wisłowska  photo
Biography:

Margaret Wisłowska is the Head of the Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at Szpital Kliniczny MSW, Poland. She is a Specialist in Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Rehabilitation Medicine and Hypertension. She is the author of over 200 scientific papers and books. She has participated in numerous scientific meetings and is a Promoter of 12 PhD thesis. She took trainings at Guy and St. Thoma’s Hospitals in London, Charity Hospital in Berlin and Rheumatology Institutes in Prague and Moscow. In 2003, she started the Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology; and in 2010 the Clinic of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Szpital Kliniczny MSW, Poland. She is a Professor at the Warsaw Medical University, Poland.

Abstract:

Sjogren syndrome [SS] is an inflammatory autoimmune disease affecting primarily the exocrine glands. Lymphocytic infiltrates replace functional epithelium leading to decreased exocrine secretions (exocrinopathy). Characteristic autoantibodies, anti-Ro (SS-A) and anti-La (SS-B) are produced. Mucosal dryness manifests as xerophthalmia (keratoconjunctivitis sicca), xerostomia, xerotrachea and vaginal dryness. The periepithelial extraglandular manifestations are the results of lymphocytic invasion in epithelial tissues of the lungs, kidneys and the liver. The extraepithelial manifestations, such as skin vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy and glomerulonephritis with low C4 levels, are associated with increased morbidity and high risk for lymphoma. Clinical manifestations include glandular involvement such as ocular involvement and oropharyngeal involvement; and extraglandular manifestations such as arthritis, skin involvement (purpura, annular erythema and Raynaud’s phenomenon); pulmonary involvement (bronchial abnormalities and parenchymal changes), gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary features; neuromuscular involvement (mononeuritis multiplex, polyneuropathy); and renal involvement (renal tubular acidosis, glomerulonephritis). Minor salivary gland biopsy from the inferior lip is a cornerstone for the diagnosis of SS. In microscopic examination, the focal score in an area of 4 mm2 of focal aggregates of at least 50 lymphocytes is sufficient for diagnosis. Another possibility to recognize SS is with an ocular staining score of 3 or greater. IgG4 positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome like Mikulicz disease (MD) is characterized by high serum levels of IgG4 and tissue biopsies showing an infiltration of IgG4+ plasma cells coupled with fibrosis or sclerosis. Compared with SS, MD does not show the same female predominance and is associated with a lower frequency of dry eyes and dry mouth, arthralgia, and serum antinuclear antibody (ANA) test positivity.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Ishraga Elbashier photo
Biography:

Dr. Ishraga M. A. Elbashier* M.Sc. Medical Surgical Nursing U. of K. 2007, PhD surgical nursing U   of K. 2017, Assistant Professor  in AAU, Faculty of M.T.S. nursing department. Head of quality assurance department. teaching pre and post graduate students medical surgical nursing module, critical care nursing, nursing theory, nursing management, and research methodology. 

Abstract:

The presence of anxiety and depression    before cardiac surgery leads to poor surgical outcomes. This study conducted to assess the effectiveness of psycho-educational programme on anxiety and depression among patients undergoing cardiac surgery in cardiac centers Khartoum state. 

Keynote Forum

Ellie Wright

Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, USA

Keynote: Nourish the brain: Omega-3 fatty improve and prevent neurodegenerative disease
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ellie Wright photo
Biography:

Ellie Wright has obtained her Bachelor’s degree at Arizona State University in 2008, Master’s degree (ASU) and Graduate Certificate in Geriatric and Gerontology from Arizona University in 2010 and Doctoral degree from Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, USA in 2015. She is passionate in the field of natural medicine.

Abstract:

Anti-inflammatory Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-PUFAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may improve or prevent some psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. In clinical studies, depressed patients manifest higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. As human brain is mostly made of fat, fatty acids are most crucial molecules that determine the brain's integrity. Beneficial effects of the omega-3 PUFAs has been linked to their involvement in multiple biochemical functions, including synthesis of inflammatory mediators, cell membrane fluidity, intracellular signaling and gene expression. Through these pathways, the omega-3 PUFAs help modulate aspects of inflammation and immunity, cell growth and tissue repair. As important membrane component, n-3-PUFAs benefit brain health by modulating neuroimmune and apoptotic pathways, changing membrane function and competing with n-6 PUFAs strongly suggest omega-3 PUFAs may modulate inflammation and neurogenerative diseases.

Keynote Forum

Patricia M Davidson

Johns Hopkins University, USA

Keynote: Health care: a life course approach to health and well-being
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Patricia M Davidson photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Health care knowledge and practice models are commonly compartmentalized and siloed leading to poor integration and adverse health outcomes across health and social services. Healthy People 2020 in the United States and the World Health Organization’s, Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health (2008) provide roadmaps for addressing the social determinants of health as well as biological issues.  In this presentation the importance of social determinants of health will be addressed  and demonstration of how the environments into which people are born determine health and well –being across the lifespan, even at the moment of death.   This is an important call to action for nurses and midwives and requires considering the intersection of health and social services from maternity to end-of-life care. Implications for policy, practice, education and research will be presented.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tetyana Milojevic photo
Biography:

Tetyana Milojevic has her expertise in the area of metal-microbial-mineral interactions. Since 2014 she is a deputy head of the Department of Biophysical Chemistry at the Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna and a leader of Biochemistry/Space Microbiology group investigating biotransformation of terrestrial and extraterrestrial minerals and microbial survivability in outer space environment. She has been leading an “excellence” Elise-Richter FWF research project to decipher metal-oxidizing machinery of the extreme thermoacidophile Metallospaera sedula.    

 

 

Abstract:

The ability of chemolithotrophic microorganisms to catalyze redox transformations of metals is an exquisite tool for energy transduction between a mineral body and a living entity. Evolutionally diversified metal-solubilizing microorganisms with their fascinating metabolic routes have developed an exquisite set of capabilities for manipulating minerals, dissolving them to access useful metals. In the meantime, mankind has begun to learn how to harness their activities in biotechnological processes. Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy), which relies on metal solubilization mediated by microorganisms. Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles have widespread use in the processing of metals ores. We have been investigating the microbial-mineral interface of bioleaching extremophile Metallosphaera sedula, which is a metal-oxidizing archaeon that lives in hot acid conditions and exhibits unusual heavy-metal resistance. Exploring the viability and metal extraction capacity of M. sedula living on and interacting with extraterrestrial and terrestrial minerals, we have shown that this microbe actively colonizes meteorite NWA 1172, synthetic Martian regolith materials, and hard, rare metal oxide ores. Ultrastructural analysis of the hard metal-biomineralized cell wall of M. sedula is a focus of our current investigations to reveal redox destiny and coordination chemistry of the incorporated metals. The results of our work have direct implications for extraterrestrial (e.g., asteroid) biomining and development of In-Situ Resource Utilization Programs, as well as for biomining of rare hard metal ores on Earth.

 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jana Sawynok photo
Biography:

Jana Sawynok has a PhD in Pharmacology, and has been particularly interested in developing novel analgesics (adenosine-based therapeutics, topical analgesics). Since 2000, she has also been interested in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, with applications in chronic pain. She has published 180 papers in reputed journals, including 8 publications on qigong. She currently supervises (in collaboration with Mary Lynch, MD) medical students conducting pragmatic observational trials of qigong in the context of self-care at a tertiary pain care setting.

 

Abstract:

Abstract

Qigong, which has a long history in China as a health and wellness practice, is currently considered as “meditative movement”. In Halifax, we have conducted several trials with Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong for fibromyalgia: a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) (N=100) and an extension trial (N=20) (with standardized regimens for 8 weeks, follow-up 6 months), and reported individual cases (N=2) who undertook extended community-based practice (1-3 years). In the RCT, subjects were randomly assigned to immediate practice, or wait list/delayed practice groups. Training consisted of 3 half-day sessions, with weekly review and practice sessions for 8 weeks; participants were expected to practice daily for 45 mins during this time. Pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function were determined at baseline, at 8 weeks, and at 3 and 6 months. In the immediate practice group, there were significant benefits in all outcomes at 8 weeks compared to the wait-list group, and benefits were maintained at follow-up. In the delayed practice group, similar results were observed, demonstrating reproducibility between two cohorts. Benefits in all areas were related to amount of practice. Qualitative data recapitulated quantitative results, and revealed some further health benefits. In the extension trial, further benefit occurred and health gains were consolidated (e.g. improvements in asthma, food and chemical sensitivities, vision). In individuals who practiced 1-3 years, pain, sleep, and physical and mental function were vastly improved, and there were additional health gains in other areas. Qigong, when practiced diligently, produces marked health benefits in those with fibromyalgia.

Keynote Forum

Salah Rubayi

Division of Plastic Surgery, Keck School of Medicine U.S.C.

Keynote: Heterotopic Ossification in Spinal Cord Injury Patient is a challenge to the plastic surgeon.
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Salah Rubayi photo
Biography:

Dr. Rubayi is a fully trained plastic surgeon from the U.K. and U.S.A.  During the last 36 years he is practicing reconstructive plastic surgery in burn and spinal cord injury patient presented with wounds and pressure ulcers, and hip joint involved with infection and H.O.

He published many articles and he taught this field to the plastic resident at U.S.C. and U.C.L.A.  His last publication is a book “Reconstructive Plastic Surgery of Pressure Ulcers” by Springer 2015 

He is a Chairman, Dept. of Surgery and Chief of Pressure Ulcer Management Program at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center at Downey, CA. U.S.A. and Professor of clinical surgery at U.S.C.

 

Abstract:

Heterotopic Ossification is a devastating disease in many patients with primary diagnosis of spinal injury, brain injury, and burn injury.  Twenty percent of SCI patients develop this abnormal pathological calcification around their joints and muscles, which will eventually end in multiple complication to the patient, example restricted range of motion to the joints which may end in complete anklyosis, developing pressure ulcer which is secondary to abnormal fixation of the hip joints and the pelvis.  To summarize the end result is tremendous changes in the quality of patient life.  Nowadays the plastic surgeon involve in the management of many diseases which may involve different specialities.  The advancement of reconstructive surgery has helped to apply this management of the H.O. disease.  The Author will present a comprehensive presentation of the pathological manifestation and surgical management with post-operative management to prevent recurrence of the disease.

 

Keynote Forum

Ramesh K Agarwal

Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Keynote: Design of metamaterials using transformation physics
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ramesh K Agarwal photo
Biography:

Ramesh K Agarwal is the William Palm Professor of Engineering at Washington University in St Louis from 1994 to 2001, he was the Sam Bloomfield Distinguished Professor and Executive Director of the National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University in Kansas. From 1978 to 1994, he worked in various scientific and managerial positions at McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories in St Louis. He became the Program Director and McDonnell Douglas Fellow in 1990. He received PhD in Aeronautical Sciences from Stanford University in 1975, MS in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1969 and BS in Mechanical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India in 1968. He is the author and co-author of over 600 publications and serves on the editorial board of 20+ journals. He has given many plenary, keynote and invited lectures at various national and international conferences worldwide. He is a Fellow of AAAS, ASME, AIAA, IEEE, SAE, and SME.

Abstract:

Metamaterials are rationally designed artificial materials composed of tailored functional building blocks densely packed into an effective (crystalline) material. While metamaterials historically are primarily thought to be associated with negative refractive indices and invisibility cloaking in electromagnetism or optics, it turns out that the simple metamaterial concept also applies to many other areas of physics namely the thermodynamics, classical mechanics (including elastostatics, acoustics, fluid dynamics, and elastodynamics) and in principle also to the quantum mechanics. This lecture will review the basic concepts and analogies behind the thermodynamic, acoustic, elastodynamic/elastostatic, and electromagnetic metamaterials and differences among them. It will provide an overview of the theory, the current state of the art and example applications of various types of metamaterials. The review will also discuss the homogeneous as well as inhomogeneous metamaterial architectures designed by coordinate-transformation-based approaches analogous to transformation optics. The application examples will include laminates, thermal cloaks, thermal concentrators and inverters, anisotropic acoustic metamaterials, acoustic free-space and carpet cloaks, and mechanical metamaterials with negative dynamic mass density, negative dynamic bulk modulus, or negative phase velocity. Finally an example of quantum-mechanical matter-wave cloaking will be provided. 

Keynote Forum

Salah Rubayi

Division of Plastic Surgery, Keck School of Medicine U.S.C.

Keynote: Heterotopic Ossification in Spinal Cord Injury Patient is a challenge to the plastic surgeon.
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Salah Rubayi photo
Biography:

Dr. Rubayi is a fully trained plastic surgeon from the U.K. and U.S.A.  During the last 36 years he is practicing reconstructive plastic surgery in burn and spinal cord injury patient presented with wounds and pressure ulcers, and hip joint involved with infection and H.O.

He published many articles and he taught this field to the plastic resident at U.S.C. and U.C.L.A.  His last publication is a book “Reconstructive Plastic Surgery of Pressure Ulcers” by Springer 2015 

He is a Chairman, Dept. of Surgery and Chief of Pressure Ulcer Management Program at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center at Downey, CA. U.S.A. and Professor of clinical surgery at U.S.C.

 

Abstract:

Dr. Rubayi is a fully trained plastic surgeon from the U.K. and U.S.A.  During the last 36 years he is practicing reconstructive plastic surgery in burn and spinal cord injury patient presented with wounds and pressure ulcers, and hip joint involved with infection and H.O.

He published many articles and he taught this field to the plastic resident at U.S.C. and U.C.L.A.  His last publication is a book “Reconstructive Plastic Surgery of Pressure Ulcers” by Springer 2015 

He is a Chairman, Dept. of Surgery and Chief of Pressure Ulcer Management Program at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center at Downey, CA. U.S.A. and Professor of clinical surgery at U.S.C.

Heterotopic Ossification is a devastating disease in many patients with primary diagnosis of spinal injury, brain injury, and burn injury.  Twenty percent of SCI patients develop this abnormal pathological calcification around their joints and muscles, which will eventually end in multiple complication to the patient, example restricted range of motion to the joints which may end in complete anklyosis, developing pressure ulcer which is secondary to abnormal fixation of the hip joints and the pelvis.  To summarize the end result is tremendous changes in the quality of patient life.  Nowadays the plastic surgeon involve in the management of many diseases which may involve different specialities.  The advancement of reconstructive surgery has helped to apply this management of the H.O. disease.  The Author will present a comprehensive presentation of the pathological manifestation and surgical management with post-operative management to prevent recurrence of the disease.

 

 International Conference Keynote Speaker William R Strohl photo
Biography:

Dr. William Strohl owns BiStro Biotech Consulting LLC, founded in 2016 to help biotechnology companies expand their capabilities.  Prior to retiring from J&J in 2016, Dr. Strohl was VP, Janssen BioTherapeutics.  Before J&J, Dr. Strohl was at Merck from 1997-2008, leading Natural Products Biology and, later, leading Biologics discovery efforts.  From 1980-1997, Dr. Strohl rose from Assistant to Full Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Program of Biochemistry at Ohio State.  Dr. Strohl has >140 publications, 17 patents, and wrote the book "Therapeutic Antibody Engineering: Current and Future Advances Driving the Strongest Growth Area in the Pharma Industry" (2012).

Abstract:

“Biobetter” biologics are intended to improve on the salient characteristics of a known biologic for which there is at least clinical proof-of-concept or, optimally, marketed product data.  Successful biobetter biologics have been generated by improving the pharmacokinetic properties of the innovative drug  such as Neulasta®, a PEGylated, longer half-life version of Neupogen® (filgrastim), and Aranesp®, which is a longer half-life version of Epogen® (epoetin alpha).  It is more difficult to generate and prove the superiority of a biobetter that is intended to have increased potency over the originator, as experienced with the development of AME-133v, a proposed biobetter of rituximab.  There are several known and theoretical mechanisms of action that can be engineered into a monoclonal antibody (Mab) or Fc fusion protein preclinically that may have potential impact on efficacy, safety, convenience, manufacturing, supply chain, cost, and/or patient compliance.  These include modifications of Fc function, half-life, potency, formulation, stability, and route of administration.  Whether or not any of these discovery- or early development-based modifications actually provide a clinical or marketing benefit without compromising safety, however, is often not adequately tested until Phase 2 clinical trials.  The cost of developing biobetter MAbs and Fc fusion proteins is similar to that of developing innovator biologics, so the benefits must be clearly articulated.  Thus, the strategy and design for developing a biobetter biologic needs to be continually put to the test during early development so that go/no go decisions can be made as early as possible to reduce risk and opportunity cost.

Keynote Forum

Sam Vaknin

Southern Federal University, Russia

Keynote: Habit-forming in the time of pandemic
 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sam Vaknin photo
Biography:

Sam Vaknin is Visiting Professor of Psychology, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don, Russia and Professor of Finance and Psychology in CIAPS (Centre for International Advanced and Professional Studies). Sam Vaknin is the author of Malignant Self-love: Narcissism Revisited and other books about personality disorders. His work is cited in hundreds of books and dozens of academic papers. He spent the past 6 years developing Cold Therapy: a treatment modality for Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). Over the years, with dozens of volunteers, he found that it was effective with clients suffering from a major depressive episode as well.

Abstract: